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  1. Implicit Learning.Axel Cleeremans - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):406-416.
    Implicit learning is the process through which we become sensitive to certain regularities in the environment (1) in the absence of intention to learn about those regularities (2) in the absence of awareness that one is learning, and (3) in such a way that the resulting knowledge is difficult to express.
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  • Hypnotic Suggestibility Predicts the Magnitude of the Imaginative Word Blindness Suggestion Effect in a Non-Hypnotic Context.Benjamin A. Parris & Zoltan Dienes - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):868-874.
    The present study investigated how the magnitude the word blindness suggestion effect on Stroop interference depended on hypnotic suggestibility when given as an imaginative suggestion and under conditions in which hypnosis was not mentioned. Hypnotic suggestibility is shown to be a significant predictor of the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect under these conditions. This is therefore the first study to show a linear relationship between the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect and hypnotic suggestibility across the whole hypnotizability (...)
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  • Hypnosis as Neurophenomenology.Michael Lifshitz, Emma P. Cusumano & Amir Raz - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Application of the Ex-Gaussian Function to the Effect of the Word Blindness Suggestion on Stroop Task Performance Suggests No Word Blindness.Benjamin A. Parris, Zoltan Dienes & Timothy L. Hodgson - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  • Converging Evidence for de-Automatization as a Function of Suggestion.Natasha Kj Campbell, Ilia M. Blinderman, Michael Lifshitz & Amir Raz - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1579-1581.
  • Observational Learning Without a Model is Influenced by the Observer’s Possibility to Act: Evidence From the Simon Task.Cristina Iani, Sandro Rubichi, Luca Ferraro, Roberto Nicoletti & Vittorio Gallese - 2013 - Cognition 128 (1):26-34.
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  • Impulsivity, Self-Control, and Hypnotic Suggestibility.V. U. Ludwig, C. Stelzel, H. Krutiak, C. E. Prunkl, R. Steimke, L. M. Paschke, N. Kathmann & H. Walter - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):637-653.
    Hypnotic responding might be due to attenuated frontal lobe functioning after the hypnotic induction. Little is known about whether personality traits linked with frontal functioning are associated with responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions. We assessed whether hypnotic suggestibility is related to the traits of self-control and impulsivity in 154 participants who completed the Brief Self-Control Scale, the Self-Regulation Scale, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale , and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility . BIS-11 non-planning impulsivity correlated positively with HGSHS:A . Furthermore, (...)
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  • Lack of Correlation Between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Various Components of Attention.Katalin Varga, Zoltán Németh & Anna Szekely - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1872-1881.
    The purpose of our study was to measure the relationship between performance on various attentional tasks and hypnotic susceptibility. Healthy volunteers participated in a study, where they had to perform several tasks measuring various attention components in a waking state: sustained attention, selective or focused attention, divided attention and executive attention in task switching. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured in a separate setting by the Waterloo-Stanford Groups Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C .We found no significant correlation between any of the (...)
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  • Intentional Action Processing Results From Automatic Bottom-Up Attention: An EEG-Investigation Into the Social Relevance Hypothesis Using Hypnosis.Eleonore Neufeld, Elliot C. Brown, Sie-In Lee-Grimm, Albert Newen & Martin Brüne - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:101-112.
    Social stimuli grab our attention: we attend to them in an automatic and bottom-up manner, and ascribe them a higher degree of saliency compared to non-social stimuli. However, it has rarely been investigated how variations in attention affect the processing of social stimuli, although the answer could help us uncover details of social cognition processes such as action understanding. In the present study, we examined how changes to bottom-up attention affects neural EEG-responses associated with intentional action processing. We induced an (...)
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  • Using Hypnosis to Gain Insights Into Healthy and Pathological Cognitive Functioning.David A. Oakley & Peter W. Halligan - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):328-331.
    The demonstration that hypnotic suggestion can inhibit word/colour Stroop highlights one of the benefits of using hypnosis to explore cognitive psychology and in particular attentional processes. The compelling results using a rigorous design have particular relevance for the presumed automaticity of some forms of information processing. Moreover the results support the potential that hypnotic suggestion offers for creating clinically informed analogues of relevant psychological and neuropsychological conditions. As with all novel research, the results of Raz and Campbell raise further operational (...)
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  • Suggestion Overrides Automatic Audiovisual Integration.Catherine Déry, Natasha K. J. Campbell, Michael Lifshitz & Amir Raz - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:33-37.
    Cognitive scientists routinely distinguish between controlled and automatic mental processes. Through learning, practice, and exposure, controlled processes can become automatic; however, whether automatic processes can become deautomatized – recuperated under the purview of control – remains unclear. Here we show that a suggestion derails a deeply ingrained process involving involuntary audiovisual integration. We compared the performance of highly versus less hypnotically suggestible individuals in a classic McGurk paradigm – a perceptual illusion task demonstrating the influence of visual facial movements on (...)
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