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  1. ‘The Business of Ethics and Gender’.A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101-116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624-635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the influence of (...)
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  • Gender and Perceived Fundamental Moral Orientations: An Empirical Study of the Turkish Hotel Industry.Michael K. McCuddy, Musa Pinar, Ibrahim Birkin & Metin Kozak - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):331-349.
    Recent history is replete with scandalous acts and charitable acts within the business community. Unfortunately, scandalous acts seem to occur with greater frequency than charitable acts – at least as reported in the broadcast and print media. An interesting corollary to the incidence of scandalous and charitable acts is the apparent differential involvement of men and women, particularly in scandals. This article explores a possible explanation for the apparent gender differential in involvement in scandals and acts of charity. Drawing on (...)
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  • Business Ethics: The Promise of Neuroscience.Diana C. Robertson, Christian Voegtlin & Thomas Maak - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4):679-697.
    Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research portend well for furthering understanding of many of the fundamental questions in the field of business ethics, both normative and empirical. This article provides an overview of neuroscience methodology and brain structures, and explores the areas in which neuroscience research has contributed findings of value to business ethics, as well as suggesting areas for future research. Neuroscience research is especially capable of providing insight into individual reactions to ethical issues, while also raising challenging normative (...)
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  • A Multifocal and Integrative View of the Influencers of Ethical Attitudes Using Qualitative Configurational Analysis.Nicole A. Celestine, Catherine Leighton & Chris Perryer - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Ethical attitudes and behaviour are complex. This complexity extends to the influencers operating at different levels both outside and within the organisation, and in different combinations for different individuals. There is hence a growing need to understand the proximal and distal influencers of ethical attitudes, and how these operate in concert at the individual, organisational, and societal levels. Few studies have attempted to combine these main research streams and systematically examine their combined impact. The minority of studies that have taken (...)
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  • Attitudes Towards Information Ethics: A View From Egypt.Omar E. M. Khalil & Ahmed A. S. Seleim - 2012 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 10 (4):240-261.
  • Differences in Biases and Compensatory Strategies Across Discipline, Rank, and Gender Among University Academics.Vincent Giorgini, Carter Gibson, Jensen T. Mecca, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Michael D. Mumford, Shane Connelly & Lynn D. Devenport - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1551-1579.
    The study of ethical behavior and ethical decision making is of increasing importance in many fields, and there is a growing literature addressing the issue. However, research examining differences in ethical decision making across fields and levels of experience is limited. In the present study, biases that undermine ethical decision making and compensatory strategies that may aid ethical decision making were identified in a series of interviews with 63 faculty members across six academic fields and three levels of rank as (...)
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  • Attitudes of Management Students Towards Workplace Ethics: A Comparative Study Between South Africa and Cyprus.Adele Thomas, Maria Krambia-Kapardis & Anastasios Zopiatis - 2008 - African Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):1.
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  • Perception and Understanding of Bribery in International Business.Turgut Guvenli & Rajib Sanyal - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (5):333 - 348.
    This study examines attitudes toward bribery in international business and whether such attitudes differ between men and women. Results of surveys of adults studying for careers in international business indicate ambivalent and nuanced attitudes over bribe giving/taking with significant differences by sex with respect to specific hypothetical situations, suggesting a gender gap on matters of bribery. It is recommended that academic curriculum and management development programs stress ethics and legality and focus on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar antibribery (...)
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  • Ethical Judgements: Does Gender Matter?Dale L. Lunsford - 2000 - Teaching Business Ethics 4 (1):1-22.
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  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  • Managers’ Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343-353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • Self-Construal and Unethical Behavior.Irina Cojuharenco, Garriy Shteynberg, Michele Gelfand & Marshall Schminke - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):447-461.
    We suggest that understanding unethical behavior in organizations involves understanding how people view themselves and their relationships with others, a concept known as self-construal. Across multiple studies, employing both field and laboratory settings, we examine the impact of three dimensions of self-construal (independent, relational, and collective) on unethical behavior. Our results show that higher levels of relational self-construal relate negatively to unethical behavior. We also find that differences in levels of relational self for men and women mediate gender differences in (...)
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  • Making Loan Decisions in Banks: Straight From the Gut?Fiona Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):53-63.
    When a business owner approaches a bank for a loan for their business they might hope that a well-established bureaucratic procedure would ensure that their application was processed with stipulated rules and impersonal criteria. They might expect that two bank officials, evaluating the same proposal for a loan, would reach the same decision. However, research shows that both quantifiable data and “gut feelings” are used in the decision. In this research, analysis of interviews with senior managers, and both individual and (...)
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  • Influence of Ethical Ideology on Job Stress.Abhishek Shukla & Rajeev Srivastava - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):233-254.
    The relationship between ethical ideology and job stress appears to be complex. This study is based on a model presented by Forsyth, showing two dimensions that play an important role in ethical evaluation and behavior. Based on a survey of 561 employees of hotel industry in India, ethical ideologies were found to be negatively associated with job stress. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlations and multiple regressions. The result showed that relativism is negatively correlated with job stress. Further, it (...)
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  • Salesperson Perceptions of Ethical Behaviors: Their Influence on Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intentions. [REVIEW]Charles Pettijohn, Linda Pettijohn & A. J. Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):547 - 557.
    In the academic world, research has indicated that "good ethics is good business." Such research seems to indicate that firms, which emphasize ethical values and social responsibilities, tend to be more profitable than others. Generally, the profitability is credited to the firm's positive relationships with its customers, reduced costs of attempting to rebuild a tranished image, ease of attracting capital, etc. The research conducted in this study evaluated salespeople's perceptions of the ethics of business in general, their employer's ethics, their (...)
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  • The Ethical Decision Making of Men and Women Executives in International Business Situations.Sean R. Valentine & Terri L. Rittenburg - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (2):125-134.
    While a number of studies have examined the impact of gender/sex on ethical decision-making, the findings of this body of research do not provide consistent answers. Furthermore, very few of these studies have incorporated cross-cultural samples. Consequently, this study of 222 American and Spanish business executives explored sex differences in ethical judgments and intentions to act ethically. While no significant differences between males and females were found with respect to ethical judgments, females exhibited higher intentions to act more ethically than (...)
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  • Digital Piracy: Factors That Influence Attitude Toward Behavior.Sulaiman Al-Rafee & Timothy Paul Cronan - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):237-259.
    A new form of software piracy known as digital piracy has taken the spotlight. Lost revenues due to digital piracy could reach $5 billion by the end of 2005.Preventives and deterrents do not seem to be working – losses are increasing. This study examines factors that influence an individual’s attitude toward pirating digital material. The results of this study suggest that attitude toward digital pirating is influenced by beliefs about the outcome of behavior (cognitive beliefs), happiness and excitement (affective beliefs), (...)
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  • Ethical Ideology and Ethical Judgments in the Portuguese Accounting Profession.Pedro Augusto Marques & José Azevedo-Pereira - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):227-242.
    The purpose of the present study is to examine the attitudes of Portuguese chartered accountants with respect to questions of ethical nature that can arise in their professional activity. Respondents were asked to respond to the Ethics Position Questionnaire developed by Forsyth (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 39(1), 175–184, 1980), in order to determine their idealism and relativism levels. Subsequently, they answered questions about five scenarios related to accounting practices, with the objective of measuring their ethical judgments. Based on (...)
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  • An Empirical Alternative to Sidani and Thornberry’s ‘Current Arab Work Ethic’: Examining the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile in an Arab Context.James C. Ryan & Syed A. A. Tipu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (1):177-198.
    While the concept of work ethic has been discussed in the Arab context :35–49, 2009), the significant conceptual and methodological limitations of the existing work ethic and work value research elucidate the need for a more robust investigation of the multidimensional work ethic construct in the Arab context. Multidimensionality of the work ethic concept has gained considerable attention in recent years as researchers attempt to move away from the religiously labeled Islamic and Protestant work ethic conceptualizations. The current study examines (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Ethics Judgment of Marketing Professionals in the United States.Daulatram B. Lund - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):501-515.
    This empirical investigation reexamines the impact of gender on ethics judgment of marketing professionals in a cross-section of firms in the United States. In the study, gender differences in ethics judgment focus on decisions in the context of marketing-mix elements (product, promotion, pricing, and distribution). The results of statistical analyses indicate that men and women marketing professionals differ significantly in their ethics judgment. Overall, female marketing professionals evinced significantly higher ethics judgment than their male counterparts. Given the changing demographics of (...)
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  • Exposure to Ethics Education and the Perception of Linkage Between Organizational Ethical Behavior and Business Outcomes.Harsh K. Luthar & Ranjan Karri - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):353-368.
    This study focused on the effects of individual characteristics and exposure to ethics education on perceptions of the linkage between organizational ethical practices and business outcomes. Using a stratified sampling approach, 817 students were randomly selected from a population of approximately 1310 business students in an AACSB accredited college of business. Three hundred and twenty eight of the subjects were freshmen, 380 were seniors, and 109 were working managers and professionals enrolled in a night-time MBA program. Overall, the respondents included (...)
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  • The Role of Individual Variables, Organizational Variables and Moral Intensity Dimensions in Libyan Management Accountants’ Ethical Decision Making.Ahmed Musbah, Christopher J. Cowton & David Tyfa - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):335-358.
    This study investigates the association of a broad set of variables with the ethical decision making of management accountants in Libya. Adopting a cross-sectional methodology, a questionnaire including four different ethical scenarios was used to gather data from 229 participants. For each scenario, ethical decision making was examined in terms of the recognition, judgment and intention stages of Rest’s model. A significant relationship was found between ethical recognition and ethical judgment and also between ethical judgment and ethical intention, but ethical (...)
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  • Competitive Bluffing: An Examination of a Common Practice and its Relationship with Performance.Rebecca M. Guidice, G. Stoney Alder & Steven E. Phelan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):535-553.
    Bluffing, a common and consequential form of competitive behavior, has been comparably ignored in the management literature, even though misleading one's rivals is suggested to be an advantageous skill in a multifaceted and highly competitive environment. To address this deficiency and advance scholarship on competitive dynamics, our study investigates the moral reasoning behind competitive bluffing and, using a simulated market-entry game, examines the performance effects of bluffing. Findings suggest that decision makers' views on the ethicality of bluffing competitors differ from (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making and Leadership: Merging Social Role and Self-Construal Perspectives.Crystal L. Hoyt & Terry L. Price - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):531-539.
    This research extends our understanding of ethical decision making on the part of leaders by merging social role and self-construal perspectives. Interdependent self-construal is generally seen as enhancing concern for justice and moral values. Across two studies, we tested the prediction that non-leading group members’ interdependent self-construal would be associated with lower levels of unethical decision making on behalf of their group but that, in contrast, this relationship would be weaker for leaders, given their social role. These predictions were experimentally (...)
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  • Alliance Network Centrality, Board Composition, and Corporate Social Performance.Craig D. Macaulay, Orlando C. Richard, Mike W. Peng & Maria Hasenhuttl - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):997-1008.
    What critical characteristics do firms have that determine the scale and scope of corporate social responsibility activities they undertake? This paper examines two disparate predictors of corporate social performance. First, using the lens of the resource-based view, we examine the role of alliance network centrality on corporate social performance. We find that centrality enhances corporate social performance. Second, we investigate how board composition affects corporate social performance. Specifically, drawing on stakeholder theory, we find that the percentage of female directors predicts (...)
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  • Ethical Decision Making with Information Systems Students.Samer Alhawari & Amine Nehari Talet - 2011 - International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education 1 (2):41-53.
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  • Gender Differences in Double Standards.Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):281 - 295.
    The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the use of double standards in ethical judgements of questionable conduct instigated by business or consumers. We investigate if consumers are more critical towards unethical corporate versus consumer actions and if these double standards depend on the gender of the respondent. In the first study, we compared evaluations of four specific unethical actions [cfr. DePaulo, 1987, in: J. Saegert (ed.) Proceedings of the Division of Consumer Psychology (American Psychological (...)
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  • The Role of Gender and Age in Business Students’ Values, CSR Attitudes, and Responsible Management Education: Learnings From the PRME International Survey.Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Mehrdokht Pournader & Andrew McKinnon - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):219-239.
    As demand grows from various stakeholders for responsible management education in business schools, it is essential to understand how corporate social responsibility and RME are perceived by various subgroups of business students. Following the principles of theories on moral orientation and moral development, we examined the role of gender and age in determining four indicators of business students’ moral approach in the context of business schools committed to RME and CSR. Based on nearly 1300 responses to a survey, conducted with (...)
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  • An Examination of the Association Between Gender and Reporting Intentions for Fraudulent Financial Reporting.Steven Kaplan, Kurt Pany, Janet Samuels & Jian Zhang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):15-30.
    We report the results of a study that examines the association between gender and individuals’ intentions to report fraudulent financial reporting using non-anonymous and anonymous reporting channels. In our experimental study, we examine whether reporting intentions in response to discovering a fraudulent financial reporting act are associated with the participants’ gender, the perpetrator’s gender, and/or the interaction between the participants’ and perpetrator’s gender. We find that female participants’ reporting intentions for an anonymous channel are higher than for male participants; the (...)
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  • How Strong Are the Ethical Preferences of Senior Business Executives?T. K. Das - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):69-80.
    How do senior business executives rank their preferences for various ethical principles? And how strongly do the executives believe in these principles? Also, how do these preference rankings relate to the way the executives see the future (wherein business decisions play out)? Research on these questions may provide us with an appreciation of the complexities of ethical behavior in management beyond the traditional issues concerning ethical decision-making in business. Based on a survey of 585 vice presidents of U.S. businesses it (...)
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  • The Business of Ethics and Gender.A. Catherine McCabe, Rhea Ingram & Mary Conway Dato-on - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):101 - 116.
    Unethical decision-making behavior within organizations has received increasing attention over the past ten years. As a result, a plethora of studies have examined the relationship between gender and business ethics. However, these studies report conflicting results as to whether or not men and women differ with regards to business ethics. In this article, we propose that gender identity theory [Spence: 1993, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 64, 624–635], provides both the theory and empirical measures to explore the influence of (...)
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  • The Relative Importance of Ethics as a Selection Criterion for Entry-Level Public Accountants: Does Gender Make a Difference?Nabil Ibrahim & John Angelidis - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):49 - 58.
    This paper examines public accountants' perceptions of the relative importance of business ethics as a selection criterion for entry-level public accounting positions. Also, it seeks to determine whether gender differences do exist with respect to these perceptions. The data were collected through a survey of 335 professional accountants in four southeastern states. The results show that, among the eight selection factors that were studied, technical competence in accounting, communication skills, and interpersonal skills were the most influential, while professionalism and leadership (...)
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  • Managers' Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343 - 353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • Uncharted Territory: Investigating Individual Business Ethics in Cyprus.Maria Krambia-Kapardis & Anastasios Zopiatis - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (2):138–148.
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  • Professionals' Tax Liability Assessments and Ethical Evaluations in an Equitable Relief Innocent Spouse Case.Gary Fleischman & Sean Valentine - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):27-44.
    This study used a national sample of professionals and a questionnaire containing equitable relief vignettes to explore whether the new equitable relief subset of the revised innocent spouse rules is helpful to the IRS when making relief decisions. The study also addressed the ethical and gender issues associated with equitable relief innocent spouse cases. The results suggested that several equitable relief factors are useful as discriminators in the relief decision. The results also demonstrated that the recognition of an ethical issue (...)
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  • Uncharted Territory: Investigating Individual Business Ethics in Cyprus.Maria Krambia-Kapardis & Anastasios Zopiatis - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (2):138-148.
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  • Improving Consistency for DIT Results Using Cluster Analysis.Carmel Herington & Scott Weaven - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):499-514.
    In this article, cluster analysis is used to explore the conflicting results reported when the Defining Issues Test is used to explain moral reasoning ability in business situations. Using a convenience sample, gender, age, work experience, and ethics training were examined to determine their impact on the level of moral reasoning ability as measured by the Defining Issues Test. Using the whole sample, a significant difference was found for average P scores reported for males and females, but no significant differences (...)
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  • A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375-413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  • Gender Differences in Ethics Research: The Importance of Controlling for the Social Desirability Response Bias. [REVIEW]Derek Dalton & Marc Ortegren - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):73-93.
    Gender is one of the most frequently studied variables within the ethics literature. In prior studies that find gender differences, females consistently report more ethical responses than males. However, prior research also indicates that females are more prone to responding in a socially desirable fashion. Consequently, it is uncertain whether gender differences in ethical decision-making exist because females are more ethical or perhaps because females are more prone to the social desirability response bias. Using a sample of 30 scenarios from (...)
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  • The Ethical Decision Making of Men and Women Executives in International Business Situations.Sean R. Valentine & Terri L. Rittenburg - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (2):125 - 134.
    While a number of studies have examined the impact of gender/sex on ethical decision-making, the findings of this body of research do not provide consistent answers. Furthermore, very few of these studies have incorporated cross-cultural samples. Consequently, this study of 222 American and Spanish business executives explored sex differences in ethical judgments and intentions to act ethically. While no significant differences between males and females were found with respect to ethical judgments, females exhibited higher intentions to act more ethically than (...)
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  • Deceit, Misuse and Favours: Understanding and Measuring Attitudes to Ethics.Chris Perryer & Brenda Scott-Ladd - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (1):123-134.
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