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  1. Goods, Causes and Intentions: Problems with Applying the Doctrine of Double Effect to Palliative Sedation.Michel C. F. Shamy, Susan Lamb, Ainsley Matthewson, David G. Dick, Claire Dyason, Brian Dewar & Hannah Faris - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundPalliative sedation and analgesia are employed in patients with refractory and intractable symptoms at the end of life to reduce their suffering by lowering their level of consciousness. The doctrine of double effect, a philosophical principle that justifies doing a “good action” with a potentially “bad effect,” is frequently employed to provide an ethical justification for this practice. Main textWe argue that palliative sedation and analgesia do not fulfill the conditions required to apply the doctrine of double effect, and therefore (...)
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  • Considering Intentions in Decision Making: What Is So Odd About It?Anton Markoč - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (4):481-498.
    An influential objection to the view that intentions are non-derivatively relevant to the moral permissibility of actions states that if intentions were relevant to permissibility in such a way, one would have to take them into account in decision making, which would be odd (in some morally relevant sense of ‘oddness’). The paper outlines and assesses three candidates for the oddness: that considering intentions in decision making is an unordinary practice, that it is impossible or conceptually confused, and that it (...)
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  • Knowing, Anticipating, Even Facilitating but Still Not Intending: Another Challenge to Double Effect Reasoning.S. Duckett - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):33-37.
    A recent administrative law decision in Victoria, Australia, applied double effect reasoning in a novel way. Double effect reasoning has hitherto been used to legitimate treatments which may shorten life but where the intent of treatment is pain relief. The situation reviewed by the Victorian tribunal went further, supporting actions where a doctor agrees to provide pentobarbitone to a patient at some time in the future if the patient feels at that time that his pain is unbearable and he wants (...)
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  • Moral Concerns with Sedation at the End of Life.Charles Douglas - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):241-241.
    Two studies reported in the Journal of Medical Ethics add to the growing body of qualitative evidence relating to the use of sedatives at the end of life.1 ,2 Respondents in the two studies affirm a number of important concerns, most of which have been elaborated in the philosophy and palliative care literature, relating to the use of sedation. There seems little doubt that the common moral thread to most of these concerns is the possibility that end-of-life sedation can resemble (...)
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  • Distress From Voluntary Refusal of Food and Fluids to Hasten Death: What is the Role of Continuous Deep Sedation?: Figure 1.Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):510-512.
    In assisted dying, the end-of-life trajectory is shortened to relieve unbearable suffering. Unbearable suffering is defined broadly enough to include cognitive (early dementia), psychosocial or existential distress. It can include old-age afflictions that are neither life-threatening nor fatal in the “vulnerable elderly”. The voluntary refusal of food and fluids (VRFF) combined with continuous deep sedation (CDS) for assisted dying is legal. Scientific understanding of awareness of internal and external nociceptive stimuli under CDS is rudimentary. CDS may blunt the wakefulness component (...)
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  • Was ist das Problematische an der Palliativen Sedierung? – eine ÜbersichtWhat is problematic with palliative sedation?: a review.Bernd Alt-Epping, Friedemann Nauck & Birgit Jaspers - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (3):219-231.
    ZusammenfassungDie Palliative Sedierung als therapeutische Handlungsoption in anderweitig refraktären Behandlungssituationen wird in der Öffentlichkeit und in Fachkreisen in ihrer klinischen Wertigkeit grundsätzlich akzeptiert und weitgehend positiv konnotiert. Im Widerspruch dazu fallen sowohl die Quantität der empirischen Forschung als auch die Intensität der ethischen und klinischen Diskussion ins Auge, mit der konzeptuelle als auch durchführungsbezogene Aspekte der Palliativen Sedierung beschrieben und kontrovers erörtert werden. Anstatt eines distinkten Behandlungskonzeptes stellt sich hier eher ein komplexes Spektrum verschiedener Vorgehensweisen dar. Die folgende Übersichtsarbeit fasst (...)
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