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  1. Vernacular Pedagogy.David McNamara - 1991 - British Journal of Educational Studies 39 (3):297 - 310.
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  • Responding to Children's Needs: Amplifying the Caring Ethic.Joan F. Goodman - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):233-248.
    According to care theory the good parent confronting a helpless child has an unmediated impulse to relieve his distress; that impulse grows into a prescriptive ethic of relatedness, often contrasted to the more individualistic ethic of justice. If, however, a child's nature is understood as assertive and competent as well as fragile and dependent; if, in addition, he acquires needs through socialisation and is the beneficiary of inferred needs determined by others, then an ethic of need-gratification is insufficient. Caring theory, (...)
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  • A 'Seamless Enactment' of Citizenship Education.Tristan Mccowan - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):85-99.
    Educational undertakings are subject to disjunctures at three separate stages: in the creation of curricular programmes, in the implementation of these curricula in practice and in their effects on students. These disjunctures are the result of complex ‘leaps’ between ends and means, and between ideal and real. This article proposes a response in the form of ‘seamless enactment’, applied here to citizenship education. Seamless enactment involves, first, the harmonisation of the principles underlying the different stages in the passage of the (...)
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  • Synergies and Balance Between Values Education and Quality Teaching.Terence J. Lovat - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):489-500.
    The article will focus on the implicit values dimension that is evident in research findings concerning quality teaching. Furthermore, it sets out to demonstrate that maximizing the effects of quality teaching requires explicit attention to this values dimension and that this can be achieved through a well-crafted values education program. Evidence for this latter claim will come from international studies as well as from the Australian Government's Values Education Program and, especially from the Values Education Good Practice Schools Project Stage (...)
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  • Scapegoat: John Dewey and the Character Education Crisis.Brian White - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (2):127-144.
    Many conservatives, including some conservative scholars, blame the ideas and influence of John Dewey for what has frequently been called a crisis of character, a catastrophic decline in moral behavior in the schools and society of North America. Dewey’s critics claim that he is responsible for the undermining of the kinds of instruction that could lead to the development of character and the strengthening of the will, and that his educational philosophy and example exert a ubiquitous and disastrous influence on (...)
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  • Respect-Due and Respect-Earned: Negotiating Student–Teacher Relationships.Joan F. Goodman - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):3-17.
    Respect is a cardinal virtue in schools and foundational to our common ethical beliefs, yet its meaning is muddled. For philosophers Kant, Mill, and Rawls, whose influential theories span three centuries, respect includes appreciation of universal human dignity, equality, and autonomy. In their view children, possessors of human dignity, but without perspective and reasoning ability, are entitled only to the most minimal respect. While undeserving of mutual respect they are nonetheless expected to show unilateral respect. Dewey and Piaget, scions of (...)
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  • Educational Research as a Form of Democratic Rationality.John Elliott - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):169–185.
  • Deleuze's New Image of Thought, or Dewey Revisited.Inna Semetsky - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (1):17–29.
    Richard Rorty, in his ‘Consequences of Pragmatism’ (1982), acknowledging the pragmatic direction taken by both modern and postmodern philosophy, declared that ‘James and Dewey were not only waiting at the end of the dialectical road which analytic philosophy traveled, but are waiting at the end of the road which, for example, Foucault and Deleuze are currently traveling’ (Rorty, 1982, p. xviii). This paper does not aim to establish who traveled the farthest along the road posited by Rorty. Instead, its purpose (...)
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  • Taking the Edusemiotic Turn: A Body∼Mind Approach to Education.Inna Semetsky - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):490-506.
    Educational philosophy in English-speaking countries tends to be informed mainly by analytic philosophy common to Western thinking. A welcome alternative is provided by pragmatism in the tradition of Peirce, James and Dewey. Still, the habit of the so-called linguistic turn has a firm grip in terms of analytic philosophy based on the logic of non-contradiction as the excluded middle. A body∼mind approach pertains to the edusemiotic turn that this article elucidates. Importantly, semiotics is not illogical but is informed by the (...)
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  • A Comparison of the Concepts of Democracy and Experience in a Sample of Major Works by Dewey and Freire.Eric Shyman - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1035-1046.
    While theorizing in distinctly different times, distinctly different cultures, and under distinctly different circumstances, notable philosophical similarities can be drawn between John Dewey and Paulo Freire. This article focuses on two major themes evident in a sample of each philosopher's major works, democracy and experience, and draws theoretical comparisons between the way each philosopher approaches these concepts in terms of definition and application to educational and social practice. The author suggests that, despite some paradigmatic differences, the fundamental definitions and uses (...)
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  • Vernacular Pedagogy.David McNamara - 1991 - British Journal of Educational Studies 39 (3):297-310.
  • Women’s Proper Place and Student-Centered Pedagogy.Doris Santoro Gómez - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (5):313-333.