Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Tractatus and the Riddles of Philosophy.Gilad Nir - 2021 - Philosophical Investigations 44 (1):19-42.
    The notion of the riddle plays a pivotal role in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus . By examining the comparisons he draws between philosophical problems and riddles, this paper offers a reassessment of the aims and methods of the book. Solving an ordinary riddle does not consist in learning a new fact; what it requires is that we transform the way we use words. Similarly, Wittgenstein proposes to transform the way philosophers understand the nature of their problems. But since he holds that these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • G.E.M. Anscombe on the Analogical Unity of Intention in Perception and Action.Christopher Frey & Jennifer A. Frey - 2017 - Analytic Philosophy 58 (3):202-247.
    Philosophers of action and perception have reached a consensus: the term ‘intentionality’ has significantly different senses in their respective fields. But Anscombe argues that these distinct senses are analogically united in such a way that one cannot understand the concept if one focuses exclusively on its use in one’s preferred philosophical sub-discipline. She highlights three salient points of analogy: (i) intentional objects are given by expressions that employ a “description under which;” (ii) intentional descriptions are typically vague and indeterminate; and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Purifying applied mathematics and applying pure mathematics: how a late Wittgensteinian perspective sheds light onto the dichotomy.José Antonio Pérez-Escobar & Deniz Sarikaya - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (1):1-22.
    In this work we argue that there is no strong demarcation between pure and applied mathematics. We show this first by stressing non-deductive components within pure mathematics, like axiomatization and theory-building in general. We also stress the “purer” components of applied mathematics, like the theory of the models that are concerned with practical purposes. We further show that some mathematical theories can be viewed through either a pure or applied lens. These different lenses are tied to different communities, which endorse (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Wittgenstein's Reductio.Gilad Nir - 2022 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 10 (3).
    By means of a reductio argument, Wittgenstein’s Tractatus calls into question the very idea that we can represent logical form. My paper addresses three interrelated questions: first, what conception of logical form is at issue in this argument? Second, whose conception of logic is this argument intended to undermine? And third, what could count as an adequate response to it? I show that the argument construes logical form as the universal, underlying correlation of any representation and the reality it represents. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Toward a Resolute Reading of Being and Time: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, and the Dilemma Between Inconsistency and Ineffability.Gilad Nir - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):572-605.
    Both Heidegger and Wittgenstein consider the possibility of a philosophical inquiry of an absolutely universal scope—an inquiry into the being of all beings, in Heidegger’s case, and into the logical form of everything that can be meaningfully said, in Wittgenstein’s. Moreover, they both raise the worry that the theoretical language by means of which we speak of particular beings and assert particular facts is not suited to this task. And yet their own philosophical work seems to include many assertions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Truth, Paradox, and Ineffable Propositions.James R. Shaw - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):64-104.
    I argue that on very weak assumptions about truth (in particular, that there are coherent norms governing the use of "true"), there is a proposition absolutely inexpressible with conventional language, or something very close. I argue for this claim "constructively": I use a variant of the Berry Paradox to reveal a particular thought for my readership to entertain that very strongly resists conventional expression. I gauge the severity of this expressive limitation within a taxonomy of expressive failures, and argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • 'Around the Axis of Our Real Need': On the Ethical Point of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.Victor J. Krebs - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):344–374.
  • Wittgenstein on the Substance of the World.Ian Proops - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):106–126.
    The *Tractatus* contains an argument that there are simple, necessarily existent objects, which, being simple, are suited to be the referents of the names occuring in the final analysis of propositions. The argument is perplexing in its own right, but also for its invocation of the notion of "substance". I argue that if one locates Wittgenstein's conception of substance in the Kantian tradition to which his talk of "substance" alludes, what emerges is an argument that is very nearly--but not quite--cogent.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • On the 'Resolute' Reading of the Tractatus.John Koethe - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):187–204.
    It is customary to divide Wittgenstein’s work into two broad phases, the first culminating in the Tractatus, and the second comprising the writings that began upon his return to philosophy in 1929 and culminating in the Investigations. It is also commonly assumed that the Tractatus propounds various doctrines concerning language and representation, doctrines which are repudiated in the later work, and often criticized explicitly. One problem with this view of the Trac- tatus is Wittgenstein’s claim in 6.54 that its propositions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Wittgenstein’s True Thoughts.Andrew Lugg - 2013 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 2 (1):33-56.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nordic Wittgenstein Review Jahrgang: 2 Heft: 1 Seiten: 33-56.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • How to Read the Tractatus Sequentially.Tim Kraft - 2016 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2):91-124.
    One of the unconventional features of Wittgenstein’s _Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus_ is its use of an elaborated and detailed numbering system. Recently, Bazzocchi, Hacker und Kuusela have argued that the numbering system means that the _Tractatus_ must be read and interpreted not as a sequentially ordered book, but as a text with a two-dimensional, tree-like structure. Apart from being able to explain how the _Tractatus_ was composed, the tree reading allegedly solves exegetical issues both on the local and the global level. This (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Whistling in 1929: Ramsey and Wittgenstein on the Infinite.S. J. Methven - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):651-669.
    Cora Diamond has recently criticised as mere legend the interpretation of a quip of Ramsey's, contained in the epigraph below, which takes him to be objecting to or rejecting Wittgenstein's Tractarian distinction between saying and showing. Whilst I agree with Diamond's discussion of the legend, I argue that her interpretation of the quip has little evidential support, and runs foul of a criticism sometimes made against intuitionism. Rather than seeing Ramsey as making a claim about the nature of propositions, as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Logical Form and the Limits of Thought.Manish Oza - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    What is the relation of logic to thinking? My dissertation offers a new argument for the claim that logic is constitutive of thinking in the following sense: representational activity counts as thinking only if it manifests sensitivity to logical rules. In short, thinking has to be minimally logical. An account of thinking has to allow for our freedom to question or revise our commitments – even seemingly obvious conceptual connections – without loss of understanding. This freedom, I argue, requires that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “In a Certain Sense We Cannot Make Mistakes in Logic” — Wittgenstein, Psychologism and the So-Called Normativity of Logic.Gilad Nir - 2021 - Disputatio 10 (18):165-185.
    Wittgenstein’s Tractatus construes the nature of reasoning in a manner which sharply conflicts with the conventional wisdom that logic is normative, not descriptive of thought. For although we sometimes seem to reason incorrectly, Wittgenstein denies that we can make logical mistakes (5.473). My aim in this paper is to show that the Tractatus provides us with good reasons to rethink some of the central assumptions that are standardly made in thinking about the relation between logic and thought. In particular, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Snakes and Ladders’ – ‘Therapy’ as Liberation in Nagarjuna and Wittgenstein’s Tractatus.Joshua William Smith - 2021 - Sophia 60 (2):411-430.
    This paper reconsiders the notion that Nagarjuna and Wittgenstein’s Tractatus may only be seen as comparable under a shared ineffability thesis, that is, the idea that reality is impossible to describe in sensible discourse. Historically, Nagarjuna and the early Wittgenstein have both been widely construed as offering either metaphysical theories or attempts to refute all such theories. Instead, by employing an interpretive framework based on a ‘resolute’ reading of the Tractatus, I suggest we see their philosophical affinity in terms of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Concept of Testimony.Nicola Mößner - 2011 - In Christoph Jäger & Winfried Löffler (eds.), Epistemology: Contexts, Values, Disagreement, Papers of the 34. International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. pp. 207-209.
    Many contributors of the debate about knowledge by testimony concentrate on the problem of justification. In my paper I will stress a different point – the concept of testimony itself. As a starting point I will use the definitional proposal of Jennifer Lackey. She holds that the concept of testimony should be regarded as entailing two aspects – one corresponding to the speaker, the other one to the hearer. I will adopt the assumption that we need to deal with both (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Possible Resolution of the Tractarian Paradox.Andreas Georgallides - 2021 - Open Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):148-158.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Tractatus, Application and Use.Martin Stokhof & Jaap van der Does - 2020 - Open Philosophy 3 (1):770-797.
    The article argues for a contextualised reading of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. It analyses in detail the role that use and application play in the text and how that supports a conception of transcendentality of logic that allows for contextualisation. The article identifies a tension in the text, between the requirement that sense be determinate and the contextual nature of application, and suggests that it is this tension that is a major driver of Wittgenstein’s later ideas.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rational Argument in Moral Philosophy: Some Implications of Gordon Baker's Therapeutic Conception of Philosophy.Christopher Lawton - unknown
    This work is an investigation into philosophical method and rational argument in moral philosophy. It makes an original contribution to human understanding, by taking some of the tools and techniques that Gordon Baker identifies in the later work of Wittgenstein, and using them as a way of fending for oneself in an area of philosophy that neither Baker, nor Wittgenstein, wrote on. More specifically, a discussion of some different aspects of the contemporary literature on Dancy’s moral particularism is used as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Standing Before a Sentence: Moore's Paradox and a Perspective From Within Language.Yrsa Neuman - 2015 - Dissertation, Åbo Akademi University
    Ludwig Wittgenstein once wrote to G.E. Moore that he had stirred up a philosophical wasps’ nest with his paradox, associated with the sentence “I believe it’s raining and it’s not raining”. The problem is that it would be odd for a speaker to assert this thought about herself, although it could be true about her, and although the sentence is well-formed and not contradictory. -/- Making use of the notion of a sentence having sense in a context of significant use (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ética y Sinsentido. Kierkegaard y Wittgenstein.Patricia C. Dip - 2003 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 24:9-29.
    Aunque existen coincidencias entre las ideas de Kierkegaard y Wittgenstein con respecto a la ética, sus proyectos no son idénticos. El propósito principal de este artículo es subrayar que la concepción de Kierkegaard sobre la ética no tiene nada que ver con lo que el primer Wittgenstein entiende de ella. Mientras que en el Tractatus no es posible desarrollar una “teoría ética”, Kierkegaard nos permite discutirlo desde un punto de vista ético. Por lo tanto, la relación entre la comunicación indirecta (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Stanley Cavell on What We Say.Arata Hamawaki - 2021 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 9 (9).
    In his early essay, “Must We Mean What We Say”, Cavell argues that the claims of ordinary language philosophers regarding “what we say when” are not empirical generalizations about a given group of speakers but are rather to be understood as measuring the limits of what counts as a coherent act of thinking and speaking. Cavell’s charge against the skeptic about the external world is that he seeks to think and speak beyond these limits. In this paper I compare Cavell’s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nonsense and the New Wittgenstein.Edmund Dain - 2006 - Dissertation, Cardiff University
    This thesis focuses on 'New' or 'Resolute' readings of Wittgenstein's work, early and later, as presented in the work of, for instance, Cora Diamond and James Conant. One of the principal claims of such readings is that, throughout his life, Wittgenstein held an 'austere' view of nonsense. That view has both a trivial and a non-trivial aspect. The trivial aspect is that any string of signs could, by appropriate assignment, be given a meaning, and hence that, if such a string (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Putnam, Context, and Ontology.Steven Gross - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (4):507 - 553.
    When a debate seems intractable, with little agreement as to how one might proceed towards a resolution, it is understandable that philosophers should consider whether something might be amiss with the debate itself. Famously in the last century, philosophers of various stripes explored in various ways the possibility that at least certain philosophical debates are in some manner deficient in sense. Such moves are no longer so much in vogue. For one thing, the particular ways they have been made have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Rise and Fall of Computational Functionalism.Oron Shagrir - 2005 - In Yemima Ben-Menahem (ed.), Hilary Putnam (Contemporary Philosophy in Focus). Cambridge University Press.
  • Three Wittgensteins: Interpreting the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.Thomas J. Brommage - 2008 - Dissertation,
    There are historically three main trends in understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. The first is the interpretation offered by the Vienna Circle. They read Wittgenstein as arguing that neither metaphysical nor normative propositions have any cognitive meaning, and thus are to be considered nonsense. This interpretation understands Wittgenstein as setting the limits of sense, and prescribing that nothing of substantive philosophical importance lies beyond that line. The second way of reading the Tractatus, which has became popular since the 1950s, is the interpretation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Quest for Purity: Another Look at the New Wittgenstein.Martin Stokhof - 2011 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):275-294.
    This short note takes another look at the ideas proposed by the ‘New Wittgen steinians’, focusing on a feature of the discussion these ideas have generated that hitherto seems to have received comparatively little attention, viz., certain assumptions about the conception of philosophy as an intellectual enterprise, including its relation to the sciences, that seem to be adopted by both the New Wittgensteinians and (many of) their critics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Review of José Zalabardo, Representation and Reality in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. [REVIEW]Joshua Eisenthal - 2021 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 9 (6).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • نگاهی انتقادی به تفسیر درمان‌گرانه (ضدمتافیزیکی) از تراکتاتوس، و خوانش کرکگوری از ویتگنشتاین اول.علی صادقی - 2020 - پژوهشنامه فلسفه دین 17 (2):177-199.
    در برابر تفسیر سنتی از تراکتاتوس، که مطابق آن گزاره‌های بی‌معنای تراکتاتوس به دو دستۀ بی‌معنای گمراه‌کننده و بی‌معنای روشنگر تقسیم می‌شوند، در دهۀ 1980 تفسیر جدیدِ درمانگرانه از تراکتاتوس شکل گرفت که به مخالفت با این ایدۀ مرکزی تفسیر سنتی پرداخت و گفت اولاً تراکتاتوس میان گزاره‌های بی‌معنا هیچ تفکیکی قائل نمی‌شود و همۀ بی‌معناها را بی‌معنای محض می‌داند و در یک دسته قرار می‌دهد، ثانیاً هدف تراکتاتوس نه انتقال یک معرفت نظری، بلکه القای یک بینش عملی است. جیمز (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ramsey, ‘Universals’ and Atomic Propositions.S. J. Methven - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):134-154.
    ABSTRACTIn ‘Universals’, Ramsey declares that we do not, and cannot, know the forms of atomic propositions. A year later, in a symposium with Braithwaite and Joseph, he announces a change of mind: atomic propositions may, after all, be discoverable by analysis. It is clear from the 1926 paper that Ramsey intends this to be a revision of the 1925 claim. Puzzlingly, however, Ramsey does not mention analysis in 1925. My task in this article is to provide a justification for that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century - a Review.Paul Livingston - 2006 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):290 – 311.
    After more than a century of its development, philosophers working in the analytic tradition have recently begun to consider its history as an object of philosophical investigation.1 This development, particularly significant in the context of a tradition of inquiry that has often conceived of its own problems as ahistorical, is salutary in that it offers to show what, within the tradition, remains rich and vital for philosophy today, as well as to extract the significant theoretical and doctrinal results that can (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Some Philosophers Wouldn't Dream of Counting as Part of Their Job.Sofia Miguens - 2011 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 67 (1):129 - 141.
    American philosopher Cora Diamond's view of the materials admissible in moral philosophy is bound to strike many analytic philosophers as too broad: they wouldn't dream of thinking of them (namely of literature) as 'part of their job'. This, of course, assumes a conception of the nature of the such job, one in regard to which Diamond expresses doubts of several kinds. In this paper I search for different reasons for those doubts and then try to make the connection clear between (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Face of Perception.Charles S. Travis - 2005 - In Hilary Putnam (Contemporary Philosophy in Focus). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.