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  1. Ethical challenges experienced by UK military medical personnel deployed to Sierra Leone during the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak: a qualitative study. [REVIEW]Heather Draper & Simon Jenkins - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):77.
    As part of its response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa, the United Kingdom government established an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, staffed by military personnel. Little is known about the ethical challenges experienced by military medical staff on humanitarian deployment. We designed a qualitative study to explore this further with those who worked in the treatment unit. Semi-structured, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted with 20 UK military personnel deployed between October 2014 and April 2015 in (...)
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  • Defining the Limits of Emergency Humanitarian Action: Where, and How, to Draw the Line?N. Ford, R. Zachariah, E. Mills & R. Upshur - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):68-71.
    Decisions about targeting medical assistance in humanitarian contexts are fraught with dilemmas ranging from non-availability of basic services, to massive demographic and epidemiological shifts, and to the threat of insecurity and evacuations. Aid agencies are obliged, due to capacity constraints and competing priorities, to clearly define the objectives and the beneficiaries of their actions. That aid agencies have to set limits to their actions is not controversial, but the process of defining the limits raises ethical questions. In MSF, frameworks for (...)
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  • Ethical Challenges Experienced by UK Military Medical Personnel Deployed to Sierra Leone During the 2014–2015 Ebola Outbreak: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Heather Draper & Simon Jenkins - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):1-13.
    Background As part of its response to the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa, the United Kingdom government established an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, staffed by military personnel. Little is known about the ethical challenges experienced by military medical staff on humanitarian deployment. We designed a qualitative study to explore this further with those who worked in the treatment unit. Method Semi-structured, face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted with 20 UK military personnel deployed between October 2014 and April (...)
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