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Gilles Deleuze (1968). Différence Et Répétition.

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  1.  9
    Private Thinkers, Untimely Thoughts: Deleuze, Shestov and Fondane.Bruce Baugh - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (3):313-339.
    It has gone largely unnoticed that when Deleuze opposes the “private thinker” to the “public professor,” he is invoking the existential thought of Lev Shestov. The public professor defends established values and preaches submission to the demands of reason and the State; the private thinker opposes thought to reason, “idiocy” to common sense, a people to come to what exists. Private thinkers are solitary, singular and untimely, forced to think against consensus and “the crowd.” Deleuze takes from Shestov and Kierkegaard (...)
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  2.  6
    James Williams Gilles Deleuze'sDifference and Repetition:A Critical Introduction and Guide, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press and Henry Somers-Hall Deleuze's Difference and Repetition, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Andrew Jampol-Petzinger - 2015 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 9 (2):257-264.
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  3.  26
    Five Figures of Folding: Deleuze on Leibniz's Monadological Metaphysics.Mogens Lærke - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1192-1213.
    This article is about Gilles Deleuze's book Le Pli. Leibniz et le Baroque from 1988. It shows how Deleuze's notion of folding captures some basic intuitions in Leibniz and how they relate to each other. To this purpose, I propose five figures, all referring to the same basic fold, all illustrating how the consideration of such figures allows developing central elements of Leibniz's monadology. These figures can help, I hope, alleviate some of the fundamental difficulties in understanding Deleuze's approach to (...)
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  4.  7
    Violence.Katerina Kolozova - 2014 - Angelaki 19 (2):99-111.
    Revolutionary violence stems from the conatus of survival, from the appetite for life (Spinoza) and joy rather than from the desire to destroy and the hubristic pretension to punish (?i?ek and Benjamin). It is an incursion of one's desire to affirm life and annihilate pain. Following Laruelle's methodology of nonstandard philosophy, I conclude that revolutionary violence is the product of an intensive expansion of life. Pure violence, conceived in non-philosophical terms, is a pre-lingual, presubjective force affected by the ?lived,; analogous (...)
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  5.  6
    The Rise and Fall of the Simulacrum.Charles Mayell - 2014 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 8 (4):445-469.
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  6.  38
    Tyche, Clinamen, Den.Mladen Dolar - 2013 - Continental Philosophy Review 46 (2):223-239.
    The paper takes as the starting point a dense and notorious quote by Lacan where he takes up in a single gesture three concepts of ancient philosophy, tyche, clinamen and den. The contention is that all three aim at the status of the object, although by different means and in different philosophical contexts, and the paper tries to spell out some crucial points concerning each. Tyche, usually translated as chance and put into an opposition with automaton, requires a reading of (...)
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  7.  47
    Plato and Socrates: From an Educator of Childhood to a Childlike Educator?Walter Omar Kohan - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):313-325.
  8.  2
    El problema de la utopía en Gilles Deleuze.Marcelo Antonelli - 2012 - Isegoría 47:519-539.
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  9.  29
    Politics in the Middle: For a Political Interpretation of the Dualisms in Deleuze and Guattari.Rodrigo Nunes - 2010 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 4 (Suppl):104-126.
    The paper identifies three recent lines of interpretation of the politics that can be derived from Deleuze and Guattari, all of which share a way of reading the dualisms in their work that can be traced back to how they understand the actual/virtual partition, and to an alleged pre-eminence of the virtual over the actual. It is argued that this reading is not only inaccurate, but obscures the political dimension of Deleuze and Guattari's work. Clarifying the latter requires a reinterpretation (...)
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  10.  66
    Adding Deleuze to the Mix.John Protevi - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):417-436.
    In this article I will suggest ways in which adding the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze to the mix can complement and extend the 4EA approach to cognitive science. In the first part of the paper, I will show how the Deleuzean tripartite ontological difference (virtual/intensive/actual) can provide an explicit ontology for dynamical systems theory. The second part will take these ontological notions and apply them to three areas of concern to the 4EA approaches: (a) the Deleuzean concept of the virtual (...)
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  11.  67
    Peter Hallward: Out of This World: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Creation. [REVIEW]Erinn Cunniff Gilson - 2009 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):429-434.
    Review essay of Peter Hallward's Out of This World: Deleuze and the Philosophy of Creation.
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  12.  73
    If Not Here, Then Where? On the Location and Individuation of Events in Badiou and Deleuze.James Williams - 2009 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 3 (1):97-123.
    This paper sets out a series of critical contrasts between Alain Badiou and Gilles Deleuze's philosophies of the event. It does so in the context of some likely objections to their positions from a broadly analytic position. These objections concern problems of individuation and location in space-time. The paper also explains Deleuze and Badiou's views on the event through a literary application on a short story by John Cheever. In conclusion it is argued that both thinkers have good answers to (...)
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  13.  70
    Gilles Deleuze and Michel Henry: Critical Contrasts in the Deduction of Life as Transcendental.James Williams - 2008 - Sophia 47 (3):265-279.
    To address the theological turn in phenomenology, this paper sets out critical arguments opposing the theist phenomenology of Michel Henry and Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy of the event. Henry’s phenomenology has been overlooked in recent commentaries compared with, for example, Jean-Luc Marion’s work. It will be shown here that Henry’s philosophy presents a detailed novel turn in phenomenology structured according to critical moves against positions developed from Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. This demonstration is done through a strong contrast with Deleuze and (...)
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  14.  24
    The Determination of Sense Via Deleuze and Blanchot: Paradoxes of the Habitual, the Immemorial, and the Eternal Return.Eugene Brently Young - 2008 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 2 (2):155-177.
    Eternal return is the paradox that accounts for the interplay between difference and repetition, a dynamic at the heart of Deleuze's philosophy, and Blanchot's approach to this paradox, even and especially through what it elides, further illuminates it. Deleuze draws on Blanchot's characterisations of difference, forgetting, and the unlivable to depict the ‘sense’ produced via eternal return, which, for Blanchot, is where repetition implicates or ‘carries’ pure difference. However, for Deleuze, difference and the unlivable are also developed by the living (...)
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  15.  84
    The Vitality of Stupidity.René ten Bos - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (2):139 – 150.
    It is argued that the focus within organization studies on wisdom is one-sided in the sense that it ignores stupidity, wisdom's little stepbrother. Too often it is simply taken for granted that an increase in wisdom will lead to a decrease in stupidity. The problem with this assumption is that it is philosophically uninformed. Stupidity and wisdom stand in a deeply paradoxical relationship, which has been studied by philosophers at least since the Stoics. Some recent contributions to this endless debate (...)
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  16. The Memory of Another Past: Bergson, Deleuze and a New Theory of Time.Alia Al-Saji - 2004 - Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):203-239.
    Through the philosophies of Bergson and Deleuze, my paper explores a different theory of time. I reconstitute Deleuze’s paradoxes of the past in Difference and Repetition and Bergsonism to reveal a theory of time in which the relation between past and present is one of coexistence rather than succession. The theory of memory implied here is a non-representational one. To elaborate this theory, I ask: what is the role of the “virtual image” in Bergson’s Matter and Memory? Far from representing (...)
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  17. The End of Phenomenology: Bergson's Interval in Irigaray.Dorothea Olkowski - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):73-91.
    : Luce Irigaray is often cited as the principle feminist who adheres to phenomenology as a method of descriptive philosophy. A different approach to Irigaray might well open the way to not only an avoidance of phenomenology's sexist tendencies, but the recognition that the breach between Irigaray's ideas and those of phenomenology is complete. I argue that this occurs and that Irigaray's work directly implicates a Bergsonian critique of the limits of phenomenology.
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  18. The End of Phenomenology: Bergson's Interval in Irigaray.Dorothea E. Olkowski - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):73-91.
    Luce Irigaray is often cited as the principle feminist who adheres to phenomenology as a method of descriptive philosophy. A different approach to Irigaray might well open the way to not only an avoidance of phenomenology's sexist tendencies, but the recognition that the breach between Irigaray's ideas and those of phenomenology is complete. I argue that this occurs and that Irigaray's work directly implicates a Bergsonian critique of the limits of phenomenology.
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  19. Time, Baroque Codes and Canonization1.Boaventura de Sousa Santos - 1998 - Cultural Values 2 (2-3):403-420.
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  20.  21
    ?November 4, 1995: Deleuze's Death as an Event? [REVIEW]Andr� Pierre Colombat - 1996 - Man and World 29 (3):235-249.
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  21.  18
    The Subject in Feminism.Rosi Braidotti - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (2):155 - 172.
    Inaugural lecture as Professor of Women's Studies in the Arts Faculty of the University of Utrecht, May 16, 1990.
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  22.  26
    Oedipus Rex: The Oedipus Rule and its Subversion.Alphonso Lingis - 1984 - Human Studies 7 (1-4):91-100.
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