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Meditations on First Philosophy

Caravan Books (1993)

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  1. The Role of Skeptical Evidence in the First and Second “Meditations”. Article 1. The Doubt according to Descartes and Sextus Empiricus.Oleg Khoma - 2016 - Sententiae 35 (2):6-22.
    The first article of the cycle “The role of skeptical evidence in the First and Second ‘Meditations’” compares the Cartesian and Sextus Empiricus’ concepts of doubt in, respectively, “Metaphysical meditations” and “Outlines of Pyrrhonism”. The article starts with the current state of the problem “Descartes and skepticism” and admits the existence of consensus about Cartesian perception of skeptical tradition: Cartesius (1) was influenced by all skeptical movements, known in his time, and (2) created a generalized notion that contains elements of (...)
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  • The Heterogeneity of the Imagination.Amy Kind - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (1):141-159.
    Imagination has been assigned an important explanatory role in a multitude of philosophical contexts. This paper examines four such contexts: mindreading, pretense, our engagement with fiction, and modal epistemology. Close attention to each of these contexts suggests that the mental activity of imagining is considerably more heterogeneous than previously realized. In short, no single mental activity can do all the explanatory work that has been assigned to imagining.
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  • Concepts, Experience and Modal Knowledge1.C. S. Jenkins - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):255-279.
    forthcoming in R. Cameron, B. Hale and A. Hoffmann (ed.s), The Logic, Epistemology and Metaphysics of Modality, Oxford University Press. Presents a concept-grounding account of modal knowledge.
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  • Virtually Transcendent: Cyberculture and the Body.David J. Gunkel - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (2):111 – 123.
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  • Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Structural Realism but Were Afraid to Ask.Roman Frigg & Ioannis Votsis - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):227-276.
    Everything you always wanted to know about structural realism but were afraid to ask Content Type Journal Article Pages 227-276 DOI 10.1007/s13194-011-0025-7 Authors Roman Frigg, Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London, WC2A 2AE UK Ioannis Votsis, Philosophisches Institut, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Universitätsstraße 1, Geb. 23.21/04.86, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany Journal European Journal for Philosophy of Science Online ISSN 1879-4920 Print ISSN 1879-4912 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 2.
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  • Philosophical and Religious Origins of the Private Inner Self.Phillip Cary - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):121-134.
    Abstract. The modern concept of the inner self containing a private inner world has ancient philosophical and religious roots. These begin with Plato's intelligible world of ideas. In Plotinus, the intelligible world becomes the inner world of the divine Mind and its ideas, which the soul sees by turning “into the inside.” Augustine made the inner world into something merely human, not a world of divine ideas, so that the soul seeking for God must turn in, then up: entering into (...)
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  • Improving Non-Observational Experiences: Channelling and Ordering.Gerard De Zeeuw - 2011 - Journal of Research Practice 7 (2):Article M2.
    That the present day society profits from research in many areas is evident. This has stimulated a keen desire to emulate similarly advantageous contributions in other areas. It appears to imply not only a need to know how to (better) support action in general or any action, but also how to support the act of making "better" itself (better businesses, better houses, better emotions, better objectives, etc.). Developing the latter type of knowledge has proved to pose a major challenge, however. (...)
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  • Consciousness From a First-Person Perspective.Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):702-726.
    This paper replies to the first 36 commentaries on my target article on “Is human information processing conscious?” (Behavioral and Brain Sciences,1991, pp.651-669). The target article focused largely on experimental studies of how consciousness relates to human information processing, tracing their relation from input through to output, while discussion of the implications of the findings both for cognitive psychology and philosophy of mind was relatively brief. The commentaries reversed this emphasis, and so, correspondingly, did the reply. The sequence of topics (...)
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  • Consciousness: Limited but Consequential.Timothy D. Wilson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):701-701.
  • No Conscious or Co-Conscious?Graham F. Wagstaff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):700-700.
  • Consciousness May Still Have a Processing Role to Play.Robert Van Gulick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):699-700.
  • Attention is Necessary for Word Integration.Geoffrey Underwood - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):698-698.
  • Damn! There Goes That Ghost Again!Keith E. Stanovich - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):696-698.
  • Dissociating Consciousness From Cognition.David Spiegel - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):695-696.
  • Developing Concepts of Consciousness.Aaron Sloman - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):694-695.
  • A Lawful First-Person Psychology Involving a Causal Consciousness: A Psychoanalytic Solution.Howard Shevrin - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):693-694.
  • Isn't the First-Person Perspective a Bad Third-Person Perspective?W. Schaeken & G. D'Ydewalle - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-693.
  • A Limitation of the Reflex-Arc Approach to Consciousness.J. Steven Reznick & Philip David Zelazo - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-692.
  • Reasons for Doubting the Existence of Even Epiphenomenal Consciousness.Georges Rey - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):691-692.
  • Epi-Arguments for Epiphenomenalism.Bruce Mangan - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):689-690.
  • The Processing of Information is Not Conscious, but its Products Often Are.George Mandler - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):688-689.
  • Consciousness is King of the Neuronal Processors.William A. MacKay - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):687-688.
  • Consciousness: Only Introspective Hindsight?Dan Lloyd - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):686-687.
  • Conscious Functions and Brain Processes.Benjamin Libet - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):685-686.
  • Understanding Awareness at the Neuronal Level.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):683-685.
  • Is Consciousness Information Processing?Raymond Klein - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):683-683.
  • Velmans's Overfocused Perspective on Consciousness.Marcel Kinsbourne - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):682-683.
  • Consciousness, Analogy and Creativity.Mark T. Keane - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):682-682.
  • Limits of Preconscious Processing.Albrecht Werner Inhoff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):680-681.
  • Epiphenomenalism and the Reduction of Experience.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):680-680.
  • Has Consciousness a Sharp Edge?Robert A. M. Gregson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):679-680.
  • What is the Relation Between Language and Consciousness?Jeffrey A. Gray - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):679-679.
  • Memory with and Without Recollective Experience.John M. Gardiner - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):678-679.
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  • Dream Processing.David Foulkes - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):678-678.
  • Observing Protocol.Judith Economos - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):677-677.
  • Conscious Acts and Their Objects.Fred Dretske - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):676-677.
  • Hydrocephalus and “Misapplied Competence”: Awkward Evidence for or Against?N. F. Dixon - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):675-676.
  • On the Premature Demise of Causal Functions for Consciousness in Human Information Processing.Dale Dagenbach - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):675-675.
  • Consciousness and Making Choices.Raymond S. Corteen - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):674-674.
  • Consciousness and Content in Learning: Missing or Misconceived?Richard A. Carlson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):673-674.
  • Conscious Influences in Everyday Life and Cognitive Research.Kenneth S. Bowers - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):672-673.
  • Evidence Against Epiphenomenalism.Ned Block - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):670-672.
  • A Curious Coincidence? Consciousness as an Object of Scientific Scrutiny Fits Our Personal Experience Remarkably Well.Bernard J. Baars - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):669-670.
  • Is Human Information Processing Conscious?Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):651-69.
    Investigations of the function of consciousness in human information processing have focused mainly on two questions: (1) where does consciousness enter into the information processing sequence and (2) how does conscious processing differ from preconscious and unconscious processing. Input analysis is thought to be initially "preconscious," "pre-attentive," fast, involuntary, and automatic. This is followed by "conscious," "focal-attentive" analysis which is relatively slow, voluntary, and flexible. It is thought that simple, familiar stimuli can be identified preconsciously, but conscious processing is needed (...)
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  • Kant and the Ground of Dignity: The Centrality of the Fact of Reason.William Britton - unknown
    Kant famously claims that autonomy is the ground of dignity. If he is correct about the grounding relationship, then doubts about our autonomy entail doubts about our dignity. Here, I attempt to show that Kant is sensitive to this problem, and invokes the ‘fact of reason’ as the key piece of evidence for our autonomy, and therefore our dignity. But as is well known, Kant’s appeal to the Faktum is controversial. After presenting an exegetical case for the connection between dignity (...)
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  • Enactive Appraisal.Giovanna Colombetti - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):527-546.
    Emotion theorists tend to separate “arousal” and other bodily events such as “actions” from the evaluative component of emotion known as “appraisal.” This separation, I argue, implies phenomenologically implausible accounts of emotion elicitation and personhood. As an alternative, I attempt a reconceptualization of the notion of appraisal within the so-called “enactive approach.” I argue that appraisal is constituted by arousal and action, and I show how this view relates to an embodied and affective notion of personhood.
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  • The Point of Assertion is to Transmit Knowledge.John Turri - 2016 - Analysis 76 (2):130-136.
    Recent work in philosophy and cognitive science shows that knowledge is the norm of our social practice of assertion, in the sense that an assertion should express knowledge. But why should an assertion express knowledge? I hypothesize that an assertion should express knowledge because the point of assertion is to transmit knowledge. I present evidence supporting this hypothesis.
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  • A Defense of the Knowledge Argument.John Martin DePoe - unknown
    Defenders of the Knowledge Argument contend that physicalism is false because knowing all the physical truths is not sufficient to know all the truths about the world. In particular, proponents of the Knowledge Argument claim that physicalism is false because the truths about the character of conscious experience are not knowable from the complete set of physical truths. This dissertation is a defense of the Knowledge Argument. Chapter one characterizes what physicalism is and provides support for the claim that if (...)
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  • The Phenomenology of Movement: Action, Proprioception, and Embodied Knowledge.Wendy S. Scholz - unknown
    The intent of this thesis is to provide an account of the phenomenology of movement that collapses the distinction between mental and physical without the elimination of the mental. There are two main ways in which mental and physical converge in this account. First of all, the type of knowledge involved in learning movement skills is a type of nonpropositional knowledge that is literally embodied in the neuromuscular system of the body. Thus the mental phenomena of knowing-how and thinking how (...)
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