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  1. Moments of realization: extending Homeworld in British-African Novelist Doris Lessing’s Four-Gated City.David Seamon - forthcoming - Continental Philosophy Review:1-17.
    For Husserl, the homeworld is the tacit, taken-for-granted sphere of experiences, understanding, and situations marking out a world that is comfortable, usual, and “the way things are and should be.” Always, according to Husserl, the homeworld is in some mode of lived mutuality with an alienworld—a world as seen as a realm of difference, atypicality, and otherness. In this article, I draw on British-African novelist Doris Lessing’s 1969 novel, The Four-Gated City, to consider the shifting homeworld of protagonist Martha Quest, (...)
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  • The Pluralistic Concept of the Life-World and the Various Fields of the Phenomenology of the Life-World in Husserl.Nam-In Lee - 2020 - Husserl Studies 36 (1):47-68.
    The life-world is a central topic of Husserl’s phenomenology. He addresses this issue in some of the works published during his lifetime and attempts to analyze the life-world extensively in many of his works and posthumously published research manuscripts. The life-world is one of the topics that have been discussed most extensively in phenomenology. However, there are many misunderstandings of Husserl’s phenomenology of the life-world. One misunderstanding concerns the variety of concepts of the life-world in Husserl and the possibility of (...)
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  • Naturalism, Objectivism and Everyday Life.Eran Dorfman - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:117-133.
    In this paper I analyse the role of naturalism and objectivism in everyday life according to Husserl and Merleau-Ponty. Whereas Husserl attributes the naturalistic attitude mainly to science, he defines the objectivist attitude as a naiveté which equally applies to the natural attitude of everyday life. I analyse the relationship between the natural attitude and lived experience and show Husserl's hesitation regarding the task of phenomenology in describing the lived experience of everyday life, since he considers this experience to be (...)
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