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  1. Queer Politics in Schools: A Rancièrean Reading.Claudia W. Ruitenberg - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5-6):618-634.
    The perceptibility and intelligibility of queer students and teachers have been a central theme in queer politics in education. Can queer teachers be ‘out’ to their colleagues and students? Can queer relationships be seen at the school prom? Can queerness be seen and heard? At the same time, perceptibility and intelligibility are by no means uncontested political goals. This paper analyzes different school initiatives by and/or for queer students and asks how political these initiatives are from the perspective of Jacques (...)
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  • Addressing the Dead of Friendship, Community, and the Work of Mourning.Roger Starling - 2002 - Angelaki 7 (2):107 – 124.
  • Derrida and Comparative Philosophy.Steven Burik - 2014 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (2):125-142.
    This article argues that Derrida’s thinking is relevant to comparative philosophy. To illustrate this, at various stages classical Daoism is compared with Derrida’s thought, to highlight Derrida’s “applicability” and to see how using Derrida can contribute to new interpretations of Daoism. The article first looks into Derrida’s engagement with non-Western thought, and then proceeds to his extensive work regarding language and translation, comparing this with views on classical Chinese language and translation of key Daoist characters. It then explores Derrida’s efforts (...)
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  • The Universal Right to Education: Freedom, Equality and Fraternity.Ylva Bergström - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (2):167-182.
    The overall aim of the article is to analyse how the universal right to education have been built, legitimized and used. And more specifically ask who is addressed by the universal right to education, and who is given access to rights and to education. The first part of the article focus on the history of declarations, the notion of the universal right to education, emphasizing differences in matters of detail—for example, the meaning of ‘compulsory’, ‘children’s rights’ or ‘parents’ rights’—and critically (...)
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  • The European 'We': From Citizenship Policy to the Role of Education.Maria Olson - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):77-89.
    This article sheds light on the European Union’s policy on citizenship; on the collective dimension of this policy, its ‘we’. It is argued that the inclusive, identity-constituting forces prominent in EU policy on European citizenship serve as a basis for the exclusion of people, which is illustrated by the recent expulsion of Romani from France. Based on a reading of Derrida, the twofold aim of this article is to reformulate the concept of a European citizenship ‘we’ and secondly, to outline (...)
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  • Derrida’s The Purveyor of Truth and Constitutional Reading.Jacques de Ville - 2008 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):117-137.
    In this article the author explores Jacques Derrida’s reading in The Purveyor of Truth of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Purloined Letter. In his essay, Derrida proposes a reading which differs markedly from the interpretation proposed by Lacan in his Seminar on ‘The Purloined Letter’. To appreciate Derrida’s reading, which is not hermeneutic-semantic in nature like that of Lacan, it is necessary to look at the relation of Derrida’s essay to his other texts on psychoanalysis, more specifically insofar as the Freudian (...)
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  • Merleau-Pontian Phenomenology as Non-Conventionally Utopian.Greg Johnson - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (3):383-400.
    This essay takes up the claim made recently by Simon Critchley in The Companion to Continental Philosophy that a feature common to many philosophers in the Continental tradition is the utopian demand that things be otherwise. The general question I pursue has to do with whether or not such a claim includes movements within Continental philosophy that do not self-identify with the utopian (like critical theory). The particular question has to do with whether or not the movement of phenomenology is (...)
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  • Deconstruction and Creation: An Augustinian Deconstruction of Derrida.Mark Cauchi - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (1):15-32.
    In recent continental philosophy of religion there has been significant attention paid to the Abrahamic doctrines of creation ex nihilo and divine omnipotence, especially by deconstructive thinkers such as Derrida, Caputo, and Keller. For these thinkers, the doctrine represents a form of agency that does violence to various forms of alterity. While broadly supportive of their fundamental philosophical and ethico-political views, especially about the primordiality of alterity, I differ from them in that I argue that creation ex nihilo articulates the (...)
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  • The Word Became Machine: Derrida's Technology of Incarnation.Steven Shakespeare - 2013 - Derrida Today 6 (1):36-57.
    For Derrida, the technological, automatic and mechanical could never simply be defined as external or opposed to the voluntary, conscious and spiritual. The articulation and repeatability of the trace means that there is something machinic that is inseparable from the possibilities of meaning, choice and faith. This paper will draw on various texts – including ‘Faith and Knowledge’, Without Alibi and On Touching – to explore the mutual unravelling of machine and flesh in the Christian doctrine of the incarnation. It (...)
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  • Taking Turns: Democracy to Come and Intergenerational Justice.Matthias Fritsch - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (2):148-172.
    In the face of the ever-growing effect the actions of the present may have upon future people, most conspicuously around climate change, democracy has been accused, with good justification, of a presentist bias: of systemically favouring the presently living. By contrast, this paper will argue that the intimate relation, both quasi-ontological and normative, that Derrida's work establishes between temporality and justice insists upon another, more future-regarding aspect of democracy. We can get at this aspect by arguing for two consequences of (...)
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  • Citizenship and the Ambivalence of Birth.Samir Haddad - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (2):173-193.
    In this paper I examine the meaning of birth in the work of Agamben, Esposito, and Derrida, paying particular attention to how it operates in their analyses of citizenship and national belonging. I show that Agamben views birth as negative, Esposito proposes a positive conception, and Derrida's writings imply an understanding that is ambivalent. Then, by focusing on the phenomenon of multiple citizenship, I argue for the value of the Derridean view.
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  • Derrida and the Future(s) of Phenomenology.Neal de Roo - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (1):107-131.
    This paper seeks to examine the significance of Derrida's work for an understanding of the basic tenets of phenomenology. Specifically, via an analysis of his understanding of the subject's relation to the future, we will see that Derrida enhances the phenomenological understanding of temporality and intentionality, thereby moving the project of phenomenology forward in a unique way. This, in turn, suggests that future phenomenological research will have to account for an essential (rather than merely a secondary) role for both linguistic (...)
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  • Derridean Deconstruction and the Question of Nature.Makoto Katsumori - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (1):56-74.
    This article inquires into a paradoxical position held by the concept of ‘nature’ in Derrida's thought. While a pivotal part of his project of deconstruction is devoted to a critique of the metaphysical privileging of nature over its others (technics, culture, and so on), the same project also aims at dismantling the hierarchical binary opposition of man/animal. Insofar as the term ‘animal’ or ‘animality’ to a large extent overlaps with nature, these two strands of his thought appear to stand in (...)
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  • Derrida: Opposing Death Penalties.Marguerite La Caze - 2009 - Derrida Today 2 (2):186-199.
    Derrida's purpose in ‘Death Penalties’ (2004), is to show how both arguments in favour of capital punishment, exemplified by Kant's, and arguments for its abolition, such as those of Beccaria, are deconstructible. He claims that ‘never, to my knowledge, has any philosopher as a philosopher, in his or her own strictly and systematically philosophical discourse, never has any philosophy as such contested the legitimacy of the death penalty.’ (2004, 146) Derrida also asks how it is possible ‘to abolish the death (...)
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  • The Teaching of Philosophy: Renewed Rights and Responsibilities.Denise Egéa‐Kuehne - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (3):271–284.
  • Auto-Immunity of Trust Without Trust.Badredine Arfi - 2010 - Journal of International Political Theory 6 (2):188-216.
    Trust has been widely investigated both theoretically and empirically. Whether thought of as the result of a calculation of costs/benefits, a shared identity, or a leap of faith, there always seems to be an ‘as if’ rhetorical gesture which is ultimately needed to explain how actors move from the base of trust to expectations of trust via suspending judgment on uncertainty and fear of vulnerability to betrayal and exploitation – the actors ultimately act ‘as if’ they do not fear uncertainty (...)
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  • The Turbulence of Derrida's Event.C. J. Davies - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):125-133.
    Angelaki, Volume 18, Issue 4, Page 125-133, December 2013.
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  • Don't Fence Me In: The Liberation of Undomesticated Critique.Claudia Ruitenberg - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):341–350.
  • Derrida, Politics and Democracy to Come.Paul Patton - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (6):766-780.
  • Supplementing Claire Colebrook: A Response to “Creative Evolution and the Creation of Man”.Nicole Anderson - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):133-146.
    In her paper “Creative Evolution and the Creation of Man,” one of the arguments Colebrook puts forth is that as a means of challenging the mechanistic and teleological conception of Darwinian evolution, creative evolution takes an antihumanist position by positing that there is an absence of end, thus “man” is able to create his own end. But in taking this position, Colebrook points out that creative evolution re-establishes the humanistic discourse on the human that it was attempting to challenge. To (...)
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