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  1. What Do We Owe Refugees: Jus Ad Bellum, Duties to Refugees From Armed Conflict Zones and the Right to Asylum.Jovana Davidovic - 2016 - Journal of Global Ethics 12 (3):347-364.
    In this paper I focus on duties we owe refugees from conflict zones. I argue that it is important to distinguish between two types of duties one might have with respect to refugees from conflict zones. Belligerents from wars that resulted in excess numbers of refugees, I argue, have a stringent duty to remedy past harms and provide for resulting refugees. Other states have a duty to aid which is context-dependent and can be in some cases as stringent as the (...)
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  • Deliberating About Justice: The Role of Justice in the Practical Deliberations of States.Joshua J. Kassner - 2011 - Contemporary Political Theory 10 (2):210-231.
  • On Altruistic War and National Responsibility: Justifying Humanitarian Intervention to Soldiers and Taxpayers.Ned Dobos - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):19-31.
    The principle of absolute sovereignty may have been consigned to history, but a strong presumption against foreign intervention seems to have been left in its stead. On the dominant view, only massacre and ethnic cleansing justify armed intervention, these harms must be already occurring or imminent, and the prudential constraints on war must be satisfied. Each of these conditions has recently come under pressure. Those looking to defend the dominant view have typically done so by invoking international peace and stability, (...)
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  • Is There a Duty to Intervene? Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect.James Pattison - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (6):570-579.
    This article considers the duty to undertake humanitarian intervention. It first examines the arguments for the duty to intervene and questions the possibility of supererogatory humanitarian intervention. It then considers the leading objections to this duty which, it is argued, are largely unpersuasive. In the final section, the article considers the duty to intervene in the context of the responsibility to protect doctrine, which provides the framework within which debates about humanitarian intervention now in large part occur.
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