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  1. War as a Workplace: Ethical Implications of the Occupational Shift.Ned Dobos - 2019 - Journal of Military Ethics 18 (3):248-260.
    ABSTRACTSoldiering has traditionally been thought of as something radically different from a job or career, but things are changing. Sociologists have observed an “occupational shift” in military s...
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  • Beyond Antidoping and Harm Minimisation: A Stakeholder-Corporate Social Responsibility Approach to Drug Control for Sport.Jason Mazanov - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):220-223.
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  • Contractarian Business Ethics: Current Status and Next Steps.Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas Donaldson - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):173-186.
    Social contract is rapidly becoming one of the significant alternatives for analyzing ethical issues in business. Contractarian approachesemphasizing consent as a means of justifying principles can provide needed context for rendering normative judgements conceming economic behaviors. Current research issues include developing tests of consent for both hypothetical and extant social contracts, and empirically testing the assumptions of the major contractarian approaches. Open questions include exploring the relationship between contractarian business ethics and other approaches, such as stakeholder management and virtue based (...)
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  • Should We Let Employees Contract Away Their Rights Against Arbitrary Discharge?Michael J. Phillips - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (4):233 - 242.
    This article argues that the moral right to be discharged only for good cause and like rights can be contracted away by employees in appropriate circumstances. It maintains that the rights in question are not inalienable, and that there is nothing irrational about an employee''s wishing to deal them away. It also maintains that inequalities in bargaining power between employers and employees are insufficiently pervasive to justify a flat ban on the alienation of these rights. For a waiver of such (...)
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  • Beyond Coercion: Moral Assessment in the Labour Market.Dan Munter & Lars Lindblom - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (1):59-70.
    Some libertarians argue that informed consent alone makes transactions in the labour market morally justified. In contrast, some of their critics claim that such an act of consent is no guarantee against coercion. To know whether agreements are voluntary, we need to assess the quality of the offers or the prevailing background conditions. ISCT theorists argue that it is imperative to take social norms into account when evaluating the labour market. We present a novel framework for moral assessment in the (...)
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  • Occupational Safety and Paternalism: Machan Revisited.Earl W. Spurgin - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):155-173.
    In 1987, Machan provided a libertarian case against the right to occupational safety. Since before Machan’s essay appeared, many business ethicists and legal scholars have given considerable attention to the overall position Machan endorses: the acceptance of employment at will and the rejection of employee rights. No one yet has given adequate attention, however, to the fact that Machan’s argument against the right to occupational safety actually stands or falls independently of his overall position on employee rights. His argument ultimately (...)
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