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  1. Unsettling Feminist Philosophy: An Encounter with Tracey Moffatt's Night Cries.Shelley M. Park - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):97-122.
    This essay seeks to unsettle feminist philosophy through an encounter with Aboriginal artist Tracey Moffatt, whose perspectives on intergenerational relationships between white women and Indigenous women are shaped by her experiences as the Aboriginal child of a white foster mother growing up in Brisbane, Australia during the 1960s. Moffatt's short experimental film Night Cries provides an important glimpse into the violent intersections of gender, race, and power in intimate life and, in so doing, invites us to see how colonial and (...)
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  • Symposium: Maternal Thinking for International Relations? Papers in Honor of Sara Ruddick.Fiona Robinson & Catia C. Confortini - 2014 - Journal of International Political Theory 10 (1):38-45.
    Using the debate surrounding the Canadian government’s 2008 Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health as a central example, this article considers the construction of women and women’s health in global health policy. Specifically, it considers the contributions of Sara Ruddick’s philosophy to the task of unravelling the ethical and political meanings of ‘motherhood’, and the relationship between maternal thinking and feminist politics in global social policy. This article argues that while Ruddick’s Maternal Thinking has often been read as (...)
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  • “When You Thought That There Is No One and Nothing”: The Value of Psychodrama in Working With Abused Women.Mihaela D. Bucuţă, Gabriela Dima & Ines Testoni - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Motherhood, Sexuality, and Pregnant Embodiment: Twenty-Five Years of Gestation.Kelly Oliver - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):760-777.
    My essay is framed by Hypatia's first special issue on Motherhood and Sexuality at one end, and by the most recent special issue (as of this writing) on the work of Iris Young, whose work on pregnant embodiment has become canonical, at the other. The questions driving this essay are: When we look back over the last twenty-five years, what has changed in our conceptions of pregnancy and maternity, both in feminist theory and in popular culture? What aspects of feminist (...)
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  • Rethinking Ruddick and the Ethnocentrism Critique of Maternal Thinking.Jean Keller - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):834-851.
    In the early 1990s, Sara Ruddick's Maternal Thinking was criticized for harboring a latent ethnocentrism. Ruddick responded to these critiques in the 1995 edition of her book, but her response has not yet been addressed in the feminist philosophical literature. This essay addresses this lacuna in the scholarship on Ruddick. In the last installment of this critique, Alison Bailey and Patrice DiQuinzio suggested that the only way for Ruddick to avoid the ethnocentrism charge would require her near-universalistic claims about mothering (...)
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  • Motherhood in the Context of Normative Discourse: Birth Stories of Mothers of Children with Down Syndrome.Susan L. Gabel & Kathy Kotel - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (2):179-193.
    Using birth stories as our object of inquiry, this article examines the ways in which normative discourses about gender, disability and Down syndrome construct the birth stories of three mothers of children with Down syndrome. Their stories are composed of the mothers’ recollections of the first hours after birth as a time when their infants are separated from them and their postpartum needs are ignored. Together, their stories illustrate socio-cultural tropes that position Down syndrome as a dangerous form of the (...)
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  • Shatter Not the Branches of the Tree of Anger: Mothering, Affect, and Disability.Susan L. Gabel - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):553-568.
    Using the social interpretation of disability, Foucault's theory of disciplinary power, literary devices, and feminist literature, I write an affective narrative of mothering disabled children. In doing so I illustrate the ways in which the materiality of normalcy, surveillance, and embodiment can produce emotions that create docile mothers ashamed of their contribution to the world, conflicted mothers struggling with dissonant affects, and unruly, angry mothers battling against the architectures of their children's oppression.
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