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  1. Deconstructive Aporias: Quasi-Transcendental and Normative.Matthias Fritsch - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):439-468.
    This paper argues that Derrida’s aporetic conclusions regarding moral and political concepts, from hospitality to democracy, can only be understood and accepted if the notion of différance and similar infrastructures are taken into account. This is because it is the infrastructures that expose and commit moral and political practices to a double and conflictual (thus aporetic) future: the conditional future that projects horizonal limits and conditions upon the relation to others, and the unconditional future without horizons of anticipation. The argument (...)
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  • Deterritorializations: Putting Postmodernism to Work on Teacher Education and Inclusion.Julie Allan - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (4):417–432.
  • An Act of Methodology: A Document in Madness—Writing Ophelia.Jenny Steinnes - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):818-830.
    This paper is an attempt to stage some questions concerning methodology and education, inspired by Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet and by Jacques Derrida's poetic philosophical oeuvres. What are at stake are the long traditions of preferences of sanity over madness, friend over enemy, male over female and of clean, unambiguous univocal language over the poetic. I will argue that educators will have an extra responsibility towards challenging the ancient tradition of phallogocentrism, both in our teaching and in our research.
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  • Are Sports More So Private or Public Practices?: A Critical Look at Some Recent Rortian Interpretations of Sport.William J. Morgan - 2000 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):17-34.
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  • Richard Rorty and Epistemic Normativity.Eric T. Kerr & J. Adam Carter - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (1):3-24.
    The topic of epistemic normativity has come to the fore of recent work in epistemology, and so naturally, theories of knowledge, truth and justification have been increasingly held accountable to preserving normative epistemological platitudes. Central to discussions of epistemic normativity are questions about epistemic agency and epistemic value. Here, our aim is to take up some of these issues as they come to bear on the rather unconventional brand of epistemology that was defended by Richard Rorty. Our purpose is to (...)
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  • The Ethics of Internationalisation in Higher Education: Hospitality, Self‐Presence and ‘Being Late’.Marnie Hughes‐Warrington - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (3):312-322.
    While the concept of internationalization plays a key role in contemporary discussions on the activities and outcomes sought by universities, it is commonly argued that it is poorly understood or realised in practice. This has led some to argue that more work is needed to define the dimensions of the concept, or even to plot out stages of its achievement. This paper aims not to provide a definition of internationalisation for those working in higher education. On the contrary, it seeks (...)
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  • Violence and Publicity: Constructions of Political Responsibility After 9/11.Clive Barnett - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):353-375.
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  • The Non-Transparency of the Self and the Ethical Value of Bildung.Christiane Thompson - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (3):519–533.
  • Philosophical Diversity and Disagreement.Bob Plant - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (5):567-591.
    Widespread and lasting consensus has not been philosophy's fate. Indeed, one of philosophy's most striking features is its ability to accommodate “not only different answers to philosophical questions” but also “total disagreement on what questions are philosophical” (Rorty 1995, 58). It is therefore hardly surprising that philosophers' responses to this metaphilosophical predicament have been similarly varied. This article considers two recent diagnoses of philosophical diversity: Kornblith and Rescher (respectively) claim that taking philosophical disagreement seriously does not lead to metaphilosophical scepticism. (...)
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  • Post-Development and its Discontents.Trevor Parfitt - 2011 - Journal of Critical Realism 10 (4):442-464.
    In the 1980s and 1990s the predominant metatheories in development analysis were cast into doubt by their apparent failure in practice. One response to this impasse in development theory was to turn to postmodern ideas to explain their failure. In particular many analysts utilized Foucauldian discourse theory to critique development as a discourse of power. Such analysis gave rise to a post-development school of thought that condemned development as harmful to people in the Global South and advocated its abandonment. This (...)
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  • Aporia, Attentiveness, and the Politics of Social Welfare.Glenn Mackin - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (4):517-539.
  • The Knight of Faith: Ethics in Special Needs Education.Jenny Steinnes - 2011 - Journal of Moral Education 40 (4):457-469.
    This article attempts to contribute to the understanding of the particularly important and inescapable role that ethics must play in the context of special needs education. Perspectives from Kierkegaard and Derrida are presented and used in order to explore the complexity of the context and to show the importance and responsibility of the agency of the educator. Such persons must be able to make risk-filled decisions, with no guarantees, regarding the potential ?good? of others. Consequently, the individual educator must go (...)
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  • Debate: Agonism as Deliberation – on Mouffe's Theory of Democracy.Andrew Knops - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):115–126.
  • Foucault and Derrida: The Question of Empowering and Disempowering the Author.Antonio Calcagno - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (1):33-51.
    This article focuses on Michel Foucault’s concepts of authorship and power. Jacques Derrida has often been accused of being more of a literary author than a philosopher or political theorist. Richard Rorty complains that Derrida’s views on politics are not pragmatic enough; he sees Derrida’s later work, including his political work, more as a “private self-fashioning” than concrete political thinking aimed at devising short-term solutions to problems here and now. Employing Foucault’s work around authorship and the origins of power, I (...)
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  • Paralyses or Battlefields: Pedagogy and a Proposed Parricide.Jenny Steinnes - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (2):185–200.
    In this article I am proposing a post‐structuralist treatment of some concepts central to a pedagogical agenda. These are concepts of territorial implications, such as democracy, nationality, patriotism and the foreign, concepts closely linked to The Enlightenment and to education. I am proposing this because these might be the times, for academics in the field of education, to revitalise reflections around such concepts in order to question the legitimisation and motivations for our actions on new grounds. A deconstruction of the (...)
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  • Transformative Teaching: Restoring the Teacher, Under Erasure.Jenny Steinnes - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):114-125.
    In the large and complex landscape of pedagogy, the focus seems to have turned away from the concept of teaching and towards a stronger emphasis on learning, probably supported by neo-liberal ideology. The teacher is presented more as part of the force of production than as an autonomous performer of a mandate given to him/her by society. He/she is supposed to supply knowledge that is considered useful to a society geared to production and consumption. During the past few decades, enlightenment (...)
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  • Taking Turns: Democracy to Come and Intergenerational Justice.Matthias Fritsch - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (2):148-172.
    In the face of the ever-growing effect the actions of the present may have upon future people, most conspicuously around climate change, democracy has been accused, with good justification, of a presentist bias: of systemically favouring the presently living. By contrast, this paper will argue that the intimate relation, both quasi-ontological and normative, that Derrida's work establishes between temporality and justice insists upon another, more future-regarding aspect of democracy. We can get at this aspect by arguing for two consequences of (...)
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  • Media Temporalities of the Internet: Philosophies of Time and Media in Derrida and Rorty.Mike Sandbothe - 1999 - AI and Society 13 (4):421-434.
    My considerations are organised into four sections. The first section provides a survey of some significant developments that determine contemporary philosophical discussion on the subject of ‘time’. In the second section, I show how the question of time and the issue of media are linked with one another in the views of two influential contemporary philosophers: Jacques Derrida and Richard Rorty. Finally, in the third section, the temporal implications of cultural practices which are developing in the new medium of the (...)
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  • ‘This is My Truth, Tell Me Yours’. Deconstructive Pragmatism as a Philosophy for Education.Gert Biesta - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):710-727.
    One way to characterise pragmatism is to see it as a philosophy that placed communication at the heart of philosophical, educational and political thinking. Whereas the shift from consciousness to communication can be seen as a major innovation in modern philosophy, it is not without problems. This article highlights some of these problems and suggests a way ‘forward’ by staging a discussion between pragmatism and deconstruction. Although there are striking similarities between pragmatism and deconstruction, it is argued that pragmatism and (...)
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  • Dewey, Derrida, and 'the Double Bind'.Jim Garrison - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):349–362.
  • The End(s) of Philosophy: Rhetoric, Therapy and Wittgenstein's Pyrrhonism.Bob Plant - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (3):222–257.
  • The Confessing Animal in Foucault and Wittgenstein.Bob Plant - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):533-559.
    In "The History of Sexuality", Foucault maintains that "Western man has become a confessing animal" (1990, 59), thus implying that "man" was not always such a creature. On a related point, Wittgenstein suggests that "man is a ceremonial animal" (1996, 67); here the suggestion is that human beings are, by their very nature, ritualistically inclined. In this paper I examine this crucial difference in emphasis, first by reconstructing Foucault's "genealogy" of confession, and subsequently by exploring relevant facets of Wittgenstein's later (...)
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  • Derrida on the Death Penalty.Matthias Fritsch - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):56-73.
    Responding to Derrida's Death Penalty Seminar of 1999–2000 and its interpretation by Michael Naas, in this paper I argue that Derrida's deconstruction of the theologico-political concept of the sovereign right over life and death in view of abolishing capital punishment should be understood in terms of the unconditional renunciation of sovereignty that dominates Derrida's later political writings, Rogues (2005) in particular. My reading takes seriously what I call the functional need for a “theological” moment in sovereignty beyond a merely historicist (...)
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  • Private Irony Vs. Social Hope: Derrida, Rorty and the Political.Mark Dooley - 1999 - Cultural Values 3 (3):263-290.
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  • Soft Universalisms: Beyond Young and Rorty on Difference.Gideon Calder - 2006 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (1):3-21.
  • Derridean Deconstruction and the Question of Nature.Makoto Katsumori - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (1):56-74.
    This article inquires into a paradoxical position held by the concept of ‘nature’ in Derrida's thought. While a pivotal part of his project of deconstruction is devoted to a critique of the metaphysical privileging of nature over its others (technics, culture, and so on), the same project also aims at dismantling the hierarchical binary opposition of man/animal. Insofar as the term ‘animal’ or ‘animality’ to a large extent overlaps with nature, these two strands of his thought appear to stand in (...)
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