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  1. Feminism as Revolutionary Practice: From Justice and the Politics of Recognition to Freedom.Marieke Borren - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):197-214.
    In the 1980s extra-parliamentary social movements and critical theories of race, class, and gender added a new sociocultural understanding of justice—recognition—to the much older socioeconomic one. The best-known form of the struggle for recognition is the identity politics of disadvantaged groups. I argue that there is still another option to conceptualize their predicament, neglected in recent political philosophy, which understands exclusion not in terms of injustice, more particularly a lack of sociocultural recognition, but in terms of a lack of freedom. (...)
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  • Hannah Arendt, Feminism, and the Politics of Alterity: "What Will We Lose If We Win?".Joanne Cutting-Gray - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):35 - 54.
    Hannah Arendt's early biography of Rahel Varnhagen, an eighteenth-century German-Jew, provides a revolutionary feminist component to her political theory. In it, Arendt grapples with the theoretical constitution of a female subject and relates Jewish alterity, identity, and history to feminist politics. Because she understood the "female condition" of difference as belonging to the political subject rather than an autonomous self, her theory entails a "politics of alterity" with applications for feminist practice.
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  • Hannah Arendt, Feminism, and the Politics of Alterity: “What Will We Lose If We Win?”.Joanne Cutting-Gray - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):35-54.
    Hannah Arendt's early biography of Rahel Varnhagen, an eighteenth-century German-Jew, provides a revolutionary feminist component to her political theory. In it, Arendt grapples with the theoretical constitution of a female subject and relates Jewish alterity, identity, and history to feminist politics. Because she understood the "female condition" of difference as belonging to the political subject rather than an autonomous self, her theory entails a "politics of alterity" with applications for feminist practice.
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