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Wim Dubbink, Johan Graafland & Luc van Liedekerke (2008). CSR, Transparency and the Role of Intermediate Organisations.

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  1.  7
    Deeds Not Words: A Cosmopolitan Perspective on the Influences of Corporate Sustainability and NGO Engagement on the Adoption of Sustainable Products in China.C. Moosmayer Dirk, Chen Yanyan & M. Davis Susannah - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    To make a business case for corporate sustainability, firms must be able to sell their sustainable products. The influence that firm engagement with non-governmental organizations may have on consumer adoption of sustainable products has been neglected in previous research. We address this by embedding corporate sustainability in a cosmopolitan framework that connects firms, consumers, and civil society organizations based on the understanding of responsibility for global humanity that underlies both the sustainability and cosmopolitanism concepts. We hypothesize that firms’ sustainability engagement (...)
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  2. Business Infomediary Representations of Corporate Responsibility.Meri Frig, Martin Fougère, Veronica Liljander & Pia Polsa - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):337-351.
    Drawing on the recent discussion about the role information intermediaries play in affecting corporate responsibility adoption, we analyze the representation of CR issues in a business infomediary distributed by a leading business organization. The explicit task of the business infomediary is to promote a competitive national business environment. This paper contributes to research on CR, by providing new knowledge on the current CR discourse within the business community, and research on infomediaries, by introducing a distinction between watchdog-oriented and business-oriented infomediaries. (...)
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    Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
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  4.  28
    Effect of Stakeholders’ Pressure on Transparency of Sustainability Reports Within the GRI Framework.Belen Fernandez-Feijoo, Silvia Romero & Silvia Ruiz - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):53-63.
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  5. Development of Norms Through Compliance Disclosure.Björn Fasterling - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):73-87.
    This article introduces compliance disclosure regimes to business ethics research. Compliance disclosure is a relatively recent regulatory technique whereby companies are obliged to disclose the extent to which they comply with codes, ‘best practice standards’ or other extra-legal texts containing norms or prospective norms. Such ‘compliance disclosure’ obligations are often presented as flexible regulatory alternatives to substantive, command-and-control regulation. However, based on a report on experiences of existing compliance disclosure obligations, this article will identify major weaknesses that prevent them from (...)
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    Organising Corporate Responsibility Communication Through Filtration: A Study of Web Communication Patterns in Swedish Retail. [REVIEW]Magnus Frostenson, Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):31 - 43.
    Corporate responsibility (CR) communication has risen dramatically in recent years, following increased demands for transparency. One tendency noted in the literature is that CR communication is organised and structured. Corporations tend to professionalise CR communication in the sense that they provide information that corresponds to demands for transparency that are voiced by certain stakeholders. This also means that experts within the firm tend to communicate with professional stakeholders outside the firm. In this article, a particular aspect of the organisation of (...)
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  7.  24
    Signaling Sustainability Leadership: Empirical Evidence of the Value of DJSI Membership. [REVIEW]Michael Robinson, Anne Kleffner & Stephanie Bertels - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):493-505.
    We explore the relationship between corporate sustainability, reputation, and firm value by asking whether signaling sustainability leadership through membership on a recognized sustainability index is value generating. Increasingly, stakeholders are demanding that firms demonstrate their commitment to sustainability. One signal that companies can send to stakeholders to indicate that they are sustainability leaders is membership on a recognized “best in class” sustainability index. This article explores both the short-term and the intermediary impact on North American firms of being included or (...)
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  8.  36
    What's Mine is Mine; What's Yours is Mine: Private Ownership of Icts as a Threat to Transparency. [REVIEW]Ronnie Cohen & Janine S. Hiller - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (2):123-131.
    In the face of ubiquitous information communication technology, the presence of blogs, personal websites, and public message boards give the illusion of uncensored criticism and discussion of the ethical implications of business activities. However, little attention has been paid to the limitations on free speech posed by the control of access to the Internet by private entities, enabling them to censor content that is deemed critical of corporate or public policy. The premise of this research is that transparency alone will (...)
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