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  1. Brain, Mind, World: Predictive Coding, Neo-Kantianism, and Transcendental Idealism.Dan Zahavi - 2018 - Husserl Studies 34 (1):47-61.
    Recently, a number of neuroscientists and philosophers have taken the so-called predictive coding approach to support a form of radical neuro-representationalism, according to which the content of our conscious experiences is a neural construct, a brain-generated simulation. There is remarkable similarity between this account and ideas found in and developed by German neo-Kantians in the mid-nineteenth century. Some of the neo-Kantians eventually came to have doubts about the cogency and internal consistency of the representationalist framework they were operating within. In (...)
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  • Perception and Coincidence in Helmholtz’s Theory of Measurement.Matthias Neuber - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (3).
    The present paper is concerned with Helmholtz’s theory of measurement. It will be argued that an adequate understanding of this theory depends on how Helmholtz’s application of the concepts of perception and coincidence is interpreted. In contrast both to conventionalist and Kantian readings of Helmholtz’s theory, a more realistic interpretation will be suggested.
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  • Helmholtz and Philosophy: Science, Perception, and Metaphysics, with Variations on Some Fichtean Themes.Gary Hatfield - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (3).
    This article considers Helmholtz’s relation to philosophy, including Fichte’s philosophy. Recent interpreters find Fichtean influence on Helmholtz, especially concerning the role of voluntary movement in distinguishing subject from object, or “I” from “not-I.” After examining Helmholtz’s statements about Fichte, the article describes Fichte’s ego-doctrine and asks whether Helmholtz could accept it into his sensory psychology. He could not accept Fichte’s core position, that an intrinsically active I intellectually intuits its own activity and posits the not-I as limiting and determining that (...)
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  • “Physiological Kantianism” and the “Organization of the Mind”: A Reconsideration.Paolo Pecere - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review:1-22.
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