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  1. Exploring Muslim Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility: Are Saudi Business Students Different?Maurice J. Murphy, Jason B. MacDonald, Giselle E. Antoine & Jan M. Smolarski - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):1103-1118.
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  • Exploring Muslim Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility: Are Saudi Business Students Different?Jan Smolarski, Giselle Antoine, Jason MacDonald & Maurice Murphy - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):1103-1118.
    This study investigates potential differences in attitudes towards corporate social responsibility between Saudis and Muslims from other predominately Islamic countries. We propose that Saudi Arabia’s unique rentier-state welfare and higher education systems account for these distinctions. In evaluating our propositions, we replicate Brammer et al. :229–243, 2007) survey on attitudes towards CSR using a sample of Saudi undergraduate and graduate business students and compare the results against data from subjects in other majority Muslim countries. In addition, this work examines possible (...)
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  • Business Responses to Climate Change Regulation in Canada and Germany: Lessons for MNCs From Emerging Economies.Burkard Eberlein & Dirk Matten - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):241 - 255.
    This article proposes a novel mapping of the complex relationship between business ethics and regulation, by suggesting five distinct ways in which business ethics and regulation may intersect. The framework is applied to a comparative case study of business responses to climate change regulation in Canada and Germany, both signatories to the Kyoto Protocol. Both countries represent distinctly different approaches which yield significant lessons for emerging economies. We also analyze the specific role of large multinational corporations in this process.
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  • “It’s Like Hating Puppies!” Employee Disengagement and Corporate Social Responsibility.Kelsy Hejjas, Graham Miller & Caroline Scarles - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Corporate social responsibility has been linked with numerous organizational advantages, including recruitment, retention, productivity, and morale, which relate specifically to employees. However, despite specific benefits of CSR relating to employees and their importance as a stakeholder group, it is noteworthy that a lack of attention has been paid to the individual level of analysis with CSR primarily being studied at the organizational level. Both research and practice of CSR have largely treated the individual organization as a “black box,” failing to (...)
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  • Teaching Business Ethics: The Effectiveness of Common Pedagogical Practices in Developing Students' Moral Judgment Competence.Susan M. Bosco, David E. Melchar, Laura L. Beauvais & David E. Desplaces - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (3):263 - 280.
    This study investigates the effectiveness of pedagogical practices used to teach business ethics. The business community has greatly increased its demands for better ethics education in business programs. Educators have generally agreed that the ethical principles of business people have declined. It is important, then, to examine how common methods of instruction used in business ethics could contribute to the development of higher levels of moral judgment competence for students. To determine the effectiveness of these methods, moral judgment competence levels (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in Western Europe: An Institutional Mirror or Substitute? [REVIEW]Gregory Jackson & Androniki Apostolakou - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):371 - 394.
    In spite of extensive research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its link with economic and social performance, few studies have investigated the institutional determinants of CSR. This article draws upon neo-institutional theory and comparative institutional analysis to compare the influence of different institutional environments on CSR policies of European firms. On the basis of a dataset of European firms, we find that firms from the more liberal market economies of the Anglo-Saxon countries score higher on most dimensions of CSR (...)
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  • Promoting Ethical Reflection in the Teaching of Social Entrepreneurship: A Proposal Using Religious Parables.Nuria Toledano - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    This paper proposes a teaching alternative that can encourage the ethical reflective sensibility among students of social entrepreneurship. It does so by exploring the possibility of using religious parables as narratives that can be analysed from Ricoeur’s hermeneutics to provoke and encourage ethical discussions in social entrepreneurship courses. To illustrate this argument, the paper makes use of a parable from the New Testament as an example of a religious narrative that can be used to prompt discussions about social entrepreneurs’ ethical (...)
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  • Seven Pillars of Business Ethics: Toward a Comprehensive Framework.William Arthur Wines - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):483-499.
    This article first addresses the question of “why” we teach business ethics. Our answer to “why” provides both a response to those who oppose business ethics courses and a direction for course content. We believe a solid, comprehensive course in business ethics should address not only moral philosophy, ethical dilemmas, and corporate social responsibility – the traditional pillars of the disciple – but also additional areas necessary to make sense of the goings-on in the business world and in the news. (...)
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  • Ethics, CSR, and Sustainability Education in the Financial Times Top 50 Global Business Schools: Baseline Data and Future Research Directions.Lisa Jones Christensen, Ellen Peirce, Laura P. Hartman, W. Michael Hoffman & Jamie Carrier - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):347-368.
    This paper investigates how deans and directors at the top 50 global MBA programs (as rated by the "Financial Times" in their 2006 Global MBA rankings) respond to questions about the inclusion and coverage of the topics of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability at their respective institutions. This work purposely investigates each of the three topics separately. Our findings reveal that: (1) a majority of the schools require that one or more of these topics be covered in their MBA (...)
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