Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Models, Scientific Realism, the Intelligibility of Nature, and Their Cultural Significance.Mohd Hazim Shah bin Abdul Murad - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):253-261.
    In this article, I will view realist and non-realist accounts of scientific models within the larger context of the cultural significance of scientific knowledge. I begin by looking at the historical context and origins of the problem of scientific realism, and claim that it is originally of cultural and not only philosophical, significance. The cultural significance of debates on the epistemological status of scientific models is then related to the question of ‘intelligibility’ and how science, through models, can give us (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Kind of History is the History of the Self? New Perspectives From the History of Mind and Brain Medicine.Nima Bassiri - 2019 - Modern Intellectual History 16 (2):653-665.
    In a recent forum contribution to the American Historical Review on the relationship between history and biology, Lynn Hunt proposed that the future of academic scholarship devoted to exploring the origins and development of modern selfhood would depend on the disciplinary alliance between history and neuroscience. Tabling, for the moment, the cogency of her central assertion, we can nevertheless agree that Hunt espouses a sentiment shared by many historians: “the question of the self is a huge and difficult subject on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Cementing Science. Understanding Science Through Its Development.Veli Virmajoki - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Turku
    In this book, I defend the present-centered approach in historiography of science (i.e. study of the history of science), build an account for causal explanations in historiography of science, and show the fruitfulness of the approach and account in when we attempt to understand science. -/- The present-centered approach defines historiography of science as a field that studies the developments that led to the present science. I argue that the choice of the targets of studies in historiography of science should (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rethinking Instrumentality: Natural Philosophy and Christian Charity in the Early Modern Atlantic World.Sarah Irving - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):55-76.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is Basic Research? Insights From Historical Semantics.Désirée Schauz - 2014 - Minerva 52 (3):273-328.
    For some years now, the concept of basic research has been under attack. Yet although the significance of the concept is in doubt, basic research continues to be used as an analytical category in science studies. But what exactly is basic research? What is the difference between basic and applied research? This article seeks to answer these questions by applying historical semantics. I argue that the concept of basic research did not arise out of the tradition of pure science. On (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • What’s in It for the Historian of Science? Reflections on the Value of Philosophy of Science for History of Science.Theodore Arabatzis - 2017 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 31 (1):69-82.
    In this article, I explore the value of philosophy of science for history of science. I start by introducing a distinction between two ways of integrating history and philosophy of science: historical philosophy of science and philosophical history of science. I then offer a critical discussion of Imre Lakatos’s project to bring philosophy of science to bear on historical interpretation. I point out certain flaws in Lakatos’s project, which I consider indicative of what went wrong with PHS in the past. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Claiming Ownership in the Technosciences: Patents, Priority and Productivity.Christine MacLeod & Gregory Radick - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):188-201.
  • Why New Hybrid Organizations Are Formed: Historical Perspectives on Epistemic and Academic Drift.Thomas Kaiserfeld - 2013 - Minerva 51 (2):171-194.
    By comparing three types of hybrid organizations—18th-century scientific academies, 19th-century institutions of higher vocational education, and 20th-century industrial research institutes—it is the purpose here to answer the question of why new hybrid organizations are continuously formed. Traditionally, and often implicitly, it is often assumed that emerging groups of potential knowledge users have their own organizational preferences and demands influencing the setup of new hybrid organizations. By applying the concepts epistemic and academic drift, it will be argued here, however, that internal (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation