Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Ethical Consumption, Consumer Self-Governance, and the Later Foucault.Noah Quastel - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (1):25-52.
    ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the later work of Michel Foucault on ethics, freedom, and self-governance as it applies to the ethics of consumption and to new ethical consumerist movements such as fair-trade coffee. Foucault's emphasis on practices of the self helps elucidate the virtue ethics involved in consumption choices. Ethical consumption is cast as a set of practices of self-development: through critical activity and the quest for freedom, persons seek to transform themselves to live in reciprocal relationships with other persons (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ducks, Bogs, and Guns: A Case Study of Stewardship Ethics in Newfoundland.Catherine M. Roach, Tim I. Hollis, Brian E. Mclaren & Dean L. Y. Bavington - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):43-70.
    : Three major strategies exist for the protection of endangered habitat and species: (1) land acquisition programs, (2) government legislation and regulatory agencies, and (3) "stewardship" programs that are voluntary and community-based. While all of these strategies have merit, we suggest that stewardship holds particular advantages and should be considered more often as a strategy of first choice. In this article, we examine the Municipal Wetland Stewardship program of Newfoundland, a popular and successful Canadian policy for the local protection of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ducks, Bogs, and Gunsa Case Study of Stewardship Ethics in Newfoundland.Catherine M. Roach, Tim I. Hollis, Brian E. Mclaren & Dean L. Y. Bavington - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):43-70.
    Three major strategies exist for the protection of endangered habitat and species: land acquisition programs, government legislation and regulatory agencies, and "stewardship" programs that are voluntary and community-based. While all of these strategies have merit, we suggest that stewardship holds particular advantages and should be considered more often as a strategy of first choice. In this article, we examine the Municipal Wetland Stewardship program of Newfoundland, a popular and successful Canadian policy for the local protection of wetlands. Important issues are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Technologies of the Sky: A Socio-Semiotic and Critical Analysis of Televised Weather Discourse.Phillip Vannini & Aaron M. Mccright - 2007 - Critical Discourse Studies 4 (1):49-74.
    We offer a critical reading of televised weather reporting and forecasting discourse. We analyze text obtained from a US affiliate station of The Weather Channel over three days when a winter front advanced through the United States. Our critical analysis reveals the underlying ideological character of weather representation. We interpret the practice of weather representation within the context of the hegemonic discursive orders of leisure, consumption, capital accumulation, and risk management through the technologization of discourse. Through an analysis of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Discourse and Wolves: Science, Society, and Ethics.William S. Lynn - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (1):75-92.
    Wolves have a special resonance in many human cultures. To appreciate fully the wide variety of views on wolves, we must attend to the scientific, social, and ethical discourses that frame our understanding of wolves themselves, as well as their relationships with people and the natural world. These discourses are a configuration of ideas, language, actions, and institutions that enable or constrain our individual and collective agency with respect to wolves. Scientific discourse is frequently privileged when it comes to wolves, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Foucault, the Consumer Culture and Environmental Degradation.Ron Wagler - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (3):331-336.
    Michel Foucault's theories and their relevance to 'consumer culture' and environmental degradation are considered. Specifically, Foucault's theory of power/knowledge and biopower are considered in light of current consumption rates among global consumer cultures and their link to trends in global environmental degradation. Lastly, Foucault's theory of resistance is suggested as a mechanism for environmental sustainability.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ecological Identity Work in Higher Education: Theoretical Perspectives and a Case Study.Jessica S. Hayes-Conroy & Robert M. Vanderbeck - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):309 – 329.
    This paper develops and extends the concept of ecological identity work through an investigation of issues of identity among students studying the environment at one US university. We conceptualize identity work as both an individual and group process through which students locate themselves in relation to particular, relatively preformed ecological identities, while also attempting to redefine the boundaries of ecological identity itself. Using interview and participant observation data we ask what kinds of ecological identity work takes place among students and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Comparative Analysis of the Vision and Mission Statements of International Environmental Organisations.Claudio Campagna & Teresita Fernandez - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (3):369-398.
    The vision and mission statements of 24 environmental organisations were analysed under the premise that the language used in these statements reflects and influences the priorities of their operation. A dominant perspective, hinging on the concept of 'sustainable development', merged the profile of government agencies and non-governmental groups. The language reflected an utilitarian ethics: the environment was more generally portrayed as resources than as nature. Aesthetic remarks were exceptional, even among groups focusing on wildlife. Despite a broadly claimed link between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Stakeholders Pressures and Strategic Prioritisation: An Empirical Analysis of Environmental Responses in Argentinean Firms.D. A. Vazquez-Brust, C. Liston-Heyes, J. A. Plaza-Úbeda & J. Burgos-Jiménez - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S2):171 - 192.
    This article focusses on corporate attitudes to stakeholder environmental pressures in Argentina. It uses a cross section survey of 505 CEOs of Argentinean firms to gather information on environmental attitudes and a stakeholder theory framework to design and interpret the statistical analyses. It is underpinned by theoretical and empirical findings in the literature on stakeholder management, targeting in particular studies that deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Latin America. Its general aim is to gain a deeper empirical understanding of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Ecology and Machinic Thought: Nietzsche, Deleuze, Guattari.Mark Halsey - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (3):33 – 55.
    Not man as the king of creation, but rather as the being who is in intimate contact with the profound life of all forms or all types of beings, who is responsible for even the stars and animal life, and who ceaselessly plugs an organ-machine into an energy-machine, a tree into his body, a breast into his mouth, the sun into his asshole: the eternal custodian of the machines of the universe. Deleuze and Guattari, Anti-Oedipus 4.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bins, Bulbs, and Shower Timers: On the 'Techno-Ethics' of Sustainable Living.Kersty Hobson - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):317 – 336.
    Domestic eco-efficient technologies, such as recycling bins and compact florescent light bulbs, are integral to the eco-modernisation project. To date, however, little research has examined their role in the production of 'sustainable citizens'. In response, this paper explores the productivities of commonplace domestic objects. It draws on qualitative research into a Sydney-based sustainable living programme called 'GreenHome', to examine how participants' environmental ethics became articulated through objects' use. This forges a form of embodied 'techno-ethics' that permeates socio-material relations beyond the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations