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  1. Improper Communities in the Work of Roberto Esposito and Jacques Rancière.Kevin Inston - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):621-641.
    Recent theories of community aim to think the term beyond its definition as the ownership of shared identity, language, culture or territory. For Esposito, to reduce community to a property whose possession distinguishes members from non-members undermines the commonality the term implies. The common opposes what is proper or one’s own; it belongs to everyone and anyone. Rather than securing identity and belonging, community, defined by its impropriety, disrupts them so that we are in common. While his work successfully illustrates (...)
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  • Community, Immunity, and the Proper an Introduction to the Political Theory of Roberto Esposito.Greg Bird & Jonathan Short - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (3):1-12.
    This article underlines and draws attention to critical insights that Esposito makes regarding the prospects of rethinking community in a globalized world. Alongside Agamben and Nancy, Esposito challenges the property prejudice found in mainstream models of community. In identity politics, collective identity is converted into a form of communal property. Borders, sovereign territories, and exclusive rights are fiercely defended in the name of communal property. Esposito responds to this problem by developing what I call a “deontological communal contract” where being (...)
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  • Improper Communities in the Work of Roberto Esposito and Jacques Rancière.Kevin Inston - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-21.
    Recent theories of community aim to think the term beyond its definition as the ownership of shared identity, language, culture or territory. For Esposito, to reduce community to a property whose possession distinguishes members from non-members undermines the commonality the term implies. The common opposes what is proper or one’s own; it belongs to everyone and anyone. Rather than securing identity and belonging, community, defined by its impropriety, disrupts them so that we are in common. While his work successfully illustrates (...)
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