Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Christian Bioethics in Europe: In Defense Against Reductionist Influences From the United States.P. T. Schotsmans - 2009 - Christian Bioethics 15 (1):17-30.
    Christian ideas have continued to inspire European bioethics until now. The central thesis of this essay is that the open-mindedness of Roman Catholic and other Christian denominations in Europe is crucial for understanding why Christian ethics is so well integrated in the European culture. The essay describes first the institutional frameworks in which these Christian mainly Roman Catholic ideas are developed. It analyzes further the difference between the secular Anglo-American and European bioethics as it has been influenced by these Christian (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • New Casuistry: What’s New?Theo Van Willigenburg - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):152 – 164.
    The aim of this article is to review the recent popularity of casuistry as a model of moral inquiry. I argue that proponents of casuistry do not endorse the particularist epistemology that seems to be implied by their position, and that this is why casuistry does not seem to present something really new in comparison to 'top-down' generalist approaches. I contend that casuistry should develop itself as a (moderately) particularist position and that the challenge for the defender of casuistry is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Towards Improving the Ethics of Ecological Research.G. K. D. Crozier & Albrecht I. Schulte-Hostedde - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (3):577-594.
    We argue that the ecological research community should develop a plan for improving the ethical consistency and moral robustness of the field. We propose a particular ethics strategy—specifically, an ongoing process of collective ethical reflection that the community of ecological researchers, with the cooperation of applied ethicists and philosophers of biology, can use to address the needs we identify. We suggest a particular set of conceptual and analytic tools that, we argue, collectively have the resources to provide an empirically grounded (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Openness with Patients: A Categorical Imperative to Correct an Imbalance.A. Kessel & Michael J. Crawford - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (3):297-304.
    This paper examines the concept of ‘openness with patients’ from the stand-point of the limitations of biomedical ethics. Initially we review contemporary critiques of bioethics and, in particular, of principlism; we relate how other; somewhat neglected, forms of medical ethics can yield useful information and provide moral guidance. The main section of the paper then shows how a bioethical approach to openness misses the social context in our example, the viewpoints of patients; we present some of the increasing wealth of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The 'Redefinition of Death' Debate: Western Concepts and Western Bioethics.Susan Frances Jones & Anthony S. Kessel - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):63-75.
    Biomedicine is a global enterprise constructed upon the belief in the universality of scientific truths. However, despite huge scientific advances over recent decades it has not been able to formulate a specific and universal definition of death: In fact, in its attempt to redefine death, the concept of death appears to have become immersed in ever increasing vagueness and ambiguity. Even more worrisome is that bioethics, in the form of principlism, is also endeavouring to become a global enterprise by claiming (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Openness with Patients: A Categorical Imperative to Correct an Imbalance. [REVIEW]Dr A. Kessel & Dr Michael J. Crawford - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (3):297-304.
    This paper examines the concept of ‘openness with patients’ from the stand-point of the limitations of biomedical ethics. Initially we review contemporary critiques of bioethics and, in particular, of principlism; we relate how other; somewhat neglected, forms of medical ethics can yield useful information and provide moral guidance.The main section of the paper then shows how a bioethical approach to openness misses the social context in our example, the viewpoints of patients; we present some of the increasing wealth of research (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark