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  1. The “I” in ISCT: Normative and Empirical Facets of Integration.Katherina Glac & Tae Wan Kim - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):693-705.
    Integrative social contracts theory is a novel approach to normative questions and has been widely evaluated, discussed, and applied by academics and practitioners alike. While the "I" in ISCT leads the title, it has not received the analytical attention it deserves, especially since the "integrative" component in ISCT is multifaceted and at the conceptual core of the theory. In this paper we therefore take a closer look at two facets of integration. First, we examine the normative integration that takes place (...)
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  • Four Design Criteria for Any Future Contractarian Theory of Business Ethics.Ben Wempe - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):697-714.
    This article assesses the quality of Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) as a social contract argument. For this purpose, it embarks on a comparative analysis of the use of the social contract model as a theory of political authority and as a theory of social justice. Building on this comparison, it then develops four criteria for any future contractarian theory of business ethics (CBE). To apply the social contract model properly to the domain of business ethics, it should be: (1) (...)
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  • Returning to Rawls: Social Contracting, Social Justice, and Transcending the Limitations of Locke.Richard Marens - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):63-76.
    A generation ago, the field of business ethics largely abandoned analyzing the broader issue of social justice to focus upon more micro concerns. Donaldson applied the social contract tradition of Locke and Rawls to the ethics of management decision-making, and with Dunfee, has advanced this project ever since. Current events suggest that if the field is to remain relevant it needs to return to examining social and economic fairness, and Rawl's approach to social contracting suggests a way to start. First, (...)
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  • Corporate Autonomy and Buyer–Supplier Relationships: The Case of Unsafe Mattel Toys. [REVIEW]Julia Roloff & Michael S. Aßländer - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):517 - 534.
    This article analyses supplier-buyer relationships where the suppliers adapt to the buyers' needs and expectations to gain mutual advantages. In some cases, such closely knit relationships lead to violations of the autonomy of one or both partners. A concept of corporate autonomy (CA) is developed to analyze this problem. Three different facets can be distinguished: rule autonomy, executive autonomy, and control autonomy. A case study of Mattel's problems with lead-contaminated toys produced in China shows that the CA of buyer and (...)
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  • Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory.Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):229-241.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano, or individual, level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro-orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-to-day human interaction. We then (...)
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  • Value Creation, Management Competencies, and Global Corporate Citizenship: An Ordonomic Approach to Business Ethics in the Age of Globalization. [REVIEW]Ingo Pies, Markus Beckmann & Stefan Hielscher - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):265 - 278.
    This article develops an "ordonomic" approach to business ethics in the age of globalization. Through the use of a three-tiered conceptual framework that distinguishes between the basic game of antagonistic social cooperation, the meta game of rule-setting, and the meta-meta game of rule-finding discourse, we address three questions, the answers to which we believe are crucial to fostering effective business leadership and corporate social responsibility. First, the purpose of business in society is value creation. Companies have a social mandate to (...)
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  • An Ethical Analysis of Emotional Labor.Bruce Barry, Mara Olekalns & Laura Rees - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):17-34.
    Our understanding of emotional labor, while conceptually and empirically substantial, is normatively impoverished: very little has been said or written expressly about its ethical dimensions or ramifications. Emotional labor refers to efforts undertaken by employees to make their private feelings and/or public emotion displays consistent with job and organizational requirements. We formally define emotional labor, briefly summarize research in organizational behavior and social psychology on the causes and consequences of emotional labor, and present a normative analysis of its moral limits (...)
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  • Decent Work: The Moral Status of Labor in Human Resource Management.Miguel Alzola - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (4):835-853.
    In this paper, I aim to critically examine a set of assumptions that pervades human resource management and HR practices. I shall argue that they experience a remarkable ethics deficit, explain why this is so, and explore how the UN Global Compact labor principles may help taking ethics seriously in HRM. This paper contributes to the understanding and critical examination of the undisclosed beliefs underlying theory and practice in human resource management and to the examination of how the UN Global (...)
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  • The Social Contract Model of Corporate Purpose and Responsibility.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):433-460.
    ABSTRACT:Of the many developments in business ethics that Thomas Donaldson has helped pioneer, one is the application of social contract theory to address questions about the responsibilities of business actors. InCorporations and Morality, Donaldson develops one of the most sustained and comprehensive accounts that aims to justify the existence of for-profit corporations and to specify and ground their responsibilities. In order to further our understanding about the purpose and responsibilities of productive organizations, and as a contribution to the scholarship on (...)
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  • Regulation of the Global Marketplace for the Sake of Health.Marion Danis & Amy Sepinwall - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):667-676.
  • Ethics, Markets, and the Legalization of Insider Trading.Bruce W. Klaw & Don Mayer - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    In light of recent doctrinal changes, we examine the confused state of U.S. insider trading law, identifying gaps that permit certain market participants to trade on the basis of material nonpublic information, and contrast U.S. insider trading doctrine with the European approach. We then explore the ethical implications of the status quo in the U.S., explaining why the dominant legal justifications for prohibiting classical insider trading and misappropriation—the fiduciary duty and property rights theories—fail to account for the wrongfulness of insider (...)
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  • Spontaneous Sociability and Planned ProfitabilityTrust: The Social Virtues & the Creation of Prosperity.Patrick Primeaux & Francis Fukuyama - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (2):337.
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  • Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for Business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people inbusiness organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in turn, (...)
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  • Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for Business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people inbusiness organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in turn, (...)
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  • A Framework for Discussing Normative Theories of Business Ethics.Bishop John Douglas - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):563-591.
    This paper carries forward the conceptual clarification of normative theories of business ethics ably begun by Hasnas in the January 1998 issue of BEQ. This paper proposes a normatively neutral framework for discussing and assessing such normative theories. Every normative theory needs to address these seven issues: it needs to specify a moral principle that identifies (1) recommended values and (2) the grounds for accepting those values. It also must specify (3) a decision principle that business people who accept the (...)
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  • If Fairness Is the Problem, Is Consent the Solution? Integrating ISCT and Stakeholder Theory.Harry J. Van Buren - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):481-499.
  • Why Be Moral in Business? A Rawlsian Approach to Moral Motivation.Richard H. Toenjes - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):57-72.
    Abstract: This article puts forth the thesis that the contractualist account of moral justification affords a powerful reply in business contexts to the question why a business person should put ethics above immediate business interests. A brief survey of traditional theories of business ethics and their approaches to moral motivation is presented. These approaches are criticized. A contractualist conception of ethics in the business world is developed, based on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Scanlon. The desire to justify (...)
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  • The Deliberative Test, a New Procedural Method for Ethical Decision Making in Integrative Social Contracts Theory.Federico Ast - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):207-221.
    Integrative Social Contracts Theory is a popular framework to assist managers in making decisions on international moral dilemmas. Although the theory has been praised for its comprehensiveness and sophistication, commentators have raised concerns regarding the justification and identification of substantive hypernorms, fundamental moral principles valid across cultures. This paper introduces the deliberative test, a new method for testing the cross-cultural validity of ethical norms in ISCT. The test relies on the concept of Deliberative Capacity, arising from new developments in system-level (...)
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  • The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto: Implementing a Moral Values Foundation in the Multinational Enterprise. [REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill & Waheeda Lillevik - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):213 - 230.
    The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto (" Manifesto") is a moral framework/code of conduct which is both interactive and interdependent with the economic function of the main institutions of the economic system: markets, governments, civil society, and supranational organizations, which lays out a common fundamental vision of what is legitimate, just, and fair in economic activities. The Manifesto includes five universally accepted principles and values: the principle of humanity; the basic values of non-violence and respect for life; the basic values of (...)
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  • The Responsibilities and Role of Business in Relation to Society: Back to Basics?Nien-hê Hsieh - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):293-314.
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Failures: How Do Consumers Respond to Corporate Violations of Implied Social Contracts?Cristel Antonia Russell, Dale W. Russell & Heather Honea - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):759-773.
    This research documents consumers’ potential to monitor corporations’ License to Operate through their consumption responses to corporate social responsibility failures. The premise is that the type of social contracts or standards in place may determine how consumers, through their individual and collective behaviors, can play a direct role in influencing corporate behavior, when corporations fail to meet social responsibility standards. An experiment conducted with a large sample of consumers in the United States shows that consumers respond differently to a company’s (...)
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  • Institutional Pressures and Ethical Reckoning by Business Corporations.Frances Chua & Asheq Rahman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):307 - 329.
    Prior studies have provided explanations for the presence, use and dissemination of codes of corporate ethics or codes of corporate conduct of business corporations. Most such explanations are functional in nature, and are descriptive as they are derived from the codes and their associated documents. We search for more underlying explanations using two complementary theories: first, social contract theories explaining the exogenous and endogenous reasons of organizational behavior, and then institutional theory explaining why organizations take similar measures in response to (...)
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  • Small-Business Owner-Managers' Perceptions of Business Ethics and CSR-Related Concepts.Yves Fassin, Annick Van Rossem & Marc Buelens - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):425-453.
    Recent academic articles point to an increased vagueness and overlap in concepts related to business ethics and corporate responsibility. Further, the perception of these notions can differ in the smallbusiness world from the original academic definitions. This article focuses on the cognition of small-business owner-managers. Given the impact of small-business owner-managers on their ventures, corporate responsibility and ethical issues can take a different route in SMEs. The small-business owner-manager is able to shape the corporate culture and to enact values other (...)
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  • Corporate Autonomy and Buyer–Supplier Relationships: The Case of Unsafe Mattel Toys.Julia Roloff & Michael S. Aßländer - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):517-534.
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