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  1. Alcibiades, Agis and Spartan Policy.H. D. Westlake - 1938 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 58 (1):31-40.
  • Support of Athenian Intellectuals for Philip: A Study of Isocrates' Philippus and Speusippus' Letter to Philip.Minor Millikin Markle - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:80-99.
  • The Causes and the Outbreak of the Corinthian War.S. Perlman - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (01):64-.
    The causes and the outbreak of the Corinthian war, as well as the events immediately preceding it, have often been discussed by modern historians. Since the Corinthian war is the first attempt at achieving a new settlement in Greece after the Peloponnesian war and since it brought about new political alliances and the revival of old imperial rivalries, it is not only an episode in the continual warfare among the Greek states, but may also be regarded as a key to (...)
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  • Two Notes on Philip of Macedon's First Interventions In Thessaly.Christopher Ehrhardt - 1967 - Classical Quarterly 17 (2):296-301.
    This passage comes at the end of Diodorus' account of the archon year 357/6 and obviously contains a proleptic reference to the future fortunes of the tyrannicides, Tisiphonus, Lycophron,. Tisiphonus died probably in 355 or early in 354; Lycophron and Peitholaus were expelled from Pherae by Philip in 352.
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  • History in [Demosthenes] 59.Jeremy Trevett - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (2):407-420.
    It is well known that Athenian orators, when they made reference to the historical past, usually eschewed prolonged narrative in favour of brief allusions to familiar episodes from Athenian history. Perhaps the most striking exception to this custom is the long and detailed account of fifth-century Plataean history in the pseudo-Demosthenic speech Against Neaera. The main interest of this passage, however, lies not in its divergence from contemporary rhetorical practice, but in its clear reliance on Thucydides for its account of (...)
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