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Frans de Waal, Stephen Macedo, Josiah Ober, Robert Wright, Christine M. Korsgaard & Philip Kitcher (2007). Primates and Philosophers. How Morality Evolved.

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  1.  80
    Meaning in the Lives of Humans and Other Animals.Duncan Purves & Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (2):317-338.
    This paper argues that contemporary philosophical literature on meaning in life has important implications for the debate about our obligations to non-human animals. If animal lives can be meaningful, then practices including factory farming and animal research might be morally worse than ethicists have thought. We argue for two theses about meaning in life: that the best account of meaningful lives must take intentional action to be necessary for meaning—an individual’s life has meaning if and only if the individual acts (...)
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  2. Animal Morality: What is the Debate About?Simon Fitzpatrick - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1151-1183.
    Empirical studies of the social lives of non-human primates, cetaceans, and other social animals have prompted scientists and philosophers to debate the question of whether morality and moral cognition exists in non-human animals. Some researchers have argued that morality does exist in several animal species, others that these species may possess various evolutionary building blocks or precursors to morality, but not quite the genuine article, while some have argued that nothing remotely resembling morality can be found in any non-human species. (...)
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  3.  9
    Scientism and Scientific Thinking.Renia Gasparatou - 2017 - Science & Education 26 (7-9):799-812.
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  4.  8
    Heidegger’s Philosophical Botany.Tristan Moyle - 2017 - Continental Philosophy Review 50 (3):377-394.
    Heidegger argues that for being x to count as ‘alive’ it must satisfy three metaphysical conditions. It must be capable of engaging in active behaviour with a form of intentional directedness that offers to us a “sphere of transposition” into which we can intelligibly “transpose ourselves.” Heidegger’s discussion of these conditions, as they apply to the being of animals, is well-known. But, if his argument is sound, they ought also to apply to the being of plants. Heidegger, unfortunately, does not (...)
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  5.  11
    Kristin Andrews: The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition.Michele Merritt - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):475-481.
  6.  3
    Emotions in Constitutional Institutions.A. Sajo - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (1):44-49.
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  7. Empathy and Morality in Behaviour Readers.Susana Monsó - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):671-690.
    It is tempting to assume that being a moral creature requires the capacity to attribute mental states to others, because a creature cannot be moral unless she is capable of comprehending how her actions can have an impact on the well-being of those around her. If this assumption were true, then mere behaviour readers could never qualify as moral, for they are incapable of conceptualising mental states and attributing them to others. In this paper, I argue against such an assumption (...)
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  8.  10
    Your Dog is Your Teacher: Contemporary Dog Training Beyond Radical Behaviorism.Michał Piotr Pręgowski - 2015 - Society and Animals 23 (6):525-543.
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  9.  65
    Scientific and Religious Approaches to Morality: An Alternative to Mutual Anathemas.Stephen J. Pope - 2013 - Zygon 48 (1):20-34.
    Many people today believe that scientific and religious approaches to morality are mutually incompatible. Militant secularists claim scientific backing for their claim that the evolution of morality discredits religious conceptions of ethics. Some of their opponents respond with unhelpful apologetics based on fundamentalist views of revelation. This article attempts to provide an alternative option. It argues that public discussion has been excessively influenced by polemics generated by the new atheists. Religious writers have too often resorted to overly simplistic arguments rooted (...)
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  10.  39
    Moral Ape Philosophy.Jelle de Boer - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (6):891-904.
    Our closest relative the chimpanzee seems to display proto-moral behavior. Some scholars emphasize the similarities between humans and chimpanzees, others some key differences. This paper aims is to formulate a set of intermediate conditions between a sometimes helpful chimpanzee and moral man. I specify these intermediate conditions as requirements for the chimpanzees, and for each requirement I take on a verificationist stance and ask what the empirical conditions that satisfy it would be. I ask what would plausibly count as the (...)
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  11. Varieties of Altruism.Philip Kitcher - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):121-148.
    Discussions of altruism occur in three importantly different contexts. During the past four decades, evolutionary theory has been concerned with the possibility that forms of behaviour labelled as altruistic could emerge and could be maintained under natural selection. In these discussions, an agent A is said to act altruistically towards a beneficiary B when A's action promotes the expected reproductive success of B at expected reproductive cost to A. This sort of altruism, biological altruism, is quite different from the kind (...)
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  12.  19
    Inductive Modeling Using Causal Studies in Neuroeconomics: Brains on Drugs.Moana Vercoe & Paul J. Zak - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):133-146.
    This paper introduces a new approach to economic analysis. We show how to move from deductive to inductive modeling and thereby reunite economics with approaches used in the natural sciences. This paper presents the empathy-generosity-punishment model as an example of research based on observation, experimentation, and the elimination of alternatives. Inductive modeling in neuroeconomics allows the identification of the physiologic mechanisms that produce behavior. Unlike most neuroeconomics studies, we show how to establish causation by using drugs to manipulate brain activity. (...)
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  13.  68
    Moral Apes, Human Uniqueness, and the Image of God.Oliver Putz - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):613-624.
    Recent advances in evolutionary biology and ethology suggest that humans are not the only species capable of empathy and possibly morality. These findings are of no little consequence for theology, given that a nonhuman animal as a free moral agent would beg the question if human beings are indeed uniquely created in God's image. I argue that apes and some other mammals have moral agency and that a traditional interpretation of the imago Dei is incorrectly equating specialness with exclusivity. By (...)
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