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  1. Counting Incompossibles.Peter Fritz & Jeremy Goodman - 2017 - Mind 126 (504):1063–1108.
    We often speak as if there are merely possible people—for example, when we make such claims as that most possible people are never going to be born. Yet most metaphysicians deny that anything is both possibly a person and never born. Since our unreflective talk of merely possible people serves to draw non-trivial distinctions, these metaphysicians owe us some paraphrase by which we can draw those distinctions without committing ourselves to there being merely possible people. We show that such paraphrases (...)
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  • Darwinism and Meaning.Lonnie W. Aarssen - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):296-311.
    Darwinism presents a paradox. It discredits the notion that one’s life has any intrinsic meaning, yet it predicts that we are designed by Darwinian natural selection to generally insist that it must—and so necessarily designed to misunderstand and doubt Darwinism. The implications of this paradox are explored here, including the question of where then does the Darwinist find meaning in life? The main source, it is proposed, is from cognitive domains for meaning inherited from sentient ancestors—domains that reveal our evolved (...)
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  • Life, Information, Entropy, and Time: Vehicles for Semantic Inheritance.Antony R. Crofts - 2007 - Complexity 13 (1):14-50.
  • Charles Darwin y el 'desencantamiento' weberiano.Bárbara Jiménez Pazos - 2017 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 71:95-106.
    Este artículo pretende poner de manifiesto una interrelación permanente entre dos metáforas darwinianas como “la orilla enmarañada”, presente en On the Origin of Species, y la relativa al “daltonismo”, mencionada en Autobiography, para demostrar la dudosa consistencia de interpretaciones que defienden un “encanto” secular latente en la Teoría de la Evolución y descartan un “desencanto”, en términos weberianos.
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  • Superstition and Belief as Inevitable by-Products of an Adaptive Learning Strategy.Jan Beck & Wolfgang Forstmeier - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (1):35-46.
    The existence of superstition and religious beliefs in most, if not all, human societies is puzzling for behavioral ecology. These phenomena bring about various fitness costs ranging from burial objects to celibacy, and these costs are not outweighed by any obvious benefits. In an attempt to resolve this problem, we present a verbal model describing how humans and other organisms learn from the observation of coincidence (associative learning). As in statistical analysis, learning organisms need rules to distinguish between real patterns (...)
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  • Sami Pihlström, Pragmatist Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Pär Engholm - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (3):388-394.
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  • Informational Darwinism.Arthur B. Cody - 2000 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):167 – 179.
    The Theory of Evolution has, since Darwin, been sustained by contributions from many sciences, most especially from molecular biology. Philosophers, like biologists and the man in the street, have accepted the idea that the contemporary form of evolutionary theory has arrived at a convincing and final structure. As it now stands, natural selection is thought to work through the information-handling mechanism of the DNA molecule. Variation in the genome?s constructive message is achieved through random errors of processing called mutations. How (...)
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  • Robots With Internal Models A Route to Machine Consciousness?Owen Holland & Rod Goodman - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4-5):4-5.
    We are engineers, and our view of consciousness is shaped by an engineering ambition: we would like to build a conscious machine. We begin by acknowledging that we may be a little disadvantaged, in that consciousness studies do not form part of the engineering curriculum, and so we may be starting from a position of considerable ignorance as regards the study of consciousness itself. In practice, however, this may not set us back very far; almost a decade ago, Crick wrote: (...)
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  • Religion on Which the Devout and Skeptic Can Agree.Matt J. Rossano - 2007 - Zygon 42 (2):301-316.
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  • Perceived Consequences of Evolution: College Students Perceive Negative Personal and Social Impact in Evolutionary Theory.Sarah K. Brem, Michael Ranney & Jennifer Schindel - 2003 - Science Education 87 (2):181-206.
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  • Sender-Receiver Systems Within and Between Organisms.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (5):866-878.
    Drawing on models of communication due to Lewis and Skyrms, I contrast sender-receiver systems as they appear within and between organisms, and as they function in the bridging of space and time. Within the organism, memory can be seen as the sending of messages over time, communication between stages as opposed to spatial parts. Psychological memory and genetic memory are compared with respect to their relations to a sender-receiver model. Some puzzles about “genetic information” can be resolved by seeing the (...)
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  • Gadow's Romanticism: Science, Poetry and Embodiment in Postmodern Nursing.M. A. Paley - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):112–126.
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  • What It Means to Live in a Virtual World Generated by Our Brain.Jan Westerhoff - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (3):507-528.
    Recent discussions in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind have defended a theory according to which we live in a virtual world akin to a computer simulation, generated by our brain. It is argued that our brain creates a model world from a variety of stimuli; this model is perceived as if it was external and perception-independent, even though it is neither of the two. The view of the mind, brain, and world, entailed by this theory has some peculiar (...)
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  • The Wonder of Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Evan Selinger - 2004 - Human Studies 27 (1):117-112.
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  • Buddhist Practice and Educational Endeavour: In Search of a Secular Spirituality for State-Funded Education in England.Terry Hyland - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (3):241-252.
    A case is made here for a secular interpretation of spirituality to place against more orthodox religious versions which are currently gaining ground in English education as part of the government policy designed to encourage schools to apply for ‘academy’ status independent of local authority control. Given the rise of faith-based ‘free’ schools, it is important to provide a secular alternative as a foundation for morality and spirituality in the interests of maintaining state-funded institutions characterised by rationality and autonomy rather (...)
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  • Is Altruism Good? Evolution, Ethics, and the Hunger for Theology.Nancey Murphy - 2006 - Zygon 41 (4):985-994.
  • Affirmations After God: Friedrich Nietzsche and Richard Dawkins on Atheism.J. Thomas Howe - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):140-155.
    Abstract. In this essay, I compare the atheism of Friedrich Nietzsche with that of Richard Dawkins. My purpose is to describe certain differences in their respective atheisms with the intent of showing that Nietzsche's atheism contains a richer and fuller affirmation of human life. In Dawkins’s presentation of the value of life without God, there is a naïve optimism that purports that human beings, educated in science and purged of religion, will find lives of easy peace and comfortable wonder. Part (...)
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  • The Beautiful and the Sublime in Natural Science.Peter K. Walhout - 2009 - Zygon 44 (4):757-776.
    The various aesthetic phenomena found repeatedly in the scientific enterprise stem from the role of God as artist. If the Creator is an artist, how and why natural scientists study the divine art work can be understood using theological aesthetics and the philosophy of art. The aesthetic phenomena considered here are as follows. First, science reveals beauty and the sublime in natural phenomena. Second, science discovers beauty and the sublime in the theories that are developed to explain natural phenomena. Third, (...)
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  • Gadow's Romanticism: Science, Poetry and Embodiment in Postmodern Nursing.John Paley - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):112-126.
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  • The Modern Study of Myth and its Relation to Science.Robert A. Segal - 2015 - Zygon 50 (3):757-771.
    The history of the modern study of myth can be divided into two main categories: that which sees myth as the primitive counterpart to natural science, itself considered overwhelmingly modern, and that which sees myth as almost anything but the primitive counterpart to natural science. The first category constitutes the nineteenth-century approach to myth. The second category constitutes the twentieth-century approach. Tylor and Frazer epitomize the nineteenth-century view. Malinowski, Eliade, Bultmann, Jonas, Camus, Freud, and Jung epitomize the twentieth-century approach. The (...)
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  • Organized Skepticism, Naïve Methodism, and Other -Isms.Jay A. Labinger - 2006 - Foundations of Chemistry 8 (2):97-110.
    The Science Wars have pitted defenders of science against those accused of attacking it with the weapons of constructivism and relativism. I argue that this defensive stance is in large part a consequence of two other -isms, organized skepticism and naïve methodism, that play a significant, if mostly unconscious, role in how scientists tend to think about science, and suggest that increased awareness of these -isms may help dissipate the perceptions of hostility.
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  • Experiencing Wonder and Seeking Wisdom.Celia Deane-Drummond - 2007 - Zygon 42 (3):587-590.
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