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Given Time: I: Counterfeit Money

University of Chicago Press (1992)

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  1. Exploring ‘Gift’ Theories for New Immigrants' Literacy Education in Taiwan.Ho‐Chia Chueh - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1110-1120.
    This paper addresses ‘the gift’ as the central concept in a discussion about the literacy education for new immigrants that has been developing in Taiwan since the early 1990s. The point of departure for this discussion is the advent of international marriages that are the consequence of new arrivals from Southeast Asia and China, and their effect guest/host relationship. In the first half of the article, I apply Marcel Mauss' idea of gift in order to examine the interactions within this (...)
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  • What Is the Model of Trust for Multi-Agent Systems? Whether or Not E-Trust Applies to Autonomous Agents.Massimo Durante - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):347-366.
    A socio-cognitive approach to trust can help us envisage a notion of networked trust for multi-agent systems based on different interacting agents. In this framework, the issue is to evaluate whether or not a socio-cognitive analysis of trust can apply to the interactions between human and autonomous agents. Two main arguments support two alternative hypothesis; one suggests that only reliance applies to artificial agents, because predictability of agents’ digital interaction is viewed as an absolute value and human relation is judged (...)
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  • Returning (to) the Gift of Death: Violence and History in Derrida and Levinas.Jeffrey Hanson - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (1):1 - 15.
    The purpose of this paper is to establish a proper context for reading Jacques Derrida's The Gift of Death, which, I contend, can only be understood fully against the backdrop of "Violence and Metaphysics." The later work cannot be fully understood unless the reader appreciates the fact that Derrida returns to "a certain Abraham" not only in the name of Kierkegaard but also in the name of Levinas himself. The hypothesis of the reading that follows therefore would be that Derrida (...)
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  • Receiving the Gift of Teaching: From 'Learning From' to 'Being Taught By'.Gert Biesta - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (5):449-461.
    This paper is an enquiry into the meaning of teaching. I argue that as a result of the influence of constructivist ideas about learning on education, teaching has become increasingly understood as the facilitation of learning rather than as a process where teachers have something to give to their students. The idea that teaching is immanent to learning goes back to the Socratic idea of teaching as a maieutic process, that is, as bringing out what is already there. Against the (...)
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  • Deconstruction and Creation: An Augustinian Deconstruction of Derrida.Mark Cauchi - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (1):15-32.
    In recent continental philosophy of religion there has been significant attention paid to the Abrahamic doctrines of creation ex nihilo and divine omnipotence, especially by deconstructive thinkers such as Derrida, Caputo, and Keller. For these thinkers, the doctrine represents a form of agency that does violence to various forms of alterity. While broadly supportive of their fundamental philosophical and ethico-political views, especially about the primordiality of alterity, I differ from them in that I argue that creation ex nihilo articulates the (...)
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  • Strange Frequencies – Reading Hamlet with Derrida and Nancy.Chiara Alfano - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (2):214-231.
    This essay sounds out Derrida's plurivocal term of frequencies as well as Nancy's understanding of resonance to argue that ghosts live in the ear. Heeding how the different nuances of this term bear on Derrida's reading of Hamlet, it not only seeks to understand the significance of the ghost's rhythmic appearance:disappearance in Shakespeare's play, but indeed, how it comes to frequent Derrida's Specters of Marx.
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  • Taking Turns: Democracy to Come and Intergenerational Justice.Matthias Fritsch - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (2):148-172.
    In the face of the ever-growing effect the actions of the present may have upon future people, most conspicuously around climate change, democracy has been accused, with good justification, of a presentist bias: of systemically favouring the presently living. By contrast, this paper will argue that the intimate relation, both quasi-ontological and normative, that Derrida's work establishes between temporality and justice insists upon another, more future-regarding aspect of democracy. We can get at this aspect by arguing for two consequences of (...)
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  • (Dis)Figures of Death: Taking the Side of Derrida, Taking the Side of Death.Saitya Brata Das - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (1):1-20.
    If the dominant ethico-philosophical thinking of responsibility in the West is founded upon, or tied to a certain figure of death, it is because this ethical notion of responsibility is also a certain econo-onto-thanatology. Here the notion of the gift to the other is always already inscribed within a certain economic equivalence of value, or an economic determination of temporality as the geometric figure of the circle, or a certain economy of the experiences of abandonment and mourning, through which the (...)
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  • The Rediscovery of Teaching: On Robot Vacuum Cleaners, Non-Egological Education and the Limits of the Hermeneutical World View.Gert Biesta - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (4):374-392.
    In this article, I seek to reclaim a place for teaching in face of the contemporary critique of so-called traditional teaching. While I agree with this critique to the extent to which it is levelled at an authoritarian conception of teaching as control, a conception in which the student can only exist as an object of the interventions of the teacher and never as a subject in its own right, I argue that the popular alternative to traditional teaching, that is (...)
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  • Has the Guest Arrived Yet? Emmanuel Levinas, a Stranger in Business Ethics.Eleni Karamali - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):313-321.
    To what extent can business ethics be ‘hospitable’ to Levinasian ethics? This paper raises questions about how business ethics relates to its guests, in this case the guest called ‘Levinas’; the idea of introducing or inviting the work of an author into a field, as its guest, is by no means a simple problem of transference. For Jacques Derrida, there is hospitality only when the stranger's introduction to our home is totally unconditional. Such a conceptualisation of hospitality becomes even more (...)
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  • Iris Marion Young's Imaginations of Gift Giving: Some Implications for the Teacher and the Student.Simone Galea - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (1):83-92.
    The paper discusses Iris Marion Young's idea of asymmetric reciprocity that rethinks typical understandings of gift giving. Iris Marion Young's proposals for asymmetric ethical relationships have important implications for democratic contexts that seek to take differences seriously. Imagining oneself in the place of the other or expecting from the other what one expects from oneself levels out differences between people and hinders possibilities of interaction. The conditions of asymmetry and reciprocity of Iris Marion Young's communicative ethics, as well as that (...)
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  • Confronting the Anthropocene: Schelling and Lucretius on Receiving Nature's Gift.Christopher Lauer - 2016 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 8 (2):160-179.
    This essay interprets Schelling's positive philosophy as an effort to conceive nature as a gift. Schelling ruminated throughout his career on the paradoxical relation between humanity and nature that is expressed in the contemporary term “Anthropocene,” but this essay argues that Schelling's most productive response to this paradox can be found in his reflections on how to receive the gift of nature. After laying out the project of positive philosophy, the essay first explores Schelling's effort to conceive nature as a (...)
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  • Form as an Organization of Time.Martin Seel - 2007 - Critical Horizons 8 (2):157-168.
    This paper argues that time, not space, is the highlight of aesthetic and especially artistic form. Spatial relations must be translated into temporal relations and experienced as such if they are to be experienced as aesthetic form. The reverse is not the case, for aesthetic and artistic forms are not generally there to create spaces, at least not in a literal sense, but to give time in a very literal sense. The meaning of form is time.
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  • (Un)Expected Suffering: The Corporeal Specificity of Vulnerability.Jessica Robyn Cadwallader - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):105-125.
    Judith Butler's (2006) account of vulnerability, resonant with other accounts offered by feminist theorists of embodiment (such as Margrit Shildrick [2000] and Rosalyn Diprose [2002]), underscores a "conception of the human . . . in which we are, from the start, given over to the other, one in which we are, from the start, even prior to individuation itself and, by virtue of bodily requirements, given over to some set of primary others" (31). She is concerned with how this state (...)
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  • Derrida’s The Purveyor of Truth and Constitutional Reading.Jacques de Ville - 2008 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):117-137.
    In this article the author explores Jacques Derrida’s reading in The Purveyor of Truth of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Purloined Letter. In his essay, Derrida proposes a reading which differs markedly from the interpretation proposed by Lacan in his Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter’. To appreciate Derrida’s reading, which is not hermeneutic-semantic in nature like that of Lacan, it is necessary to look at the relation of Derrida’s essay to his other texts on psychoanalysis, more specifically insofar as the Freudian (...)
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  • The Tragic, the Impossible and Democracy: An Interview with Jacques Derrida. [REVIEW]Danie Goosen - 2010 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (3):243-264.
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  • Dying for a Smoke: Freudian Addiction and the Joy of Consumption.Scott Wilson - 2002 - Angelaki 7 (2):161 – 173.
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  • The Membrane and the Diaphragm: Derrida and Esposito on Immunity, Community, and Birth.Penelope Deutscher - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (3):49-68.
    This paper considers two among the several points of intersection in the work of Roberto Esposito and Jacques Derrida. First, and most obviously: in the context of conceptualizing community, and more broadly, Esposito and Derrida have elaborated concepts of immunity and auto-immunity to refer to auto-destructive modes of defense which profoundly threaten what – seemingly – ought to have been safeguarded through their mechanism. The second point of proximity is the use both make of figures of maternity and birth in (...)
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  • Economy of "Invisible Debt" and Ethics of "Radical Hospitality": Toward a Paradigm Change of Hospitality From "Gift" to "Forgiveness".Ilsup Ahn - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (2):243-267.
    The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct a Christian theology of “hospitality” through a critical reading of Jacques Derrida and Friedrich Nietzsche as well as through an in-depth biblical and theological reflection on the ethics of hospitality. Out of this reconstructive investigation, I propose a new Christian ethics of hospitality as a radical kind. As a new paradigm, this radical hospitality is distinguished from other types in that it is no longer conceived on the model of “gift”. The new (...)
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  • Economy Suspended: The Possibilities of a Badiouian Business Ethics.Robert B. Couch & Joseph M. Spencer - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (4):404-416.
    In the philosophy of Alain Badiou, ethics can only arise in relation to an evental truth procedure that breaks from the economic logic of a situation. Further, because for Badiou there cannot be economic truths per se – rather, economic matters must be understood in their relation to one or more truths in the domain of love, art, science or politics – a Badiouian business ethics would look entirely distinct from any ethics that simply places limits on certain kinds of (...)
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  • Nietzsche on Generosity and the Gift-Giving Virtue.Richard White - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):348-364.
    Generosity and gift-giving are important themes in Nietzsche's philosophy. This essay focuses on Nietzsche's idea of the gift-giving virtue which is explicitly discussed at the end of Part One of Thus Spoke Zarathustra. I begin with a critical discussion of this section, and then I consider three different interpretations. Finally, I look at some ways in which the idea of the ‘gift-giving virtue’ may be understood in terms of spiritual generosity, leading to ‘sovereignty’ as its ultimate goal. Throughout, there are (...)
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  • Auto-Immunity of Trust Without Trust.Badredine Arfi - 2010 - Journal of International Political Theory 6 (2):188-216.
    Trust has been widely investigated both theoretically and empirically. Whether thought of as the result of a calculation of costs/benefits, a shared identity, or a leap of faith, there always seems to be an ‘as if’ rhetorical gesture which is ultimately needed to explain how actors move from the base of trust to expectations of trust via suspending judgment on uncertainty and fear of vulnerability to betrayal and exploitation – the actors ultimately act ‘as if’ they do not fear uncertainty (...)
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  • Goodness Beyond Speech.Alex Segal - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (3):201–221.
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  • Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Marguerite la Caze - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  • The Nature of the Gift: Accountability and the Professor‐Student Relationship.Ana M. Martínez‐Alemán - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):574–591.
    In this paper I introduce the theory of gift giving as a possible means to reconcile the contradictions inherent in accountability measures of ‘faculty productivity’ in the American university. In this paper I sketch the theory of gift economies to show how, given the historical ideals that characterize the faculty‐student relationship, a theory of gift giving could help us better judge the labor of the faculty. I suggest that it is the relational character of teaching that frustrates accountability measures and (...)
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  • Has the Guest Arrived Yet? Emmanuel Levinas, a Stranger in Business Ethics.Eleni Karamali - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (3):313–321.
    To what extent can business ethics be hospitable to Levinasian ethics? This paper raises questions about how business ethics relates to its guests, in this case the guest called Levinas; the idea of introducing or inviting the work of an author into a field, as its guest, is by no means a simple problem of transference. For Jacques Derrida, there is hospitality only when the stranger's introduction to our home is totally unconditional. Such a conceptualization of hospitality becomes even more (...)
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  • Kierkegaard and Recent Continental Philosophy of Religion.Michael Tilley - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (4):400-408.
    The place and significance of religious community is a central concern in recent continental philosophy of religion. Although Kierkegaard is a significant influence for many recent continental philosophers of religion, recent work on his social thought is largely ignored. I begin the paper by describing how recent continental philosophers of religion, in particular John Caputo, John Milbank, and Jürgen Habermas, have used Kierkegaard in order to address social questions. Then I show how recent work on Kierkegaard’s social thought – namely, (...)
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  • Eckhart, Derrida, and The Gift of Love.David Newheiser - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (6):1010-1021.
    This paper argues that Jacques Derrida and Meister Eckhart both construe love as a gift that is entirely free of economic exchange, and both conclude on this basis that love cannot be grasped or identified. In my reading, Eckhart and Derrida do not rule out consideration of one’s own well-being, but their accounts do entail that calculated self-protection is external to love. For this reason, they suggest, lovers should not expect to balance love against a prudential restraint: although both demands (...)
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  • The End(s) of Philosophy: Rhetoric, Therapy and Wittgenstein's Pyrrhonism.Bob Plant - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (3):222–257.
  • The Confessing Animal in Foucault and Wittgenstein.Bob Plant - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):533-559.
    In "The History of Sexuality", Foucault maintains that "Western man has become a confessing animal" (1990, 59), thus implying that "man" was not always such a creature. On a related point, Wittgenstein suggests that "man is a ceremonial animal" (1996, 67); here the suggestion is that human beings are, by their very nature, ritualistically inclined. In this paper I examine this crucial difference in emphasis, first by reconstructing Foucault's "genealogy" of confession, and subsequently by exploring relevant facets of Wittgenstein's later (...)
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  • Returning the Gift of Death: Violence and History in Derrida and Levinas.Jeffrey Hanson - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (1):1-15.
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  • The Gift in Therapy.Erik Abrams - 2006 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association 2 (2):111-117.
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  • Absolute Goodness, Wonder and the Evildoer.Alex Segal - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (4):312-327.
    Raimond Gaita affirms absolute goodness as the only thing with the power to keep fully among us the worst kind of evildoer. At issue in this goodness is a wonder that he ties to joy. Yet Gaita does not, perhaps cannot, imagine this power with respect to the evildoer concretely enough for it to move us in the way his account requires. An aspect of his writings that resists the emphasis on a joyous wonder may assist our thinking about the (...)
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