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  1. Solidarity in Academia and its Relationship to Academic Integrity.Jolanta Bieliauskaitė - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (3):309-322.
    This paper provides the theoretical analysis of forms of solidarity in academia and its relationship to academic integrity. This analysis is inspired by the Guidelines for an Institutional Code of Ethics in Higher Education drawn up by the International Association of Universities and the Magna Charta Observatory. These Guidelines refer to the principle of solidarity in the context of international cooperation between higher education institutions. However, the author of this paper believes that this principle might also be used in a (...)
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  • From Human Tissue to Human Bodies: Donation, Interventions and Justified Distinctions?M. Quigley - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (2):73-78.
    This article reviews the latest report from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, Human Bodies: Donation for Medicine and Research. It argues that the report represents a notable evolution in the Council's position regarding the appropriate governance of the human body and biomaterials. It then goes on to examine in more depth one of the report's recommendations – that a pilot payment scheme for eggs for research purposes should be trialled. In particular, it looks at whether the distinctions drawn, first, between (...)
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  • Discourse on the Idea of Sustainability: With Policy Implications for Health and Welfare Reform.Ming-Jui Yeh - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):155-163.
    Sustainability has become a major goal of domestic and international development. This essay analyzes the transitions of normative ideas embedded in the notion of sustainability by reviewing the discourses in the representative reports and literature from different periods. Three sets of ideas are proposed: inter- and intra-generational equity, stability of public systems, and a sense of solidarity, which confirms the scope of community and functions as a precondition for the previous two ideas. This essay uses the case of a health (...)
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  • Molecular Typing: Use with Care.E. Fanoy & A. De Neeling - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):313-314.
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  • Understanding Solidarity (With a Little Help From Your Friends): Response to Dawson and Verweij.B. Prainsack & A. Buyx - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (2):206-210.
    In this paper we respond to Angus Dawson’s and Marcel Verweij’s recent editorial on ‘Solidarity: A Moral Concept in need of Clarification’. While Dawson’s and Verweij’s call for a broader solidarity-based research agenda is highly timely, their critique of our Report on ‘Solidarity as an Emerging Concept in Bioethics’ (2011) is based on some mistaken assumptions and misinterpretations of our arguments. These are (1) a fundamental misunderstanding of the importance of practice in our conceptualisation of solidarity; (2) a misinterpreration of (...)
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  • Two Conceptions of Solidarity in Health Care.L. Chad Horne - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
    In this paper, I distinguish two conceptions of solidarity, which I call solidarity as beneficence and solidarity as mutual advantage. I argue that only the latter is capable of providing a complete foundation for national universal health care programs. On the mutual advantage account, the rationale for universal insurance is parallel to the rationale for a labor union’s “closed shop” policy. In both cases, mandatory participation is necessary in order to stop individuals free-riding on an ongoing system of mutually advantageous (...)
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  • The Ethics of Engaged Presence: A Framework for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Development Work.Matthew R. Hunt, Lisa Schwartz, Christina Sinding & Laurie Elit - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):47-55.
    In this article, we present an ethics framework for health practice in humanitarian and development work: the ethics of engaged presence. The ethics of engaged presence framework aims to articulate in a systematic fashion approaches and orientations that support the engagement of expatriate health care professionals in ways that align with diverse obligations and responsibilities, and promote respectful and effective action and relationships. Drawn from a range of sources, the framework provides a vocabulary and narrative structure for examining the moral (...)
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  • Beyond Surviving to Thriving: The Case for a ‘Compassion Towards Thriving’ Approach in Public Mental Health Ethics.Phil Bielby - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phab023.
    In this article, I argue for a novel understanding of compassion—what I call a ‘compassion towards thriving’ approach—to inform public mental health ethics. The argument is developed through two main parts. In the first part, I develop an account of compassion towards thriving that builds upon Martha Nussbaum’s philosophical work on compassion. This account expands the ambit of compassion from a focus on the alleviation of existing suffering to the prevention of potential future suffering through the facilitation of personal growth (...)
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  • Ethics of Reproductive Genetic Carrier Screening: From the Clinic to the Population.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phab017.
    Reproductive genetic carrier screening is increasingly being offered more widely, including to people with no family history or otherwise elevated chance of having a baby with a genetic condition. There are valid reasons to reject a prevention-focused public health ethics approach to such screening programs. Rejecting the prevention paradigm in this context has led to an emphasis on more individually-focused values of freedom of choice and fostering reproductive autonomy in RCS. We argue, however, that population-wide RCS has sufficient features in (...)
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  • Mental Wellbeing in a Pandemic: The Role of Solidarity and Care.Hui Yun Chan - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    COVID-19 deeply affects many spheres of life. Lockdown measures implemented worldwide have accentuated mental wellbeing changes in the population from the perspectives of space and social relations. These changes leave lasting imprints on individuals and communities. This article draws upon solidarity and care ethics in exploring their role in rebuilding mental wellbeing in the light of constraints arising from lockdown. The diversity of responses to physical and social isolation during the pandemic illuminates the distinctly relational nature of human beings, offering (...)
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  • Professional Solidarity: The Case of Influenza Immunization.Mariëtte van den Hoven & Marcel Verweij - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (9):51 - 52.
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  • Solidarity with Whom? The Boundary Problem and the Ethical Origins of Solidarity of the Health System in Taiwan.Ming-Jui Yeh & Chia-Ming Chen - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (2):176-192.
    Publicly-funded health systems, including those national health services and social or National Health Insurances, are institutionalized solidarity in health. In Europe, solidarity originated from the legacies of labor movements, the Judeo-Christian traditions, and nationalist sentiments in the re-construction Era after the WWII. In middle-to-high income East Asian countries, such as Japan, Taiwan, Korea, the health systems were built on different grounds and do not have such ethical origins of solidarity. As health systems in Europe and East Asia are both facing (...)
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  • Medical Need: Evaluating a Conceptual Critique of Universal Health Coverage.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):114-137.
    Some argue that the concept of medical need is inadequate to inform the design of a universal health care system—particularly an institutional rather than a residual system. They argue that the concept contradicts the idea of comprehensiveness; leads to unsustainable expenditures; is too indeterminate for policy; and supports only a prioritarian distribution. I argue that ‘comprehensive’ understood as ‘including the full continuum of care’ and ‘medically necessary’ understood as ‘prioritized by medical criteria’ are not contradictory, and that UHC is a (...)
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  • Concierge, Wellness, and Block Fee Models of Primary Care: Ethical and Regulatory Concerns at the Public–Private Boundary.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):151-167.
    In bioethics and health policy, we often discuss the appropriate boundaries of public funding; how the interface of public and private purchasers and providers should be organized and regulated receives less attention. In this paper, I discuss ethical and regulatory issues raised at this interface by three medical practice models in which physicians provide insured services while requiring or requesting that patients pay for services or for the non-insured services of the physicians themselves or their associates. This choice for such (...)
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  • Thinking Ethical and Regulatory Frameworks in Medicine From the Perspective of Solidarity on Both Sides of the Atlantic.Barbara Prainsack & Alena Buyx - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):489-501.
    This article provides a concise overview of the history of scholarship on solidarity in Europe and North America. While recent decades have seen an increase in conceptual and scholarly interest in solidarity in North America and other parts of the Anglo-Saxon world, the concept is much more strongly anchored in Europe. Continental European politics in particular have given rise to two of the most influential traditions of solidarity, namely, socialism and Christian ethics. Solidarity has also guided important public instruments and (...)
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  • Breaking the Cycle: Solidarity with Care-Leaver Mothers.Jenny Krutzinna - 2021 - Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies 7 (2):82-92.
    A significant proportion of child protection cases involve care-experienced mothers, which reveals a continuous cycle of mothers who lose their children to social services after having been in state care themselves as children. While the importance of protecting children requires little explanation and forms the justificatory basis for child protection interventions, it is important to remember that care-experienced mothers were once children entrusted to the state’s care, and who arguably have been failed by the state in that their parenting opportunities (...)
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  • Global Health Solidarity.Peter G. N. West-Oram & Alena Buyx - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (2).
    For much of the 20th century, vulnerability to deprivations of health has often been defined by geographical and economic factors. Those in wealthy, usually ‘Northern’ and ‘Western’, parts of the world have benefited from infrastructures, and accidents of geography and climate, which insulate them from many serious threats to health. Conversely, poorer people are typically exposed to more threats to health, and have lesser access to the infrastructures needed to safeguard them against the worst consequences of such exposure. However, in (...)
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  • The Ethical Significance of Antimicrobial Resistance.Jasper Littmann & A. M. Viens - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (3):209-224.
    In this paper, we provide a state-of-the-art overview of the ethical challenges that arise in the context of antimicrobial resistance, which includes an introduction to the contributions to the symposium in this issue. We begin by discussing why AMR is a distinct ethical issue, and should not be viewed purely as a technical or medical problem. In the second section, we expand on some of these arguments and argue that AMR presents us with a broad range of ethical problems that (...)
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  • Exploring Users’ Perceptions and Senses of Solidarity in Taiwan’s National Health Insurance.Ming-Jui Yeh - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):1-14.
    Under the influence of concerns about sustainability, health system reforms have targeted institutional designs and have overlooked the role of socio-political factors like solidarity—a concept that is generally assumed to underpin the redistributive health system. The purpose of this research is to investigate users’ perceptions of the National Health Insurance as a system, their senses of solidarity and their views on the sustainability of the system in Taiwan. Using the descriptive ethics approach, qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with typical case (...)
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  • Is Israel Its Brother’s Keeper? Responsibility and Solidarity in the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict.Zohar Lederman, Emily Shepp & Shmuel Lederman - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (1):103-120.
    This article examines the Israeli government’s role in supporting living conditions conducive to health in the occupied Palestinian territories. Limiting the discussion to public health, the authors argue that—whether justified in its overall political policy—the Israeli government and people are legally and ethically obligated to care for the well-being of the Palestinian people. The authors first review the current situation in the OPT and compare health statistics with Israel. Next, the authors make three arguments as to why the Israeli government (...)
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  • Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health.Meena Krishnamurthy - 2013 - Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.
    n this paper, I argue that political solidarity is important to justice. At its core, political solidarity is a relational concept. To be in a relation of political solidarity, is to be in a relation of connection or unity with one’s fellow citizens. I argue that fellow citizens can be said to stand in such a relation when they have attitudes of collective identification, mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual support and loyalty toward one another. I argue that political solidarity, (...)
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  • A Solidaristic Approach to Workers’ Compensation Reform in Taiwan.Ming-Jui Yeh - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (3):261-273.
    The workers’ compensation system in Taiwan cannot provide sufficient coverage for all workers. This essay adopts a solidaristic approach to address this issue by analyzing the reasons why workers’ compensation is underdeveloped in Taiwan and what could be done to persuade more key actors to support the reform for a more just policy arrangement. First, through comparison with the healthcare system, it is argued that the lack of solidarity and the perception of relevant similarities could explain the underdevelopment of workers’ (...)
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  • Restricting Health Worker Migration in the Name of Solidarity.Jeremy Snyder - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):4-12.
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  • How Do ‘Public’ Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men’s Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices: Table 1.Rod Knight, Will Small & Jean Shoveller - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):264-275.
    Philosophical arguments stemming from the public health ethics arena suggest that public health interventions ought to be subject to normative inquiry that considers relational values, including concepts such as solidarity, reciprocity and health equity. As yet, however, the extent to which ‘public’ values influence the ‘autonomous’ decisions of the public remains largely unexplored. Drawing on interviews with 50 men in Vancouver, Canada, this study employs a critical discourse analysis to examine participants’ decisions and motivations to voluntarily access HIV testing and/or (...)
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  • The Role of Socially Embedded Concepts in Breast Cancer Screening: An Empirical Study with Australian Experts.Lisa M. Parker & Stacy M. Carter - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):276-289.
    It is not clear whether breast cancer screening is a public health intervention or an individual clinical service. The question is important because the concepts best suited for ethical reasoning in public health might be different to the concepts commonly employed in biomedical ethics. We consider it likely that breast screening has elements of a public health intervention and used an empirical ethics approach to explore this further. If breast screening has public health characteristics, it is probable that policy and (...)
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  • Hope, Dying and Solidarity.Anthony Wrigley - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):187-204.
    Hope takes on a particularly important role in end of life situations. Sustaining hope can have considerable benefits for the quality of life and any prospect of a good death for the dying. However, it has proved difficult to adequately account for hope when dying, particularly in some of the more extreme end of life situations. Standard secular accounts of hope struggle to establish how the fostering of hope may be possible in such situations. This leads to a practical ethical (...)
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  • Disruptive Solidarity or Solidarity Disrupted? A Dialogical Narrative Analysis of Economically Vulnerable Older Adults' Efforts to Age in Place with Pets.Ann M. Toohey & Melanie J. Rock - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):15-29.
    Over one-third of older adults in many countries have a companion animal, and pets may harbor health-promoting potential. Few studies have considered pet-ownership in relation to economic vulnerability, and pet-ownership has not been often considered within policy efforts to promote ageing-in-place. We conducted a mixed methods case study to understand perspectives of both community agencies that support ageing-in-place and older adults themselves. A shortage of affordable, appropriate pet-friendly housing emerged as a challenge, even when framed as a legitimate choice and (...)
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