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Citizenship and the Environment

Oxford University Press (2003)

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  1. Global and Ecological Justice: Prioritising Conflicting Demands.Marcel Wissenburg - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (4):425-439.
    'Global and ecological justice ' is a very popular catchphrase in policy documents, treaties, publications by think - tanks, NGOs and other bodies. I argue that it represents an informal combination of four distinct and sometimes conflicting ideas: global justice, protection of the ecology, sustainability and sustainable growth. To solve the practical, conceptual and logical complications thus caused, a more precise interpretation of global justice and ecological justice is suggested, on the basis of which it is also possible to rank (...)
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  • An Imaginary Solution? The Green Defence of Deliberative Democracy.Manuel Arias-Maldonado - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (2):233 - 252.
    As part of the recent rethinking of green politics, the construction of a green democracy has been subjected to increasing scrutiny. There is a growing consensus around deliberative democracy as the preferred model for the realisation of the green programme. As a result several arguments emerge when deliberative principles and procedures are to be justified from a green standpoint. This paper offers a critical assessment of the green case for deliberative democracy, showing that deliberation is being asked to deliver more (...)
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  • Ecological Citizenship: Habitus of Care in the Public Sphere.Aistė Bartkienė, Renata Bikauskaitė & Marius Povilas Šaulauskas - 2018 - Problemos 93.
    [full article, abstract in English; only abstract in Lithuanian] While scholars and popular writers often stress individual responsibility as a way of saving nature, there is a growing understanding that “doing one’s bit” may not be enough to address local and global environmental issues. Focusing on the concept of ecological citizenship as a starting point, our paper seeks to explore the concept of ecological citizenship and show how individualized experiences and socially and culturally embedded practices of care for the environment (...)
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  • Ecological Ethics: The Road of Responsibility Towards Global Bioethics.Juan Alberto Lecaros - 2013 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 4 (4):201-215.
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  • The Who and the What of Educational Cosmopolitanism.Hannah Spector - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):423-440.
    In the educational strand of cosmopolitanism, much attention has been placed on theorizing and describing who is cosmopolitan. It has been argued that cosmopolitan sensibilities negotiate and/or embody such paradoxes as rootedness and rootlessness, local and global concerns, private and public identities. Concurrently, cosmopolitanism has also been formulated as a globally-minded project for and ethico-political responsibility to human rights and global justice. Such articulations underscore cosmopolitanism in anthropocentric terms. People can be cosmopolitan and cosmopolitan projects aim to cultivate cosmopolitan subjectivities. (...)
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  • Business and the Polis: What Does It Mean to See Corporations as Political Actors? [REVIEW]Pierre-Yves Néron - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):333-352.
    This article addresses the recent call in business ethics literature for a better understanding of corporations as political actors or entities. It first gives an overview of recent attempts to examine classical issues in business ethics through a political lens. It examines different ways in which theorists with an interest in the normative analysis of business practices and institutions could find it desirable and fruitful to use a political lens. This article presents a distinction among four views of the relations (...)
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  • Justifying Compulsory Environmental Education in Liberal Democracies.Anders Schinkel - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):507-526.
    The need for education for (as opposed to about) sustainability is urged from many sides. Initiatives in this area tend to focus on formal education. Governmental, supra-governmental and non-governmental bodies all expect much of this kind of education, which is to transform children—and through them society—in the direction of sustainability. Due to the combination of great transformative expectations or ambitions and a focus on schooling (the idea of) compulsory environmental education poses potentially severe problems for governments committed to liberal principles, (...)
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  • The Normative Limits of Consumer Citizenship.Angela Kallhoff - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (1):23-34.
    In political philosophy, citizenship is a key concept. Citizenship is tied to rights and duties, as well as to concepts of social justice. Recently, the debate on citizenship has developed a new direction in focusing on qualified notions of citizenship. In this contribution, I shall defend three claims. Firstly, consumer citizenship fits into the discussion of qualified notions of citizenship. Secondly, the debate on qualified notions of citizenship cannot be detached from the normative claims in the philosophy of citizenship more (...)
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  • Mobility, Embodiment, and Scales: Filipino Immigrant Perspectives on Local Food. [REVIEW]J. M. Valiente-Neighbours - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):531-541.
    Local foodshed proponents in the United States seek to change the food system through campaigns to “buy local” and to rediscover “good food” in the local foodshed. Presumably, common sense dictates that the word “local” signifies spatial proximity to the consumer. For some populations, however, both the terms “local” and “local food” signify various different meanings. The local food definition generally used by scholars and activists alike as “geographically proximate food” is unhelpfully narrow. Localist rhetoric often does not incorporate the (...)
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  • The Poverty of Postnationalism: Citizenship, Immigration, and the New Europe. [REVIEW]Randall Hansen - 2009 - Theory and Society 38 (1):1-24.
  • Natural Subjects: Nature and Political Community.Kimberly K. Smith - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):343 - 353.
    Environmental political theory poses new challenges to our received political concepts and values. Increasingly, we are reconceptualising nature as a subject rather than solely an object of politics. On one front, we are being challenged to think of natural entities as subjects of justice – as bearers of rights or interests that the political system should accommodate. On a second front, we are being challenged to see nature as a subject of power, constructed and ordered through scientific and political practice. (...)
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  • Responsibility and Agency Within Alternative Food Networks: Assembling the “Citizen Consumer”. [REVIEW]Stewart Lockie - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):193-201.
    With “consumer demand” credited with driving major changes in the food industry related to food quality, safety, environmental, and social concerns, the contemporary politics of food has become characterized by a variety of attempts to redefine food consumption as an expression of citizenship that speaks of collective rights and responsibilities. Neoliberal political orthodoxy constructs such citizenship in terms of the ability of individuals to monitor and regulate their own behavior as entrepreneurs and as consumers. By contrast, many proponents of alternative (...)
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