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Tadeusz Czeżowski (1955). On Certain Peculiarities of Singular Propositions.

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  1.  33
    Avicenna on Possibility and Necessity.Saloua Chatti - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (4):332-353.
    In this paper, I raise the following problem: How does Avicenna define modalities? What oppositional relations are there between modal propositions, whether quantified or not? After giving Avicenna's definitions of possibility, necessity and impossibility, I analyze the modal oppositions as they are stated by him. This leads to the following results: The relations between the singular modal propositions may be represented by means of a hexagon. Those between the quantified propositions may be represented by means of two hexagons that one (...)
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  2.  17
    Logical Geometries and Information in the Square of Oppositions.Hans Smessaert & Lorenz Demey - 2014 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (4):527-565.
    The Aristotelian square of oppositions is a well-known diagram in logic and linguistics. In recent years, several extensions of the square have been discovered. However, these extensions have failed to become as widely known as the square. In this paper we argue that there is indeed a fundamental difference between the square and its extensions, viz., a difference in informativity. To do this, we distinguish between concrete Aristotelian diagrams and, on a more abstract level, the Aristotelian geometry. We then introduce (...)
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    Why the Logical Hexagon?Alessio Moretti - 2012 - Logica Universalis 6 (1-2):69-107.
    The logical hexagon (or hexagon of opposition) is a strange, yet beautiful, highly symmetrical mathematical figure, mysteriously intertwining fundamental logical and geometrical features. It was discovered more or less at the same time (i.e. around 1950), independently, by a few scholars. It is the successor of an equally strange (but mathematically less impressive) structure, the “logical square” (or “square of opposition”), of which it is a much more general and powerful “relative”. The discovery of the former did not raise interest, (...)
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  4.  1
    MacColl’s Modes of Modalities.Fabien Schang - 2011 - Philosophia Scientae 15:149-188.
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