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  1. Testimony and Proof in Early-Modern England.R. W. Serjeantson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 30 (2):195-236.
  • Keplerian Illusions: Geometrical Pictures "Vs" Optical Images in Kepler's Visual Theory.Antoni Malet - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (1):1.
  • Rethinking Kant's Fact of Reason.Owen Ware - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    Kant’s doctrine of the Fact of Reason is one of the most perplexing aspects of his moral philosophy. The aim of this paper is to defend Kant’s doctrine from the common charge of dogmatism. My defense turns on a previously unexplored analogy to the notion of ‘matters of fact’ popularized by members of the Royal Society in the seventeenth century. In their work, ‘facts’ were beyond doubt, often referring to experimental effects one could witness first hand. While Kant uses the (...)
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  • Seeing and Believing: Galileo, Aristotelians, and the Mountains on the Moon.David Marshall Miller - 2013 - In Daniel De Simone & John Hessler (eds.), The Starry Messenger. Levenger Press. pp. 131-145.
    Galileo’s telescopic lunar observations, announced in Siderius Nuncius (1610), were a triumph of observational skill and ingenuity. Yet, unlike the Medicean stars, Galileo’s lunar “discoveries” were not especially novel. Indeed, Plutarch had noted the moon’s uneven surface in classical times, and many other renaissance observers had also turned their gaze moonward, even (in Harriot’s case) aided by telescopes of their own. Moreover, what Galileo and his contemporaries saw was colored by the assumptions they already had. Copernicans assumed the moon was (...)
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  • Writing and Sentiment: Blaise Pascal, the Vacuum, and the Pensées.Matthew L. Jones - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (1):139-181.
  • Knowledge Production in Non-European Spaces of Modernity: The Society of Jesus and the Circulation of Darwinian Ideas in Postcolonial Ecuador, 1860–1890.Ana Sevilla & Elisa Sevilla - 2015 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):233-250.
    This article is based on a perspective on circulation of knowledge that allows the consideration of science as the result of the encounter between diverse communities. We tell a story that constantly changes places, scales, and cultures in order to stress the importance of networks as an alternative to the centre/periphery trope, which entangles world histories of science. The result is a picture much more complex and intertwined than the one suggested by these simplifying dichotomies. We focus on a case (...)
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  • Robert Boyle and Mathematics: Reality, Representation, and Experimental Practice.Steven Shapin - 1988 - Science in Context 2 (1):23-58.
  • Knowledge and Salvation in Jesuit Culture.Rivka Feldhay - 1987 - Science in Context 1 (2):195-213.
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  • Light of Reason, Light of Nature. Catholic and Protestant Metaphors of Scientific Knowledge.William B. Ashworth - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (1):89-107.
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  • The Discourse of Pious Science.Rivka Feldhay & Michael Heyd - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (1):109-142.
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  • Transposing the Merton Thesis: Apostolic Spirituality and the Establishment of the Jesuit Scientific Tradition.Steven J. Harris - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (1):29-65.
  • From Aldrovandi to Algarotti: The Contours of Science in Early Modern Italy.Paula Findlen - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):353-360.
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  • The Crystallization of a New Narrative Form in Experimental Reports.Christian Licoppe - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (2):205-244.
  • Scientific Experiment and Legal Expertise: The Way of Experience in Seventeenth-Century England.Rose-Mary Sargent - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (1):19-45.
  • The Anthropology of Incommensurability.Mario Biagioli - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (2):183-209.
  • Pratique et preuve expérimentale en France au XVIIe siècle. L’émergence d’un modèle coopératif.Christian Licoppe - 1993 - Revue de Synthèse 114 (3-4):383-421.
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  • Experiment, Speculation, and Galileo's Scientific Reasoning.Gregory Dawes - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (3):343-360.
    Peter Anstey has suggested that in our analyses of early modern natural philosophy we should abandon a frequently used distinction: that between rationalism and empiricism. He argues that we should replace it with another distinction, that between experimental and speculative natural philosophy. The second distinction, he argues, was not only widely used at the time, but has a greater explanatory range. It follows, he suggests, that it is a better way of “carving up” the writings of that period.It is clear (...)
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  • Regressus and Empiricism in the Controversy About Galileo’s Lunar Observations.David Marshall Miller - 2018 - Perspectives on Science 26 (3):293-324.
    One of the distinctive features of modern science is a commitment to empiricism—a fundamental expectation that theoretical hypotheses will survive encounters with observations. Those that comport with the theory's explanations and predictions confirm the theory. Anomalous observations that do not fit theoretical expectations disconfirm it. Moreover, experiments can be contrived to generate observations that might serve to confirm or disconfirm a theory. Philosophers of science may disagree as to how exactly all of this is supposed to work, but the basic (...)
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  • Le trait d'union musical tiré par mersenne entre encyclopédie et rhétorique académique.Michel Dufour - 2001 - Revue de Synthèse 122 (2-4):577-641.
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  • Controlling the Experiment: Rhetoric, Court Patronage and the Experimental Method of Francesco Redi.Paula Findlen - 1993 - History of Science 31 (1):35-64.
  • The Social Status of Italian Mathematicians, 1450-1600.Mario Biagioli - 1989 - History of Science 27 (1):41-95.
  • Science and Instruments: The Telescope as a Scientific Instrument at the Beginning of the Seventeenth Century.Yaakov Zik - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (3):259-284.
    : Scientific observation is determined by the human sensory system, which generally relies on instruments that serve as mediators between the world and the senses. Instruments came in the shape of Heron's Dioptra, Levi Ben Gerson's Cross-staff, Egnatio Danti's Torqvetto Astronomico, Tycho's Quadrant, Galileo's Geometric Military Compass, or Kepler's Ecliptic Instrument. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, however, it was unclear how an instrument such as the telescope could be employed to acquire new information and expand knowledge about the (...)
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  • Genetic Epistemology, History of Science and Science Education.Creso Franco & Dominique Colinvaux-De-Dominguez - 1992 - Science & Education 1 (3):255-271.
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