Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Progressive and the Imperfective Paradox.Alex Lascarides - 1991 - Synthese 87 (3):401 - 447.
  • Temporal Adverbials, Tenses and the Perfect.Frank Vlach - 1993 - Linguistics and Philosophy 16 (3):231 - 283.
  • Temporal Semantics in a Superficially Tenseless Language.Lisa Matthewson - 2006 - Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (6):673 - 713.
    This paper contributes to the debate about ‘tenseless languages’ by defending a tensed analysis of a superficially tenseless language. The language investigated is St’át’imcets (Lillooet Salish). I argue that although St’át’imcets lacks overt tense morphology, every finite clause in the language possesses a phonologically covert tense morpheme; this tense morpheme restricts the reference time to being non-future. Future interpretations, as well as ‘past future’ would-readings, are obtained by the combination of covert tense with an operator analogous to Abusch’s (1985) WOLL. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Review. [REVIEW]Erhard Hinrichs - 1989 - Linguistics and Philosophy 12 (2):243-267.
  • Prepositions and Points of View.M. J. Cresswell - 1978 - Linguistics and Philosophy 2 (1):1 - 41.
  • Reference Time and the English Past Tenses.W. P. M. Meyer-Viol & H. S. Jones - 2011 - Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (3):223-256.
    We offer a formal account of the English past tenses. We see the perfect as having reference time at speech time and the preterite as having reference time at event time. We formalize four constraints on reference time, which we bundle together under the term ‘perspective’. Once these constraints are satisfied at the different reference times of the perfect and preterite, the contrasting functions of these tenses are explained. Thus we can account formally for the ‘definiteness effect’ and the ‘lifetime (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unifying the Imperfective and the Progressive: Partitions as Quantificational Domains. [REVIEW]Ashwini Deo - 2009 - Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (5):475-521.
    This paper offers a new unified theory about the meaning of the imperfective and progressive aspects that builds on earlier of analyses in the literature that treat the imperfective as denoting a universal quantifier (e.g. Bonomi, Linguist Philos, 20(5):469–514, 1997; Cipria and Roberts, Nat Lang Semant 8(4):297–347, 2000). It is shown that the problems associated with such an analysis can be overcome if the domain of the universal quantifier is taken to be a partition of a future extending interval into (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Counterfactuality and Past.Kilu von Prince - 2019 - Linguistics and Philosophy 42 (6):577-615.
    Many languages have past-and-counterfactuality markers such as English simple past. There have been various attempts to find a common definition for both uses, but I will argue in this paper that they all have problems with ruling out unacceptable interpretations, or accounting for the contrary-to-fact implicature of counterfactual conditionals, or predicting the observed cross-linguistic variation, or a combination thereof. By combining insights from two basic lines of reasoning, I will propose a simple and transparent approach that solves all the observed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Fundamentally Different Perspectives on Time.Jesse M. Mulder - 2017 - Axiomathes 27 (3):295-320.
    Frege taught us how to understand one form of predication: an atemporal one. There is also a different, temporal form of predication, which I briefly introduce. Accordingly, there are two fundamentally different approaches to time: a reductive one, aiming to account for time in terms of Frege’s atemporal predication, and a non-reductive one, insisting that the temporal form of predication is sui generis, and that time is to be understood in its terms. I do not directly argue for or against (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Progressive and Verbs of Creation.Alex Silk - 2016 - Journal of Semantics 33 (1):19-48.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Partial Manifestations.Nick Kroll - 2016 - In Morphological, Syntactic and Semantic Aspects of Dispositions. Stuttgart, Germany: pp. 85-91.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Epistemic Modality De Re.Seth Yalcin - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2:475-527.
    Focusing on cases which involve binding into epistemic modals with definite descriptions and quantifiers, I raise some new problems for standard approaches to all of these expressions. The difficulties are resolved in a semantic framework that is dynamic in character. I close with a new class of problems about de re readings within the scope of modals.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Perspectival Plurality, Relativism, and Multiple Indexing.Dan Zeman - 2018 - In Rob Truswell, Chris Cummins, Caroline Heycock, Brian Rabern & Hannah Rohde (eds.), Proceedings of Sinn und Bedeutung 21, Vol. 2. Semantics Archives. pp. 1353-1370.
    In this paper I focus on a recently discussed phenomenon illustrated by sentences containing predicates of taste: the phenomenon of " perspectival plurality " , whereby sentences containing two or more predicates of taste have readings according to which each predicate pertains to a different perspective. This phenomenon has been shown to be problematic for (at least certain versions of) relativism. My main aim is to further the discussion by showing that the phenomenon extends to other perspectival expressions than predicates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Supervenience, Dependence, Disjunction.Lloyd Humberstone - forthcoming - Logic and Logical Philosophy:1.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Non-Transitive Parthood, Leveled Mereology, and the Representation of Emergent Parts of Processes.Johanna Seibt - 2014 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 91:161-190.
  • On the Interaction of Aspect and Modal Auxiliaries.Valentine Hacquard - 2009 - Linguistics and Philosophy 32 (3):279-315.
    This paper discusses the interaction of aspect and modality, and focuses on the puzzling implicative effect that arises when perfective aspect appears on certain modals: perfective somehow seems to force the proposition expressed by the complement of the modal to hold in the actual world, and not merely in some possible world. I show that this puzzling behavior, originally discussed in Bhatt (1999, Covert modality in non-finite contexts) for the ability modal, extends to all modal auxiliaries with a circumstantial modal (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Presuppositions and Implicatures in Counterfactuals.Michela Ippolito - 2003 - Natural Language Semantics 11 (2):145-186.
    In this article, I propose a semantic account of temporally mismatched past subjunctive counterfactuals. The proposal consists of the following parts. First, I show that in cases of temporal mismatch, [past] cannot be interpreted inside the proposition where it occurs at surface structure. Instead, it must be interpreted as constraining the time argument of the accessibility relation. This has the effect of shifting the time of the evaluation of the conditional to some contextually salient past time. Second, I will propose (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Conditional Truth and Future Reference.Stefan Kaufmann - 2005 - Journal of Semantics 22 (3):231-280.
    This paper proposes a compositional model-theoretic account of the way the interpretation of indicative conditionals is determined and constrained by the temporal and modal expressions in their constituents. The main claim is that the tenses in both the antecedent and the consequent of an indicative conditional are interpreted in the same way as in isolation. This is controversial for the antecedents of predictive conditionals like ‘If he arrives tomorrow, she will leave’, whose Present tense is often claimed to differ semantically (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Abilities.John Maier - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In the accounts we give of one another, claims about our abilities appear to be indispensable. Some abilities are so widespread that many who have them take them for granted, such as the ability to walk, or to write one's name, or to tell a hawk from a handsaw. Others are comparatively rare and notable, such as the ability to hit a Major League fastball, or to compose a symphony, or to tell an elm from a beech. In either case, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Eye Movements During Listening Reveal Spontaneous Grammatical Processing.Stephanie Huette, Bodo Winter, Teenie Matlock, David H. Ardell & Michael Spivey - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Comment on the Paper by Cleo Condoravdi.Manfred Krifka - unknown
    The following contribution1 was inspired by Cleo Condoravdi’s article on NPI licensing in temporal clauses (Condoravdi, this volume). Condoravdi gives a coherent and comprehensive account of be- fore which crucially involves coercion of propositions to the earliest or maximal times at which the propositions are true, and a modal component for non-factual interpretations. I argue for a nonmodal, non-coercive analysis of clauses like [A before B] as ‘A is the case when B has not been the case’, triggering a conversational (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Wird Schon Stimmen! A Degree Operator Analysis of Schon.Malte Zimmermann - forthcoming - Journal of Semantics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Higher Order Extensional Framework for the Progressive.K. Varasdi - 2010 - Journal of Semantics 27 (2):177-206.
    This paper proposes an extensional event-based framework for the progressive aspect. The proposal differs from that of Parsons (1990) in that it does not have incomplete events in its base ontology but constructs ‘proxies’ for such events through certain sets of properties of complete events.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Modality and Evidentiality.T. Gunji, S. Kaufmann & Y. Takubo - 2008 - Journal of Semantics 25 (3):221-227.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Developmental Perspective on the Imperfective Paradox.Nina Kazanina & Colin Phillips - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):65-102.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Agential Knowledge, Action and Process.Ben Wolfson - 2012 - Theoria 78 (4):326-357.
  • Worlds, Events, and Inertia.Károly Varasdi - 2017 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 26 (3):303-332.
    The semantics of progressive sentences presents a challenge to linguists and philosophers alike. According to a widely accepted view, the truth-conditions of progressive sentences rely essentially on a notion of inertia. Dowty suggested inertia worlds to implement this “inertia idea” in a formal semantic theory of the progressive. The main thesis of the paper is that the notion of inertia went through a subtle, but crucial change when worlds were replaced by events in Landman and Portner :760–787, 1998), and that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Demonstratives and Indexicals in Montague Grammar.Michael Bennett - 1978 - Synthese 39 (1):1--80.
  • On the Necessity of Distinguishing Between (Un)Boundedness and (a)Telicity.Ilse Depraetere - 1995 - Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (1):1 - 19.
    It is argued that two different types of concept are often intermingled in discussions of Aktionsart. The most common type of classification is one of situation types, relating to the potential actualisation of a situation, although some of the definitions have to do with the actual realization of the situation. This distinction, adequately captured by the notions (a)telicity and (un)boundedness (Declerck 1989), is explored and it is shown how NPs, PPs and tense influence a sentence''s classification as (un)bounded.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Proportions in Time: Interactions of Quantification and Aspect. [REVIEW]Peter Hallman - 2009 - Natural Language Semantics 17 (1):29-61.
    Proportional quantification and progressive aspect interact in English in revealing ways. This paper investigates these interactions and draws conclusions about the semantics of the progressive and telicity. In the scope of the progressive, the proportion named by a proportionality quantifier (e.g. most in The software was detecting most errors) must hold in every subevent of the event so described, indicating that a predicate in the scope of the progressive is interpreted as an internally homogeneous activity. Such an activity interpretation is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Things in Progress.Zoltán Gendler Szabó - 2008 - Philosophical Perspectives 22 (1):499-525.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Beyond the Past, Present, and Future: Towards the Semantics of ‘Graded Tense’ in Gĩkũyũ. [REVIEW]Seth Cable - 2013 - Natural Language Semantics 21 (3):219-276.
    In recent years, our understanding of how tense systems vary across languages has been greatly advanced by formal semantic study of languages exhibiting fewer tense categories than the three commonly found in European languages. However, it has also often been reported that languages can sometimes distinguish more than three tenses. Such languages appear to have ‘graded tense’ systems, where the tense morphology serves to track how far into the past or future a reported event occurs. This paper presents a formal (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Obligation and Aspect.Benj Hellie - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):398-449.
    ‘Fred must open the door’ concerns Fred’s obligations. This obligative meaning is turned off by adding aspect: ‘Fred must have opened/be opening/have been opening the door’ are one and all epistemic. Why? In a nutshell: obligative ’must’ operates on procedural contents of imperative sentences, epistemic ‘must’ on propositional contents of declarative sentences; and adding aspect converts procedural into propositional content.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Verb Aspect and Problem Solving.Meghan M. Salomon, Joseph P. Magliano & Gabriel A. Radvansky - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):134-139.
  • The Semantic Ingredients of Imperfectivity in Progressives, Habituals, and Counterfactuals.Marcelo Ferreira - 2016 - Natural Language Semantics 24 (4):353-397.
    This paper develops a unified analysis for the meaning of imperfective aspect that covers progressives, habituals, and counterfactuals, aiming at an understanding of two crosslinguistically frequent syncretisms: one between progressives and habituals, and one between habituals and counterfactuals. I first discuss progressive and habitual readings in detail, identifying mereological, temporal, and modal ingredients in both interpretations. My claim is that the temporal and modal ingredients are the same, and I propose to differentiate these readings in terms of verbal plurality: progressives (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Progressive and the Perfective.Zoltán Gendler Szabó - 2004 - Noûs 38 (1):29–59.
  • On Behalf of a Mutable Future.Patrick Todd - 2016 - Synthese 193 (7):2077-2095.
    Everyone agrees that we can’t change the past. But what about the future? Though the thought that we can change the future is familiar from popular discourse, it enjoys virtually no support from philosophers, contemporary or otherwise. In this paper, I argue that the thesis that the future is mutable has far more going for it than anyone has yet realized. The view, I hope to show, gains support from the nature of prevention, can provide a new way of responding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Type Shifting in Construction Grammar: An Integrated Approach to Aspectual Coercion.Laura A. Michaelis - 2004 - Cognitive Linguistics 15 (1):1-67.
  • The Progressive in English: Events, States and Processes. [REVIEW]Terence Parsons - 1989 - Linguistics and Philosophy 12 (2):213 - 241.
    This paper has two goals. The first is to formulate an adequate account of the semantics of the progressive aspect in English: the semantics of Agatha is making a cake, as opposed to Agatha makes a cake. This account presupposes a version of the so-called Aristotelian classification of verbs in English into EVENT, PROCESS and STATE verbs. The second goal of this paper is to refine this classification so as to account for the infamous category switch problem, the problem of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations