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  1. What Ethical Resources Are Available to Alcohol and Other Drug Practitioners? A Systematic Review.David Silkoff, Marilys Guillemin, Richard Chenhall & Rosalind McDougall - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):34-52.
    Clinical work in Alcohol and Other Drugs has not generally been an area of focus for ethicists. Likewise, ethics is not usually part of Alcohol and Other Drugs training or practice. This means that resources available to Alcohol and Other Drugs clinicians navigating ethical challenges are not widely available. This paper describes a systematic review of literature at the intersection of ethics and clinical practice in Alcohol and Other Drugs. The review will potentially benefit Alcohol and Other Drug practitioners by (...)
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  • Animal Welfare Concerns and Values of Stakeholders Within the Dairy Industry.B. A. Ventura, M. A. G. von Keyserlingk & D. M. Weary - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):109-126.
    This paper describes the perspectives of stakeholders within the North American dairy industry on key issues affecting the welfare of dairy cattle. Five heterogeneous focus groups were held during a dairy cattle welfare meeting in Guelph, Canada in October 2012. Each group contained between 7 and 10 participants and consisted of a mix of dairy producers, veterinarians, academics, students, and dairy industry specialists. The 1-h facilitated discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis of the resulting transcripts showed that participants (...)
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  • Scientists and Dutch Pig Farmers in Dialogue About Tail Biting: Unravelling the Mechanism of Multi-Stakeholder Learning. [REVIEW]Marianne Benard, Tjerk Jan Schuitmaker & Tjard de Cock Buning - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):431-452.
    Pig farmers and scientists appear to have different perspectives and underlying framing on animal welfare issues as tail biting and natural behaviour of pigs. Literature proposes a joint learning process in which a shared vision is developed. Using two different settings, a symposium and one-to-one dialogues, we aimed to investigate what elements affected joint learning between scientists and pig farmers. Although both groups agreed that more interaction was important, the process of joint learning appeared to be rather potentially dangerous for (...)
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  • Attitudes of Canadian Pig Producers Toward Animal Welfare.Jeffrey M. Spooner, Catherine A. Schuppli & David Fraser - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):569-589.
    As part of a larger study eliciting Canadian producer and non-producer views about animal welfare, open-ended, semi-structured interviews were used to explore opinions about animal welfare of 20 Canadian pig producers, most of whom were involved in confinement-based systems. With the exception of the one organic producer, who emphasized the importance of a “natural” life, participants attached overriding importance to biological health and functioning. They saw their efforts as providing pigs with dry, thermally regulated, indoor environments where animals received abundant (...)
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  • Robotic Milking Technologies and Renegotiating Situated Ethical Relationships on UK Dairy Farms.Lewis Holloway, Christopher Bear & Katy Wilkinson - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):185-199.
    Robotic or automatic milking systems are novel technologies that take over the labor of dairy farming and reduce the need for human–animal interactions. Because robotic milking involves the replacement of ‘conventional’ twice-a-day milking managed by people with a system that supposedly allows cows the freedom to be milked automatically whenever they choose, some claim robotic milking has health and welfare benefits for cows, increases productivity, and has lifestyle advantages for dairy farmers. This paper examines how established ethical relations on dairy (...)
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  • Cows Desiring to Be Milked? Milking Robots and the Co-Evolution of Ethics and Technology on Dutch Dairy Farms.Clemens Driessen & Leonie F. M. Heutinck - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (1):3-20.
    Ethical concerns regarding agricultural practices can be found to co-evolve with technological developments. This paper aims to create an understanding of ethics that is helpful in debating technological innovation by studying such a co-evolution process in detail: the development and adoption of the milking robot. Over the last decade an increasing number of milking robots, or automatic milking systems, has been adopted, especially in the Netherlands and a few other Western European countries. The appraisal of this new technology in ethical (...)
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  • Farming Ethics in Practice: From Freedom to Professional Moral Autonomy for Farmers.Franck L. B. Meijboom & Frans R. Stafleu - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):403-414.
    Food production, water management, land use, and animal and public health are all topics of extensive public debate. These themes are linked to the core activities of the agricultural sector, and more specifically to the work of farmers. Nonetheless, the ethical discussions are mostly initiated by interest groups in society rather than by farmers. At least in Europe, consumer organizations and animal welfare and environmental organizations are more present in the public debate than farmers. This is not how it should (...)
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  • Moral Values and Attitudes Toward Dutch Sow Husbandry.Tamara J. Bergstra, Bart Gremmen & Elsbeth N. Stassen - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):375-401.
    Attitudes toward sow husbandry differ between citizens and conventional pig farmers. Research showed that moral values could only predict the judgment of people in case of culling healthy animals in the course of a disease epidemic to a certain extent. Therefore, we hypothesized that attitudes of citizens and pig farmers cannot be predicted one-on-one by moral values. Furthermore, we were interested in getting insight in whether moral values can be useful in bridging the gap between attitudes toward sow husbandry of (...)
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