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  1. Information Processing as an Account of Concrete Digital Computation.Nir Fresco - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology 26 (1):31-60.
    It is common in cognitive science to equate computation (and in particular digital computation) with information processing. Yet, it is hard to find a comprehensive explicit account of concrete digital computation in information processing terms. An information processing account seems like a natural candidate to explain digital computation. But when ‘information’ comes under scrutiny, this account becomes a less obvious candidate. Four interpretations of information are examined here as the basis for an information processing account of digital computation, namely Shannon (...)
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  • In Defense of the Unprovability of the Church-Turing Thesis.Selmer Bringsjord - unknown
    One of us has previously argued that the Church-Turing Thesis (CTT), contra Elliot Mendelson, is not provable, and is — light of the mind’s capacity for effortless hypercomputation — moreover false (e.g., [13]). But a new, more serious challenge has appeared on the scene: an attempt by Smith [28] to prove CTT. His case is a clever “squeezing argument” that makes crucial use of Kolmogorov-Uspenskii (KU) machines. The plan for the present paper is as follows. After covering some necessary preliminaries (...)
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  • Foundational Analyses of Computation.Yuri Gurevich - 2012 - In S. Barry Cooper (ed.), How the World Computes. pp. 264--275.
  • Explication as a Three-Step Procedure: The Case of the Church-Turing Thesis.Matteo De Benedetto - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (1):1-28.
    In recent years two different axiomatic characterizations of the intuitive concept of effective calculability have been proposed, one by Sieg and the other by Dershowitz and Gurevich. Analyzing them from the perspective of Carnapian explication, I argue that these two characterizations explicate the intuitive notion of effective calculability in two different ways. I will trace back these two ways to Turing’s and Kolmogorov’s informal analyses of the intuitive notion of calculability and to their respective outputs: the notion of computorability and (...)
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  • A Note on the Relation Between Formal and Informal Proof.Jörgen Sjögren - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (4):447-458.
    Using Carnap’s concept explication, we propose a theory of concept formation in mathematics. This theory is then applied to the problem of how to understand the relation between the concepts formal proof and informal, mathematical proof.
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  • What Is Nature-Like Computation? A Behavioural Approach and a Notion of Programmability.Hector Zenil - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology (3):1-23.
    The aim of this paper is to propose an alternative behavioural definition of computation (and of a computer) based simply on whether a system is capable of reacting to the environment—the input—as reflected in a measure of programmability. This definition is intended to have relevance beyond the realm of digital computers, particularly vis-à-vis natural systems. This will be done by using an extension of a phase transition coefficient previously defined in an attempt to characterise the dynamical behaviour of cellular automata (...)
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  • Should Computability Be Epistemic? A Logical and Physical Point of View.Florent Franchette - 2016 - Philosophies 1 (1):15--27.
    Although the formalizations of computability provided in the 1930s have proven to be equivalent, two different accounts of computability may be distinguished regarding computability as an epistemic concept. While computability, according to the epistemic account, should be based on epistemic constraints related to the capacities of human computers, the non-epistemic account considers computability as based on manipulations of symbols that require no human capacities other than the capacity of manipulating symbols according to a set of rules. In this paper, I (...)
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  • Insights in How Computer Science Can Be a Science.Robert W. P. Luk - 2020 - Science and Philosophy 8 (2):17-46.
    Recently, information retrieval is shown to be a science by mapping information retrieval scientific study to scientific study abstracted from physics. The exercise was rather tedious and lengthy. Instead of dealing with the nitty gritty, this paper looks at the insights into how computer science can be made into a science by using that methodology. That is by mapping computer science scientific study to the scientific study abstracted from physics. To show the mapping between computer science and physics, we need (...)
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  • Towards an Evaluation of the Normalisation Thesis on Identity of Proofs: The Case of Church-Turing Thesis as Touchstone.Tiago de Castro Alves - 2020 - Manuscrito 43 (3):114-163.
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  • What Is Nature-Like Computation? A Behavioural Approach and a Notion of Programmability.Hector Zenil - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (3):399-421.
    The aim of this paper is to propose an alternative behavioural definition of computation based simply on whether a system is capable of reacting to the environment—the input—as reflected in a measure of programmability. This definition is intended to have relevance beyond the realm of digital computers, particularly vis-à-vis natural systems. This will be done by using an extension of a phase transition coefficient previously defined in an attempt to characterise the dynamical behaviour of cellular automata and other systems. The (...)
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  • Semantical Mutation, Algorithms and Programs.Porto André - 2015 - Dissertatio (S1):44-76.
    This article offers an explanation of perhaps Wittgenstein’s strangest and least intuitive thesis – the semantical mutation thesis – according to which one can never answer a mathematical conjecture because the new proof alters the very meanings of the terms involved in the original question. Instead of basing our justification on the distinction between mere calculation and proofs of isolated propositions, characteristic of Wittgenstein’s intermediary period, we generalize it to include conjectures involving effective procedures as well.
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  • Is There Any Real Substance to the Claims for a 'New Computationalism'?Alberto Hernandez-Espinosa, Hernandez-Quiroz Francisco & Zenil Hector - forthcoming - In CiE Computability in Europe 2017. Springer Verlag.
    'Computationalism' is a relatively vague term used to describe attempts to apply Turing's model of computation to phenomena outside its original purview: in modelling the human mind, in physics, mathematics, etc. Early versions of computationalism faced strong objections from many (and varied) quarters, from philosophers to practitioners of the aforementioned disciplines. Here we will not address the fundamental question of whether computational models are appropriate for describing some or all of the wide range of processes that they have been applied (...)
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  • On the Parallel Computation Thesis.Nachum Dershowitz & Evgenia Falkovich-Derzhavetz - 2016 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 24 (3):346-374.
  • Copeland and Proudfoot on Computability.Michael Rescorla - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):199-202.
    Many philosophers contend that Turing’s work provides a conceptual analysis of numerical computability. In (Rescorla, 2007), I dissented. I argued that the problem of deviant notations stymies existing attempts at conceptual analysis. Copeland and Proudfoot respond to my critique. I argue that their putative solution does not succeed. We are still awaiting a genuine conceptual analysis.
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  • Turing Machines.David Barker-Plummer - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.