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A Discourse on Method

Tuttle (1912)

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  1. Husbandry to Industry: Animal Agriculture, Ethics and Public Policy.Jes Harfeld - 2010 - Between the Species 13 (10):9.
    The industrialisation of agriculture has led to considerable alterations at both the technological and economical levels of animal farming. Several animal welfare issues of modern animal agriculture – e.g. stress and stereotypical behaviour – can be traced back to the industrialised intensification of housing and numbers of animals in production. Although these welfare issues dictate ethical criticism, it is the claim of this article that such direct welfare issues are only the forefront of a greater systemic ethical problem inherent to (...)
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  • An Anarchy of Man : Cartesian and Post-Cartesian Representations of the Self in Selected Western Literature.Joel Spencer - unknown
    This Master of Arts thesis is in two parts: a novel, An Anarchy of Man, and an exegesis which places the novel in relation to philosophical concerns about the self and the way those concerns are portrayed in selected works of Western literature. The novel is set in Canberra and Sydney and tells the story of the relationship between two characters: Joe and Gin. It explores the way we in the modern Western world think about ourselves and those around us. (...)
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  • Seeing and Caring: The Role of Affect in Feminist Moral Epistemology.Margaret Olivia Little - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (3):117 - 137.
    I develop two different epistemic roles for emotion and desire. Caring for moral ends and people plays a pivotal though contingent role in ensuring reliable awareness of morally salient details; possession of various emotions and motives is a necessary condition for autonomous understanding of moral concepts themselves. Those who believe such connections compromise the "objective" status of morality tend to assume rather than argue for the bifurcated conception of reason and affect this essay challenges.
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  • The Medieval Origins of Conceivability Arguments.Stephen Boulter - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (5):617-641.
    The central recommendation of this article is that philosophers trained in the analytic tradition ought to add the sensibilities and skills of the historian to their methodological toolkit. The value of an historical approach to strictly philosophical matters is illustrated by a case study focussing on the medieval origin of conceivability arguments and contemporary views of modality. It is shown that common metaphilosophical views about the nature of the philosophical enterprise as well as certain inference patterns found in thinkers from (...)
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  • Descartes' Influence on Turing.Darren Abramson - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):544-551.
  • To 'the Possibility of Computers Becoming Persons' (1989).Adam Drozdek - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (2):177 – 197.
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  • Experience and Education: Introduction to the Special Issue. [REVIEW]Jan Bengtsson - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):1-5.
  • Deleuzian Concepts for Education: The Subject Undone.Elizabeth Adams StPierre - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (3):283-296.
  • Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness.Abraham Akkerman - 2006 - Human Studies 29 (2):229-256.
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded the built (...)
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  • Open-Mindedness in Moral Education: Three Contemporary Approaches.William Hare - 1987 - Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):99-107.
    Three fashionable approaches to moral education are examined to see how far they satisfy the ideal of open-mindedness. It seems clear that (1) values clarification, (2) situation ethics and (3) critical issues all seek to avoid indoctrination, and, in different ways, present an alternative to traditional moral instruction with its emphasis on absolute moral rules. In stressing the autonomy of the individual, in denouncing prefabricated rules, and in promoting discussion of vexed questions, a clear concern for open-mindedness can be detected. (...)
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