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  1. Organoids as Hybrids: Ethical Implications for the Exchange of Human Tissues.Sarah N. Boers, Johannes J. M. Van Delden & Annelien L. Bredenoord - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):131-139.
    Recent developments in biotechnology allow for the generation of increasingly complex products out of human tissues, for example, human stem cell lines, synthetic embryo-like structures and organoids. These developments are coupled with growing commercial interests. Although commercialisation can spark the scientific and clinical promises, profit-making out of human tissues is ethically contentious and known to raise public concern. The traditional bioethical frames of gift versus market are inapt to capture the resulting practical and ethical complexities. Therefore, we propose an alternative (...)
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  • What Do the Various Principles of Justice Mean Within the Concept of Benefit Sharing?Bege Dauda, Yvonne Denier & Kris Dierickx - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):281-293.
    The concept of benefit sharing pertains to the act of giving something in return to the participants, communities, and the country that have participated in global health research or bioprospecting activities. One of the key concerns of benefit sharing is the ethical justifications or reasons to support the practice of the concept in global health research and bioprospecting. This article evaluates one of such ethical justifications and its meaning to benefit sharing, namely justice. We conducted a systematic review to map (...)
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  • Commutative Justice and Access and Benefit Sharing for Genetic Resources.Anna Deplazes-Zemp - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):110-126.
    The Convention on Biological Diversity and its Nagoya Protocol established an Access and Benefit Sharing system between utilizers and providers of genetic resources. ABS is understood as a tool that should promote commutative justice between the involved parties. This essay discusses what exactly it is that is being exchanged in the ABS process. It critically analyses moral claims to compensation that are implied by the ABS system for genetic resources. It argues that with the exception of cases in which traditional (...)
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