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  1. Freedom, Self-Ownership, and Equality in Steiner’s Left-Libertarianism.Ronen Shnayderman - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):219-227.
    Hillel Steiner’s left-libertarian theory of justice is the most serious recent attempt to reconcile the ideals of equality and freedom. This attempt consists in an argument that a universal right to equal freedom, which in Steiner’s view means also a universal right to maximal freedom, implies a universal right to self-ownership and to an egalitarian share of the world’s natural resources. In this article, I argue that this argument fails on Steiner’s own terms. I argue that, on Steiner’s conceptions of (...)
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  • Justice and Political Authority in Left-Libertarianism.Fabian Wendt - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (3):316-339.
    From a left-libertarian perspective, it seems almost impossible for states to acquire political authority. For that reason, left-libertarians like Peter Vallentyne understandably hope that states without political authority could nonetheless implement left-libertarian justice. Vallentyne has argued that one can indeed assess a state’s justness without assessing its political authority. Against Vallentyne, I try to show that states without political authority have to be judged unjust even if they successfully promote justice. The reason is that institutions can be unjust independently from (...)
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  • Risk Imposition and Freedom.Maria P. Ferretti - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):261-279.
    Various authors hold that what is wrong with risk imposition is that being at risk diminishes the opportunities available to an agent. Arguably, even when risk does not result in material or psychological damages, it still represents a setback in terms of some legitimate interests. However, it remains to be specified what those interests are. This article argues that risk imposition represents a diminishment of overall freedom. Freedom will be characterized in empirical terms, as the range of unimpeded actions available (...)
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  • The Self-Ownership Proviso: A Critique.Peter Bornschein - 2018 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 17 (4):339-355.
    Recently, Eric Mack, Edward Feser, and Daniel Russell have argued that self-ownership justifies a constraint on the use of property such that an owner’s use of property may not severely negate the ability of others to interact with the world. Mack has labeled this constraint the self-ownership proviso. Adopting this proviso promises right-libertarians a way of avoiding the extreme implications of a no-proviso view, while maintaining a consistent and cohesive position. Nevertheless, I argue that self-ownership cannot ground the constraint on (...)
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  • Option Luck, Gambling, and Fairness.Daniel Butt - 2012 - Ethical Perspectives 19 (3):417-443.
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  • Is the Capability Approach Paternalist?Ian Carter - 2014 - Economics and Philosophy 30 (1):75-98.
    Capability theorists have suggested different, sometimes incompatible, ways in which their approach takes account of the value of freedom, each of which implies a different kind of normative relation between functionings and capabilities. This paper examines three possible accounts of the normative relation between functionings and capabilities, and the implications of each of these accounts in terms of degrees of paternalism. The way in which capability theorists apparently oscillate between these different accounts is shown to rest on an apparent tension (...)
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  • How Gifts and Gambles Preserve Justice.Andrew Williams - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):65-85.
    This paper examines G. A. Cohen's final criticism of Ronald Dworkin's theory of equality of resources, which targets its treatment of inequalities that arise when some individuals make luckier choices than others make. Rebutting Cohen's argument that such option luck inequalities fail to be just in an unqualified sense, the paper argues that choice does not merely render inequality legitimate but instead can sometimes make inequality just. It also examines the relationship between Cohen's criticism and the conception of equality developed (...)
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