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  1. Reason, Nature, and God in Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 1989 - Science in Context 3 (1):175-201.
    This journal article has been superseded by a revised version, published in the collection _Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Rene Descartes_, ed. by Stephen Voss (Oxford University Press, 1993), 259–287.
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  • Wittgenstein and the Problem of Consciousness.Oswald Hanfling - 2003 - Think 1 (3):99-106.
    You have a rich inner life of conscious experiences. For example, you have pains and other sensations. And you have sensory experiences, such as that produced by chewing on something bitter. Scientists are currently puzzling over how to explain this inner life in scientific terms. Can we, for example, consciousness by appealing to certain facts about our brains?
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  • Descartes, Natural Philosopher.Margaret J. Osler - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):509-518.
  • The Absolutist Theory of Omnipotence.Nick Trakakis - 1997 - Sophia 36 (2):55-78.
  • Hume and The Self: A Critical Response.Alan Schwerin - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):15-30.
    In the discussion of personal identity, from his Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume reaches a famous, if notorious conclusion: there is no self. We are “nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions” (T 252). My argument is that Hume's thesis on the self rests on a questionable rejection of a rival view that appears to commit the fallacy of equivocation. Along the way I identify a few possible problems with Hume's overall analysis of the self. My argument (...)
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  • Reason, Nature, and God in Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 1993 - In Stephen Voss (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy and Science of Rene Descartes. Oxford University Press. pp. 259–287.
    Recent Cartesian scholarship postulates two Descartes, separating Descartes into a scientist and a metaphysician. The purpose varies, but one has been to show that the metaphysical Descartes, of the Meditations, is less genuine than the scientific Descartes. Accordingly, discussion of God and the soul, the evil demon, and the non-deceiving God were elements of rhetorical strategy to please theologians, not of serious philosophical argumentation. I agree in finding two Descartes, but the two I identify are not scientist and philosopher, but (...)
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  • Thomas Versus Thomas: A New Approach to Nagel's Bat Argument.Yujin Nagasawa - 2003 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):377-395.
    i l l ustrat es t he di ffi cul t y of providing a purely physical characterisation of phenomenal experi ence wi t ha vi vi d exampl e about a bat ’ s sensory apparatus. Whi l e a number of obj ect i ons have al ready been made to Nagel.
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  • He Thinks He Knows: And More Developmental Evidence Against the Simulation (Role Taking) Theory.Josef Perner & Deborrah Howes - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):72-86.
  • Structure and the Interpretation of Classical Modern Metaphysics.M. Glouberman - 1987 - Metaphilosophy 18 (3-4):270-287.
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  • Frankfurt and Descartes: God and Logical Truth. [REVIEW]David E. Schrader - 1986 - Sophia 25 (1):4-18.
  • Descartes's Changing Mind.Peter K. Machamer - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first book to focus on Descartes's changing views, and it is welcome."--Roger Ariew, University of South Florida.
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  • Physical Literacy: Philosophical Considerations in Relation to Developing a Sense of Self, Universality and Propositional Knowledge.Margaret Whitehead - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):281 – 298.
    This paper opens with a presentation of the philosophical underpinning and rationale of the concept of physical literacy. This is followed by an articulation of the concept of physical literacy. Three subsequent sections then consider aspects of the concept in a little more detail. The first investigates the relationship of the physical literacy to the development of a sense of self and to establishing interaction with others. Here the philosophical approach is informed by writings on cognitive development and recent neurological (...)
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