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The Driver-car

Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):61-79 (2004)

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  1. RoboDoc: Semiotic Resources for Achieving Face-to-Screenface Formation with a Telepresence Robot.Brian L. Due - 2021 - Semiotica 2021 (238):253-278.
    Face-to-face interaction is a primordial site for human activity and intersubjectivity. Empirical studies have shown how people reflexively exhibit a face orientation and work to establish a formation in which everyone is facing each other in local participation frameworks. The Face has also been described by, e.g., Levinas as the basis for a first ethical philosophy. Humans have established these Face-formations when interacting since time immemorial, but what happens when one of the participants is present through a telepresence robot? Based (...)
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  • Adapting Bodies to Infrastructures.Larissa Schindler - forthcoming - Human Studies:1-22.
    The material interrelations between bodies and objects are a wide, worthwhile and absorbing field, which has not been sufficiently examined yet. Focusing on such interrelations within air travel, this article contributes to the exploration of this field. It delineates that such interrelations do not simply happen, but that they have to be accomplished continuously by different participants with a certain risk to fail at many points. Within mobilities, such processes of interrelating occur under the specific circumstances of a moving vehicle. (...)
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  • Automotive Emotions.Mimi Sheller - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):221-242.
    Car cultures have social, material and, above all, affective dimensions that are overlooked in current strategies to influence car-driving decisions. Car consumption is never simply about rational economic choices, but is as much about aesthetic, emotional and sensory responses to driving, as well as patterns of kinship, sociability, habitation and work. Through a close examination of the aesthetic and especially kinaesthetic dimensions of automobility, this article locates car cultures within a broader physical/material relational setting that includes both human bodies and (...)
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  • Automobilities.Mike Featherstone - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):1-24.
    This wide-ranging introduction to the special issue on Automobilities examines various dimensions of the automobile system and car cultures. In its broadest sense we can think of many automobilities - modes of autonomous, self-directed movement. It can be argued that there are many different car cultures and autoscapes which operate around the world, which cannot be seen as making driving a uniform experience of movement in a controlled 'no-place' space. Yet, there clearly is an increasingly globalizing car system, conceptualized as (...)
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  • Driving Places.Peter Merriman - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):145-167.
    In this article I provide a critical account of the ‘placing’ of England’s M1 motorway. I start by critiquing Marc Augé’s anthropological writings on ‘non-places’ which have provided a common point of reference for academics discussing spaces of travel, consumption and exchange in the contemporary world. I argue that Augé’s ethnology of supermodernity results in a rather partial account of these sites, that he overstates the novelty of contemporary experiences of these spaces, and that he fails to acknowledge the heterogeneity (...)
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  • The Coproduction of “Sustainability”: Negotiated Practices and the Prius.Ritsuko Ozaki, Isabel Shaw & Mark Dodgson - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (4):518-541.
    Much of the debate on sustainability is predicated on the belief that environmental demands lead to the production of sustainable technologies that induce environmental benefits. This fails to account for the influential ways technologies are used in practice, and the interactions between users and technologies that shape their environmental effects. This article uses the example of how cars and their drivers together accomplish the practice of driving through their interactions with each other, and explores the implications this has for generating (...)
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  • Conceptualizing Connections: Energy Demand, Infrastructures and Social Practices.Nicola Spurling, Matt Watson & Elizabeth Shove - 2015 - European Journal of Social Theory 18 (3):274-287.
    Problems of climate change present new challenges for social theory. In this article we focus on the task of understanding and analyzing car dependence, using this as a case through which to introduce and explore what we take to be central but underdeveloped questions about how infrastructures and complexes of social practice connect across space and time. In taking this approach we work with the proposition that forms of energy consumption, including those associated with automobility, are usefully understood as outcomes (...)
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  • Acknowledging Substances: Looking at the Hidden Side of the Material World. [REVIEW]Hans Peter Hahn & Jens Soentgen - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):19-33.
    Material culture, strictly speaking, is substance culture. Nevertheless, studies on material culture are almost exclusively concerned with things. The specificities in the perception of substances and the related everyday practices are rarely taken into consideration. Although this can be explained by the history of anthropology, the bias towards associating material culture with “formed matter” is a foundational shortcoming. In consequence, particular perspectives on the material remain understudied, and the cultural relevance of substances as such is rarely taken into consideration. Taking (...)
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