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  1. Purism and the Category of ‘the Aesthetic’: The Drama Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):1-14.
    This paper examines one component of Stephen Mumford’s case for the claim that we should regard sport, art and the aesthetic as more closely connected than has tended to be the case, under the influence of the work of David Best, in recent years. Mumford’s rejection of what I call ‘the drama argument’ is examined in detail and it is argued that all but one element of his case fails to do the job he envisages.
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  • Deception in Sport: A New Taxonomy of Intra-Lusory Guiles.Adam G. Pfleegor & Danny Roesenberg - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):209-231.
    Almost four decades ago, Kathleen Pearson examined deceptive practices in sport using a distinction between strategic and definitional deception. However, the complexity and dynamic nature of sport is not limited to this dual-categorization of deceptive acts and there are other features of deception in sport unaccounted for in Pearson's constructs. By employing Torres’s elucidation of the structure of skills and Suits's concept of the lusory-attitude, a more thorough taxonomy of in-contest sport deception will be presented. Despite the ubiquitous presence of (...)
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  • 'Human-Ness', 'Dehumanisation' and Performance Enhancement.Leon Culbertson - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):195 – 217.
    This paper focuses on the claim by Schneider and Butcher (2000) that it makes little sense to criticise the use of performance-enhancing drugs as ?dehumanising? (as, for example, Hoberman does (1992)) because we are unable to give a satisfactory account of what it is to be human. Schneider and Butcher (2000, 196) put this as follows: ?The dehumanisation argument is interesting but incomplete. It is incomplete because we do not have an agreed-upon conception of what it is to be human. (...)
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  • Being-on-the-Bench: An Existential Analysis of the Substitute in Sport.Emily Ryall - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (1):56 – 70.
    Being a substitute in sport appears to contradict the rationale behind being involved in that sport, especially in those sports whereby substitutes frequently remain unused or are brought on to the field of play for the final moments of that game. For the coach or manager, substitutes function as a way to improve the team achieving a particular end, namely to win the game; whether to replace an injured or tired player, to change a team’s structure or tactics, to complete (...)
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  • Deception in Sport: A New Taxonomy of Intra-Lusory Guiles.Adam G. Pfleegor & Danny Roesenberg - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):209-231.
    Almost four decades ago, Kathleen Pearson examined deceptive practices in sport using a distinction between strategic and definitional deception. However, the complexity and dynamic nature of sport is not limited to this dual-categorization of deceptive acts and there are other features of deception in sport unaccounted for in Pearson's constructs. By employing Torres’s elucidation of the structure of skills and Suits's concept of the lusory-attitude, a more thorough taxonomy of in-contest sport deception will be presented. Despite the ubiquitous presence of (...)
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  • Genetic Enhancement in the Dark.Leon Culbertson - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):140-151.
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