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  1. Beauvoir and Bergson: A Question of Influence.Margaret A. Simons - 2012 - In Shannon M. Mussett & William S. Wilkerson (eds.), Beauvoir and Western Thought From Plato to Butler. pp. 153-170.
    Simone de Beauvoir’s early enthusiasm for the philosophy of Henri Bergson (1859-1941)—denied in her 1958 autobiography, Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter—is a surprising discovery in her 1927 handwritten student diary, as I reported in 1999 and explored at more length in 2003 (Simons 1999; Simons 2003). Discovered by Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir after Beauvoir’s death in 1986 and now housed in the Bibliothèque nationale, Beauvoir’s student diary first appeared in print in the 2006 volume, Diary of a Philosophy Student: (...)
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  • The Poetry of Habit: Beauvoir and Merleau-Ponty on Aging Embodiment.Helen A. Fielding - 2014 - In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir’s Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics. DeGruyter Publishers69-81. pp. 69-82.
    As people age their actions often become entrenched—we might say they are not open to the new; they are less able to adapt; they are stuck in a rut. Indeed, in The Coming of Age (La Vieillesse) Simone de Beauvoir writes that to be old is to be condemned neither to freedom nor to meaning, but rather to boredom (Beauvoir 1996, 461; 486). While in many ways a very pessimistic account of ageing, the text does provide promising moments where her (...)
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  • On Politics and Violence: Arendt Contra Fanon.Kimberly Hutchings Elizabeth Frazer - 2008 - Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):90.
  • Whither Authenticity?Ainsley J. Newson & Richard E. Ashcroft - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):53 – 55.
  • Dosing Dilemmas: Are You Rich and White or Poor and Black?Cynthia Griggins - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):55 – 57.
  • The Sense of Life – Jean-Luc Nancy and Emmanuel Lévinas.Nicole Paula Maria Note - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (4):347-361.
    ABSTRACTMetaphysics has long been regarded as providing meaning to the world. Subsequent progressive replacement attempts of this narrative by a scientific approach have generally led to a view of life as being void of meaning. However, this has not affected the quest for meaning or for an understanding of this meaning, despite an increasing societal neglect of the importance of its pursuit. This article aims to contribute to a philosophical understanding of the sense of life in the world, drawing on (...)
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  • Existence and the Communicatively Competent Self.Martin Beck Matus - 1999 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (3):93-120.
    Most readers of Habermas would not classify him as an existential thinker. The view of Habermas as a philosopher in German Idealist and Critical traditions from Kant to Hegel and Marx to the Frankfurt School prevails among Continental as much as among analytic philosophers. And the mainstream Anglo-American reception of his work and politics is shaped by the approaches of formal analysis rather than those of existential and social phenomenology or even current American pragmatism. One may argue that both these (...)
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  • From Existential Alterity to Ethical Reciprocity: Beauvoir’s Alternative to Levinas.Ellie Anderson - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review 52 (2):171-189.
    While Simone de Beauvoir’s theory of alterity has been the topic of much discussion within Beauvoir scholarship, feminist theory, and social and political philosophy, it has not commonly been a reference point for those working within ethics. However, Beauvoir develops a novel view that those concerned with the ethical import of respect for others should consider seriously, especially those working within the Levinasian tradition. I claim that Beauvoir distinguishes between two forms of otherness: namely, existential alterity and sociopolitical alterity. While (...)
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  • Motivation and the Primacy of Perception.Peter Antich - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Kentucky
    In this dissertation, I provide an interpretation and defense of Merleau-Ponty's thesis of the primacy of perception, namely, the thesis that all knowledge is founded in perceptual experience. I take as an interpretative and argumentative key Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological conception of motivation. Whereas epistemology has traditionally accepted a dichotomy between reason and natural causality, I show that this dichotomy is not exhaustive of the forms of epistemic grounding. There is a third type of grounding, the one characteristic of the grounding relations (...)
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  • Alterity in Simone de Beauvoir and Emmanuel Levinas: From Ambiguity to Ambivalence.Valerie Giovanini - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (1):39-58.
  • In Search of Lost Time, Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Time of Objects.Dorothea Olkowski - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):525-544.
    The chapter on temporality in Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception , is situated in a section titled, “Being-for-Itself and Being-in-the-World.” As such, Merleau-Ponty’s task in the chapter on temporality is to bring these two positions together, in other words, to articulate the manner in which time links the cogito (Being-for-Itself) with freedom (Being-in-the-World). To accomplish this, Merleau-Ponty proposes a subject located at the junction of the for-itself and the in-itself, a subject which has an exterior that makes it possible for others (...)
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  • Caring: Feminine Ethics or Maternalistic Misandry? A Hermeneutical Critique of Nel Noddings' Phenomenology of the Moral Subject and Education.Donald Vandenberg - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (2):253–269.
    After her curriculum proposal is presented, Noddings' feminine ethics is submitted to a critique through an interpretation of her three books. Her distortion of Gilligan and Chodorow is explained. Indebtedness to male sources is noted. The over-emphasis upon good and upon first-person experience is criticised and traced to feminist rage, which is interpreted as the result of the oppression of women. Noddings' suppressed 'Kantianism' is explicated to maintain the dialectic between so-called male and female voices. Main strengths of her curriculum (...)
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  • Articles.George W. Noblit, Richard A. Quantz, Kathleen Knight Abowitz, John Willinsky, Bernardo Gallegos & Burton Weltman - 2002 - Educational Studies 33 (1):6-83.
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  • Relationality and Life: Phenomenological Reflections on Miscarriage.J. Lenore Wright - 2018 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):135-156.
    Feminist philosophers familiar with the work of Helen Marshall will recall her wonderfully witty reflections on pregnancy in "Our Bodies, Ourselves: Why We Should Add Old-Fashioned Empirical Phenomenology to the New Theories of the Body."1 Her text is laden with amusing metaphors of the pregnant body—"a little teapot " —and rich analyses of the corporeal dimensions of pregnancy. Marshall maintains that the experience of pregnancy is not, as we might believe, a unified experience; rather, it is more like a self (...)
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  • Complicit Suffering and the Duty to Self-Care.Alycia W. LaGuardia-LoBianco - 2018 - Philosophy 93 (2):251-277.
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  • Kairós and Clinamen: Revolutionary Politics and the Common Good.Alessandra Asteriti - 2013 - Law and Critique 24 (3):277-294.
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  • The Existential Dimensions of Frederick Douglass’s Autobiographical Narrative.G. Yancy - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (3):297-320.
    Frederick Douglass’s socio-political narrative is explored through an existential lens, arguing that Douglass is contesting the proposition that essence precedes existence. Douglass, through his fight with Covey, a white ‘slave breaker’, and his escape to freedom, affirms his existence as being for it-self over and against the reduction of his existence to that of being in-itself. Drawing from the work of Simone de Beauvoir, who was greatly influenced by the phenomenological and politico-praxic work of Black novelist Richard Wright, it is (...)
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  • Skepticism and the Lure of Ambiguity.Lorraine Code - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):222-228.
  • Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest.Debra B. Bergoffen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    : This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  • The Sisyphean Torture of Housework: Simone de Beauvoir and Inequitable Divisions of Domestic Work in Marriage.Andrea Veltman - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):121-143.
    : This paper examines Simone de Beauvoir's account of marriage in The Second Sex and argues that Beauvoir's dichotomy between transcendence and immanence can provide an illuminating critique of continuing gender inequities in marriage and divisions of domestic work. Beauvoir's existentialist ethics not only establishes a moral wrong in marriages in which wives perform the second shift of household labor but also supports the need to transform existing normative expectations surrounding wives and domestic work.
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  • Desire, Death and Wonder: Reading Simone de Beauvoir's Narratives of Travel.Simone Fullagar - 2001 - Cultural Values 5 (3):289-305.
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  • The Look of Love.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):56-78.
    : I begin to suggest an alternative to the notion of vision based in alienation and hostility put forth by Jean-Paul Sartre, Sigmund Freud, and Jacques Lacan. I diagnose this alienating vision as a result of a particular alienating notion of space presupposed by their theories. I develop Irigaray's comments about light and air to suggest an alternative notion of space that opens up the possibility that vision connects us to others rather than alienates us from them.
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  • The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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