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The Philosophical Works of Descartes

Dover Publications (1911)

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  1. Kant and Russell on Leibniz’ Existential Assertions.Alessandro Rossi - 2021 - Sophia 60 (2):389-409.
    Leibniz believed in a God that has the power to create beings and whose existence could be a priori demonstrated. Kant objected that similar demonstrations all presuppose the false claim that existence is a real property. Russell added that if existence were a real property Leibniz should have concluded that God does not actually have the power to create anything at all. First, I show that Leibniz’ conception of existence is incompatible with the one that Russell presupposes. Subsequently, I argue (...)
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  • Of Levinas’ ‘Structure’ in Address to His Four ‘Others’.Dino Galetti - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (4):509-532.
    It has long been accepted that one of Levinas’ major concerns is to establish an ethics of responsibility for the ‘other.’ Yet it has been deemed for decades, even by Levinasians, that his approach to that concern is ‘unsystematic’ and ‘not consistent.’ That situation arose because Levinas’ four terms for ‘other’ are difficult to translate, so his terms were first addressed by adopting English conventions. Such conventions have furthered Levinas scholarship, but our aim is to consider Levinas’ consistency: Hence we (...)
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  • Before One Takes Empirical or Transcendental Positions.Robert C. Scharff - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-9.
    Trish Glazebrook and Dana Belu both think I spend too much time criticizing the Cartesianism that both empirical and transcendental philosophies of technology quite obviously oppose. They argue that I would have been better off if I had instead considered how these two philosophies “converge on the thesis of crisis” in technoscientific life and/or “made wider use of Feenberg’s work”. While I am sympathetic to both Glazebrook’s thesis and Feenberg’s work, I argue that their recommendations raise precisely the “pre-philosophical” issue (...)
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  • Can Abstractions Be Causes?David M. Johnson - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (1):63-77.
    The Empiricist or Lockean view says natural kinds do not exist objectively in nature but are practical categories reflecting use of words. The Modern, Ostensive view says they do exist, and one can refer to such a kind by ostention and recursion, assuming his designation of it is related causally to the kind itself. However, this leads to a problem: Kinds are abstract repeatables, and it seems impossible that abstractions could have causal force. In defence of the Modern view, I (...)
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  • On the Dimensionality of Surfaces, Solids, and Spaces.Ernest W. Adams - 1986 - Erkenntnis 24 (2):137 - 201.
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  • Given the Web, What is Intelligence, Really?Selmer Bringsjord & Naveen Sundar Govindarajulu - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (4):464-479.
    This article argues that existing systems on the Web cannot approach human-level intelligence, as envisioned by Descartes, without being able to achieve genuine problem solving on unseen problems. The article argues that this entails committing to a strong intensional logic. In addition to revising extant arguments in favor of intensional systems, it presents a novel mathematical argument to show why extensional systems can never hope to capture the inherent complexity of natural language. The argument makes its case by focusing on (...)
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  • On Weak Postpositivism: Ahistorical Rejections of the View From Nowhere.Robert C. Scharff - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (4):509-534.
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  • Why is the History of Philosophy Worth Our Study?Ryan Nichols - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (1):34-52.
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  • The Intentional and Social Nature of Human Emotions: Reconsideration of the Distinction Between Basic and Non‐Basic Emotions.Aaron Ben-ze'ev & Keith Oatley - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (1):81-94.
  • The Light Bulb and the Turing-Tested Machine.Justin Leiber - 1992 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (1):25–39.
  • An Analysis of Psychophysiological Symbolism and its Influence on Theories of Emotion.James R. Auerill - 1974 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 4 (2):147–190.
  • The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2020 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Foreword, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
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  • Anatomy, Metaphysics, and Values: The Ape Brain Debate Reconsidered. [REVIEW]Christopher Cosans - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):129-165.
    Conventional wisdom teaches that Thomas Huxley discredited Richard Owen in their debate over ape and human brains. This paper reexamines the dispute and uses it as a test case for evaluating the metaphysical realist, internal realist, and social constructivist theories of scientific knowledge. Since Owen worked in the Kantian tradition, his anatomical research illustrates the implications of internal realism for scientific practice. As an avowed Cartesian, Huxley offered a well developed attack on Owen''s position from a metaphysical realist perspective. Adrian (...)
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  • Doxastic Voluntarism and Forced Belief.Murray Clarke - 1986 - Philosophical Studies 50 (1):39 - 51.
  • Neurobiology and the Homunculus Thesis.Paul Tibbetts - 1995 - Man and World 28 (4):401-413.
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  • Instantiation as Partial Identity: Replies to Critics. [REVIEW]Donald L. M. Baxter - 2013 - Axiomathes 23 (2):291-299.
    One of the advantages of my account in the essay “Instantiation as Partial Identity” was capturing the contingency of instantiation—something David Armstrong gave up in his experiment with a similar view. What made the contingency possible for me was my own non-standard account of identity, complete with the apparatus of counts and aspects. The need remains to lift some obscurity from the account in order to display its virtues to greater advantage. To that end, I propose to respond to those (...)
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  • Love and Death—and Other Somatic Transactions.Vincent Colapietro - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):163-172.
    This paper both elaborates and interrogates the transactional model of human experience at the center of Shannon W. Sullivan's Living Across and Through Skins. In particular, it highlights the need to supplement her account with a psychoanalytic reading of our gendered subjectivities. Moreover, it stresses the necessity to focus on such humanly important—and irreducibly somatic—phenomena as grief and eros.
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  • Should Environmentalists Be Organicists?Bryan G. Norton - 1993 - Topoi 12 (1):21-30.
  • Pragmatism, Neopragmatism, and Phenomenology: The Richard Rorty Phenomenon. [REVIEW]Bruce Wilshire - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (1):95-108.
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  • Digital Dinosaurs and Artificial Life: Exploring the Culture of Nature in Computer and Video Games.John Wills - 2002 - Cultural Values 6 (4):395-417.
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  • On the Error of Treating Functions as Objects.Karen Green - 2016 - Analysis and Metaphysics 15:20–35.
    In his late fragment, ‘Sources of Knowledge of Mathematics and Natural Sciences’ Frege laments the tendency to confuse functions with objects and says, ‘It is here that the tendency of language by its use of the definite article to stamp as an object what is a function and hence a non-object, proves itself to be the source of inaccurate and misleading expressions and also of errors of thought. Probably most of the impurities that contaminate the logical source of knowledge have (...)
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  • Klein on the Unity of Cartesian and Contemporary Skepticism.Erik J. Olsson - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):511–524.
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  • The Problem of Mind-Body Interaction and the Causal Principle of Descartes’s Third Meditation.Dmytro Sepetyi - 2021 - Sententiae 40 (1):28-43.
    The article analyses recent English publications in Cartesian studies that deal with two problems: the problem of the intrinsic coherence of Descartes’s doctrine of the real distinction and interaction between mind and body and the problem of the consistency of this doctrine with the causal principle formulated in the Third Meditation. The principle at issue is alternatively interpreted by different Cartesian scholars either as the Hierarchy Principle, that the cause should be at least as perfect as its effects, or the (...)
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  • Treatise of Man: French Text with Translation and Commentary, Trans. Thomas Steele Hall.René Descartes - 1972 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    A translation by Thomas Steele Hall, an historian of physiology, of the 1664 edition of Descartes' L'Homme (ed. Claude Clerselier). Includes an introduction, review of Descartes' physiology, a synopsis of the first French edition, bibliographical materials (editions and sources of L'Homme), and extensive interpretive notes. Also incorporates the French text of 1664 of L'Homme. Forward by I. B. Cohen.
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  • Melanchthon’s Rhetoric and the Practical Origins of Reformation Human Science.Daniel M. Gross - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (3):5-22.
    At the beginning of the 16th century in Germany, religious ends and human art joined forces to produce a sacred rhetoric: a rhetoric that could transform human nature, and explain at the same time how such transformation was possible according to both science and scripture. No longer was it enough to ask in Scholastic fashion ‘What is man?’ - his essence and unique faculties, his special place in God’s world. A new question took on urgency in the wake of religious (...)
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  • Epistemology and the Cartesian Circle.Robert Cummins - 1975 - Theoria 41 (3):112-124.
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  • American Bioethics and Human Rights: The End of All Our Exploring.George J. Annas - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):658-663.
    In his compelling novel Blindness, José Saramago tells us about victims stricken by a contagious form of blindness who were quarantined and came to see themselves as pigs, dogs, and “lame crabs.” Of course, they were all human beings - although unable to perceive themselves, or others, as members of the human community. The disciplines of bioethics, health law, and human rights are likewise all members of the broad human rights community, although at times none of them may be able (...)
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  • American Bioethics and Human Rights: The End of All Our Exploring.George J. Annas - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):658-663.
    In his compelling novel Blindness, José Saramago tells us about victims stricken by a contagious form of blindness who were quarantined and came to see themselves as pigs, dogs, and “lame crabs.” Of course, they were all human beings - although unable to perceive themselves, or others, as members of the human community. The disciplines of bioethics, health law, and human rights are likewise all members of the broad human rights community, although at times none of them may be able (...)
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  • The Feeling Brain — The Thinking Soul.Silvia Gáliková - 2010 - Human Affairs 20 (3).
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  • Intentionality.David M. Rosenthal - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):151-184.
    At the level of our platitudinous background knowledge about things, speech is the expression of thought. And understanding what such expressing involves is central to understanding the relation between thinking and speaking. Part of what it is for a speech act to express a mental state is that the speech act accurately captures the mental state and can convey to others what mental state it is. And for this to occur, the speech act at least must have propositional content that (...)
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  • Self-Consciousness in Cognitive Systems.Ansgar Beckermann - 2003 - Schriftenreihe-Wittgenstein Gesellschaft 31:174-188.
    Dualism, but he seems at least to have acknowledged the possibility that Descartes might be right on this issue, i.e., that the real self is a _res cogitans_. Maybe this is why talk of.
     
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  • On the Individuation of Events.Carol Cleland - 1991 - Synthese 86 (2):229 - 254.
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  • Love and Death—and Other Somatic Transactions.Vincent Colapietro - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):163-172.
    : This paper both elaborates and interrogates the transactional model of human experience at the center of Shannon W. Sullivan's Living Across and Through Skins. In particular, it highlights the need (especially given her concerns and commitments) to supplement her account with a psychoanalytic reading of our gendered subjectivities. Moreover, it stresses the necessity to focus on such humanly important—and irreducibly somatic—phenomena as grief and eros.
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  • Logical Empiricism, Feminism, and Neurath's Auxiliary Motive.Kathleen Okruhlik - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):48-72.
    Much feminist philosophy of science has been developed as a reaction against logical empiricism and the associated view that social factors play no role in good science. Recent accounts of the Vienna Circle that highlighted the ways in which some of its members attempted to combine their empiricism with emancipatory politics are used here as a basis on which to reassess the relationship between logical empiricism and feminism. The focus is chiefly on Otto Neurath.
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  • Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God.Michael Della Rocca - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper goes (...)
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  • The Fetus as a Patient and the Ethics of Human Subjects Research: Response to Commentaries on “An Ethically Justified Framework for Clinical Investigation to Benefit Pregnant and Fetal Patients”.Laurence B. McCullough & Frank A. Chervenak - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):W3-W7.
    Research to improve the health of pregnant and fetal patients presents ethical challenges to clinical investigators, institutional review boards, funding agencies, and data safety and monitoring boards. The Common Rule sets out requirements that such research must satisfy but no ethical framework to guide their application. We provide such an ethical framework, based on the ethical concept of the fetus as a patient. We offer criteria for innovation and for Phase I and II and then for Phase III clinical trials (...)
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  • Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):156-173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  • Neuroethology of Releasing Mechanisms: Prey-Catching in Toads.Jörg-Peter Ewert - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):337-368.
    “Sign stimuli” elicit specific patterns of behavior when an organism's motivation is appropriate. In the toad, visually released prey-catching involves orienting toward the prey, approaching, fixating, and snapping. For these action patterns to be selected and released, the prey must be recognized and localized in space. Toads discriminate prey from nonprey by certain spatiotemporal stimulus features. The stimulus-response relations are mediated by innate releasing mechanisms with recognition properties partly modifiable by experience. Striato-pretecto-tectal connectivity determines the RM's recognition and localization properties, (...)
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  • “The Mind Is Its Own Place”: Science and Solitude in Seventeenth-Century England.Steven Shapin - 1991 - Science in Context 4 (1):191-218.
    The ArgumentIt is not easy to point to the place of knowledge in our culture. More precisely, it is difficult to locate the production of our most valued forms of knowledge, including those of religion, literature and science. A pervasive topos in Western culture, from the Greeks onward, stipulates that the most authentic intellectual agents are the most solitary. The place of knowledge is nowhere in particular and anywhere at all. I sketch some uses of the theme of the solitary (...)
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  • Helen Keller as Cognitive Scientist.Justin Leiber - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):419 – 440.
    Nature's experiments in isolation—the wild boy of Aveyron, Genie, their name is hardly legion—are by their nature illusive. Helen Keller, blind and deaf from her 18th month and isolated from language until well into her sixth year, presents a unique case in that every stage in her development was carefully recorded and she herself, graduate of Radcliffe College and author of 14 books, gave several careful and insightful accounts of her linguistic development and her cognitive and sensory situation. Perhaps because (...)
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  • The Enlightenment: Conscience and Authority in Judgment. [REVIEW]Wenyu Xie - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):264-281.
    There were two prevailing sentiments in Europe after the Reformation: One opposing papal authority and one advocating individual freedom. This paper analyzes these two sentiments and finds that the concept of conscience is crucial in understanding them. The issue of conscience is about judging truth and good, and in initiating the Reformation, Martin Luther heavily appealed to his conscience while countering Catholic attacks. With the wide dispersal of the Reformation, Luther’s notion of conscience was well received among his supporters throughout (...)
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  • مطالعه تطبیقی آثار انسان شناختی سوبژکتیویسم و وجود تعلقی صدرایی.سیمین اسفندیاری - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 19 (71):67-80.
    با تأمل در فلسفۀ ملاصدرا می‌توان دریافت که انسان موجودی است دارای استعدادهای نامحدود که با به فعلیت رسیدن در این عالم معنا پیدا می‌کند و چون به عنوان موجودی محدود تعلق وجودی به وجود لایتناهی دارد، تلاش می‌کند وجود خود را تحقق و معنا بخشد. لذا باتوجه به وجود تعلقی انسان و نقش عالم در معنا بخشی به وجود او، می‌توان به نسبت انسان با عالم و حرکت به سوی حق‌تعالی که غایت همۀ حرکت های اوست، پی برد. اما (...)
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  • How Neurons Mean: A Neurocomputational Theory of Representational Content.Chris Eliasmith - 2000 - Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis
    Questions concerning the nature of representation and what representations are about have been a staple of Western philosophy since Aristotle. Recently, these same questions have begun to concern neuroscientists, who have developed new techniques and theories for understanding how the locus of neurobiological representation, the brain, operates. My dissertation draws on philosophy and neuroscience to develop a novel theory of representational content.
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  • Believing at Will is Possible.Rik Peels - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):1-18.
    There are convincing counter-examples to the widely accepted thesis that we cannot believe at will. For it seems possible that the truth of a proposition depend on whether or not one believes it. I call such scenarios cases of Truth Depends on Belief and I argue that they meet the main criteria for believing at will that we find in the literature. I reply to five objections that one might level against the thesis that TDB cases show that believing at (...)
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  • Existential Import in Cartesian Semantics.John N. Martin - 2011 - History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (3):211-239.
    The paper explores the existential import of universal affirmative in Descartes, Arnauld and Malebranche. Descartes holds, inconsistently, that eternal truths are true even if the subject term is empty but that a proposition with a false idea as subject is false. Malebranche extends Descartes? truth-conditions for eternal truths, which lack existential import, to all knowledge, allowing only for non-propositional knowledge of contingent existence. Malebranche's rather implausible Neoplatonic semantics is detailed as consisting of three key semantic relations: illumination by which God's (...)
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  • The World as Representation: Schopenhauer's Arguments for Transcendental Idealism.Douglas James McDermid - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):57 – 87.
  • Lesbian Slip.Tangren Alexander - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (4):14-30.
    We were relaxing after supper, my daughter, who was ten, and my ninety-six-year-old grandmother, and I. Marcella had long known that I was a lesbian, and in her simple child's way understood perfectly. Grandma was another matter; I would have to wait for her to die before I could be open in the family about who I was. She could never be told. I loved her; there seemed no reason to distress her, who kept herself so deliberately innocent about the (...)
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  • Anne Viscountess Conway: A Seventeenth Century Rationalist.Jane Duran - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):64 - 79.
    The work of Spinoza, Descartes and Leibniz is cited in an attempt to develop, both expositorily and critically, the philosophy of Anne Viscountess Conway. Broadly, it is contended that Conway's metaphysics, epistemology and account of the passions not only bear intriguing comparison with the work of the other well-known rationalists, but supersede them in some ways, particularly insofar as the notions of substance and ontological hierarchy are concerned. Citing the commentary of Loptson and Carolyn Merchant, and alluding to other commentary (...)
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  • Self-Knowledge: Rationalism Vs. Empiricism.Aaron Z. Zimmerman - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (2):325–352.
    Recent philosophical discussions of self-knowledge have focused on basic cases: our knowledge of our own thoughts, beliefs, sensations, experiences, preferences, and intentions. Empiricists argue that we acquire this sort of self-knowledge through inner perception; rationalists assign basic self-knowledge an even more secure source in reason and conceptual understanding. I try to split the difference. Although our knowledge of our own beliefs and thoughts is conceptually insured, our knowledge of our experiences is relevantly like our perceptual knowledge of the external world.
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  • Reality and the Coloured Points in Hume's Treatise.Marina Frasca‐Spada - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (1):25 – 46.