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  1. Making the Anaesthetised Animal Into a Boundary Object: An Analysis of the 1875 Royal Commission on Vivisection.Tarquin Holmes & Carrie Friese - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-28.
    This paper explores how, at the 1875 Royal Commission on Vivisection, the anaesthetised animal was construed as a boundary object around which “cooperation without consensus” Computer supported cooperative work: cooperation or conflict? Springer, London, 1993) could form, serving the interests of both scientists and animals. Advocates of anaesthesia presented it as benevolently intervening between the scientific agent and animal patient. Such articulations of ‘ethical’ vivisection through anaesthesia were then mandated in the 1876 Cruelty to Animals Act, and thus have had (...)
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  • Animal Research Nexus: A New Approach to the Connections Between Science, Health and Animal Welfare.Gail Davies, Richard Gorman, Beth Greenhough, Pru Hobson-West, Robert G. W. Kirk, Reuben Message, Dmitriy Myelnikov, Alexandra Palmer, Emma Roe, Vanessa Ashall, Bentley Crudgington, Renelle McGlacken, Sara Peres & Tess Skidmore - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (4):499-511.
    Animals used in biological research and testing have become integrated into the trajectories of modern biomedicine, generating increased expectations for and connections between human and animal health. Animal research also remains controversial and its acceptability is contingent on a complex network of relations and assurances across science and society, which are both formally constituted through law and informal or assumed. In this paper, we propose these entanglements can be studied through an approach that understands animal research as a nexus spanning (...)
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  • From The Principles to the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act: A Commentary on How and Why the 3Rs Became Central to Laboratory Animal Governance in the UK.Nathalie Nuyts & Carrie Friese - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (4):742-747.
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  • Science, Culture, and Care in Laboratory Animal Research: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Future of the 3Rs.Robert G. W. Kirk, Pru Hobson-West, Beth Greenhough & Gail Davies - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (4):603-621.
    The principles of the 3Rs—replacement, refinement, and reduction—strongly shape discussion of methods for performing more humane animal research and the regulation of this contested area of technoscience. This special issue looks back to the origins of the 3Rs principles through five papers that explore how it is enacted and challenged in practice and that develop critical considerations about its future. Three themes connect the papers in this special issue. These are the multiplicity of roles enacted by those who use and (...)
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