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  1. On Several Approaches to Equality of Opportunity.John E. Roemer - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (2):165-200.
    The formal theory of equality of opportunity emerged as a response – a friendly amendment – to Ronald Dworkin's characterization of resource egalitarianism, as defined by the allocation that would emerge from insurance contracts arrived at behind a thin veil of ignorance. This article compares several of the prominent versions of this response, put forth in the period 1993–2008. I argue that a generalization of Roemer's proposal is the most satisfactory approach. Inherent in that generalization is an indeterminism, which reflects (...)
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  • Equal Opportunity, Reward and Respect for Preferences: Reply to Roemer.Marc Fleurbaey - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (2):201-216.
    This rejoinder to Roemer examines Roemer's amendment to his EOp criterion, explains the similarities and differences between Roemer's approach to equality of opportunity and the economic literature inspired by the fair allocation theory, and proposes some clarifications on the compensation principle and the role of the reward principle in the definition of a responsibility-sensitive social criterion. It highlights the power of the ideal of respect for individual preferences with respect to the reward issue and the concern for potential harshness of (...)
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  • Disadvantage and an American Society of Equals.Joshua Broady Preiss - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (1):41-58.
    In this article I review Jonathan Wolff and Avner de‐Shalit’s recent book Disadvantage (2007), highlighting its many contributions to egalitarian theory and practice. These contributions build to the authors’ central prescription: that policy‐makers work to create a society of equals by reducing the tendency for disadvantages to cluster around certain individuals or groups. From there, I discuss the idea of declustering disadvantage in an American context, and consider its implications for the politically salient ideal of equality of opportunity. The purpose (...)
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  • Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention.Shelley L. Tremain - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):132-158.
  • Moral Dimensions of Moral Hazards.Will Braynen - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (1):34-50.
    ‘Moral hazard’ is an economic term which commonly refers to situations in which people have a tendency to increase their exposure to risk when the costs of their actions, should they get unlucky, befall someone else. Once insured, for example, a person might have little reason, financially speaking, to be careful if he will get fully reimbursed for his losses should things go wrong, especially if he does not risk an increase in his insurance premium fees. In this article, I (...)
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  • Liberalism, Adaptive Preferences, and Gender Equality.Ann Levey - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):127-143.
  • Assessing Non-Intrinsic Limitarianism.Alexandru Volacu & Adelin Costin Dumitru - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (1):249-264.
    In this paper we aim to examine a novel view on distributive justice, i.e. limitarianism, which claims that it is morally impermissible to be rich. Our main goal is to assess the two arguments provided by Ingrid Robeyns in favour of limitarianism, namely the democratic argument and the argument from unmet urgent needs and the two distinct limitarian views which these arguments give rise to. We claim that strong limitarianism, which is supported by the democratic argument, should be rejected as (...)
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  • Can Competition Ever Be Fair? Challenging the Standard Prejudice.Christian Arnsperger & Philippe De Villé - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):433 - 451.
    In this paper, we challenge the usual argument which says that competition is a fair mechanism because it ranks individuals according to their relative preferences between effort and leisure. This argument, we claim, is very insufficient as a justification of fairness in competition, and we show that it does not stand up to scrutiny once various dynamic aspects of competition are taken into account. Once the sequential unfolding of competition is taken into account, competition turns out to be unfair even (...)
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  • Risk and Distributive Justice: The Case of Regulating New Technologies.Maria Paola Ferretti - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3): 501-515.
    There are certain kinds of risk for which governments, rather than individual actors, are increasingly held responsible. This article discusses how regulatory institutions can ensure an equitable distribution of risk between various groups such as rich and poor, and present and future generations. It focuses on cases of risk associated with technological and biotechnological innovation. After discussing various possibilities and difficulties of distribution, this article proposes a non-welfarist understanding of risk as a burden of cooperation.
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  • Rawls's Lexical Orderings Are Good Economics.Robert D. Cooter - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (1):47.
    Basic liberty, according to Rawls's first principle of justice, is not to be sacrificed for other values such as wealth. And, according to his second principle of justice, the material well-being of the worst-off members of society is not to be sacrificed to benefit better-off members of society. These trade-offs would be unjust, according to Rawls, no matter how small the sacrifice or how large the offsetting benefit. A decision-maker conforming to Rawls's theory, who is unwilling to sacrifice some values (...)
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  • Opportunity as Mutual Advantage.Robert Sugden - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):47-68.
    This paper argues that measurements of opportunity which focus on the contents of a person's opportunity set fail to capture open-ended aspects of opportunity that liberals should value. I propose an alternative conception of which does not require the explicit specification of opportunity sets, and which rests on an understanding of persons as responsible rather than rational agents. I suggest that issues of distributive fairness are best framed in terms of real income, and that meaningful measurements of real income are (...)
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  • Debate: Capabilities Versus Opportunities for Well-Being.Peter Vallentyne - 2005 - Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (3):359–371.
    Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have argued that justice is concerned, at least in part, with the distribution of capabilities (opportunities to function). Richard Arneson, G.A. Cohen, and John Roemer have argued that justice is concerned with something like the distribution of opportunities for well-being. I argue that, although some versions of the capability view are incompatible with some versions of the opportunity for well-being view, the most plausible version of the capability view is identical to a slight generalization of (...)
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  • Liberal Resourcism: Problems and Possibilities.Peter Vallentyne & Bertil Tungodden - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (4):348-369.
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  • Luck Egalitarianism and What Valuing Responsibility Requires.Alexandra Couto - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (2):193-217.
  • Critical Notices.Jonathan Wolff & Cynthia MacDonald - 1997 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (2):306 – 322.
    An Essay On Rights By Hillel Steiner Basil Blackwell, 1994. Pp. x + 305. ISBN 0-631-19027-9. Price 14.95 Connectionism and eliminativism: reply to Stephen Mills in Vol. 5, No. 1.
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  • Justice Between Age-Groups: A Comment on Norman Daniels.Dennis Mckerlie - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):227-234.
    ABSTRACT Norman Daniels suggests that the just distribution of resources between different age‐groups is determined by the choice a prudential agent would make in budgeting resources over the different temporal stages of a single life. He calls this view the “prudential lifespan account” of justice between age‐groups. Daniels thinks that the view recommends a rough kind of equality in resources between age‐groups. I argue that in the case of a single life prudence would choose an unequal distribution of resources. Consequently, (...)
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  • Equality of Opportunity and Personal Identity.Neven Petrović - 2009 - Acta Analytica 24 (2):97-111.
    One of the central theses of egalitarian liberals in the domain of distributive justice is that talented individuals should not be allowed to keep their entire market-income even if it flows solely from their greater abilities. This claim is usually supported by one of several arguments or some mixture of them, but in the present paper, I want to concentrate on the version that invokes equality of opportunity as its starting point. Namely, it is claimed that every human being should (...)
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  • Killing and the Time-Relative Interest Account.Nils Holtug - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (3):169-189.
    Jeff McMahan appeals to what he calls the “Time-relative Interest Account of the Wrongness of Killing ” to explain the wrongness of killing individuals who are conscious but not autonomous. On this account, the wrongness of such killing depends on the victim’s interest in his or her future, and this interest, in turn, depends on two things: the goods that would have accrued to the victim in the future; and the strength of the prudential relations obtaining between the victim at (...)
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  • Are Modern American Liberals Socialists or Social Democrats?N. Scott Arnold - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):262-282.
    This paper answers the title question, “Yes,” on both counts. The first part of the paper argues that modern liberals are socialists, and the second part argues that they are also social democrats. The main idea behind the first argument is that the state has effectively taken control of the incidents of ownership through its taxation, spending, and regulatory policies. The main idea behind the second argument is that the institutions of social democracy are replicated by the institutions favored by (...)
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  • Preserving Fairness: Williams Against Cohen on Just Inequality.Gideon Elford - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (6):699-713.
  • Sugden's Critique of the Capability Approach.Mozaffar Qizilbash - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (1):25-51.
    In comparing Sen's work with Mill's, Sugden criticizes Sen's capability approach because it may be applied in such a way that society or theorists judge what is best for people and potentially restrict liberty on that basis. Sugden cites Nussbaum's work as evidence in making his case. Sugden's critique of Sen's approach succeeds on a narrow reading of it. On that reading Sen is also critical of it because it does not leave enough room for liberty. On a broad reading, (...)
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  • Misfortune, Welfare Reform, and Right‐Wing Egalitarianism.Patrick Boleyn‐Fitzgerald - 1999 - Critical Review 13 (1-2):141-163.
    Abstract A close look at the rhetoric in America's recent welfare?reform debate has both surprising and important implications for political philosophy. Political philosophers typically presume that opponents of redistribution are motivated by considerations other than equality. Recent arguments for welfare reform, however, have been formulated in a manner consistent with most contemporary egalitarian theories. This result should make us question either the political relevance of egalitarian ideals or the adequacy of those theories of equality.
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  • Fresh Starts for Poor Health Choices: Should We Provide Them and Who Should Pay?Andreas Albertsen - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):55-64.
    Should we grant a fresh start to those who come to regret their past lifestyle choices? A negative response to this question can be located in the luck egalitarian literature. As a responsibility-sensitive theory of justice, luck egalitarianism considers it just that people’s relative positions reflect their past choices, including those they regret. In a recent article, Vansteenkiste, Devooght and Schokkaert argue against the luck egalitarian view, maintaining instead that those who regret their past choices in health are disadvantaged in (...)
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  • The Veil of Ignorance Violates Priority.Juan D. Moreno-Ternero & John E. Roemer - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):233-257.
    The veil of ignorance has been used often as a tool for recommending what justice requires with respect to the distribution of wealth. We complete Harsanyi's model of the veil of ignorance by appending information permitting objective comparisons among persons. In order to do so, we introduce the concept of objective empathy. We show that the veil-of-ignorance conception of John Harsanyi, so completed, and Ronald Dworkin's, when modelled formally, recommend wealth allocations in conflict with the prominently espoused view that priority (...)
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  • Two Models of Equality and Responsibility.Michael Blake & Mathias Risse - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):165-199.
  • Dworkin on Equality of Resources.Hal R. Varian - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):110-125.
    This essay is a review of Ronald Dworkin's recent essay on equality of resources . Many of the ideas discussed by Dworkin have also been examined by economists with, I believe, considerable insight. Unfortunately, economists tend to write for economists, not for philosophers, and their insights are seldom communicated properly to noneconomists. Of course, the same criticism can be levied on philosophers! But perhaps legal theorists are less subject to this criticism. One of the great contributions of Dworkin is that (...)
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  • Means and Capabilities in the Discussion of Distributive Justice.Gustavo Pereira - 2006 - Ratio Juris 19 (1):55-79.
  • A Lockean Argument for Universal Access to Health Care.Daniel M. Hausman - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):166-191.
    This essay defends the controversial and indeed counterintuitive claim that there is a good argument to be made from a Lockean perspective for government action to guarantee access to health care. The essay maintains that this argument is in some regards more robust than the well-known argument in defense of universal health care spelled out by Norman Daniels, which this essay also examines in some detail. Locke's view that government should protect people's lives, property, and freedom–where freedom is understood as (...)
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  • Global Distributive Justice: An Egalitarian Perspective.Cécile Fabre - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (sup1):139-164.
  • One Kiss Too Many? Giving, Luck Egalitarianism and Other-Affecting Choice.Hugh Lazenby - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (3):271-286.
  • The Symmetry of Responsibility.Gideon Elford - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (3):273-287.
  • On Fair Compensation.Marc Fleurbaey - 1994 - Theory and Decision 36 (3):277-307.
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  • If We Value Individual Responsibility, Which Policies Should We Favour?Alexander Brown - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):23–44.
  • Global Equality of Resources and the Problem of Valuation.Alexander Brown - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (5):609-628.
  • Zwei Ideale globaler Gleichheit.Jan-Christoph Heilinger - 2016 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 64 (5):757-767.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie Jahrgang: 64 Heft: 5 Seiten: 757-767.
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  • Egalitarianism and Equal Availability of Political Influence.Harry Brighouse - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (2):118–141.
  • The Fundamental Disagreement Between Luck Egalitarians and Relational Egalitarians.Elizabeth Anderson - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (S1):1-23.
  • On Citizenship, States, and Markets.Ayelet Shachar & Ran Hirschl - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (2):231-257.
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  • Talent Development and the Luck Problem.Richard Bailey - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):367 – 377.
    This paper examines the relationship between the development of talented young sports people and conceptions of social justice. It is set within the context of recent policy developments in the United Kingdom that place renewed emphasis on talent development (and wider issues of ?gifted and talented education?), and justifies this with explicit reference to social justice. After providing a summary of relevant policy initiatives and their often-unstated presumptions, the paper goes on to examine the different ways in which philosophers have (...)
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  • Disability, Status Enhancement, Personal Enhancement and Resource Allocation.Jonathan Wolff - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):49-68.
    It often appears that the most appropriate form of addressing disadvantage related to disability is through policies that can be called “status enhancements”: changes to the social, cultural and material environment so that the difficulties experienced by those with impairments are reduced, even eradicated. However, status enhancements can also have their limitations. This paper compares the relative merits of policies of status enhancement and “personal enhancement”: changes to the disabled person. It then takes up the question of how to assess (...)
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  • Climate Change, Fundamental Interests, and Global Justice.Carl Knight - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (5):629-644.
  • Taking Talents Seriously.Simon Green - 1988 - Critical Review 2 (2-3):202-219.
  • Towards a Critique of the Moral Foundations of Intellectual Property Rights.Theodoros Papaioannou - 2006 - Journal of Global Ethics 2 (1):67 – 90.
    Research in recent history has neglected to address the moral foundations of particular kinds of public policy such as the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs). On the one hand, nation-states have enforced a tightening of the IPR system. On the other, only recently have national government and international institutions recognised that the moral justification for stronger IPRs protection is far from being plausible and cannot be taken for granted. In this article, IPRs are examined as individual rights founded upon (...)
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  • Retracted: Being Lucky and Being Deserving, and Distribution.Anthony Amatrudo - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (4):658-669.
    This paper examines the concepts of desert and luck, familiar in political theory but neglected by sociologists. I argue that the idea of desert is composed of both personal performance and the degree of responsibility a person has over that performance. Distribution ought to be in accordance with the indebtedness created by the person's performance. This can be compromised by luck; that is, personal desert is undermined where lack of performance scuttles the applicability of the contributory model. This paper examines (...)
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  • Equality of Opportunities, Divergent Conceptualisations and Their Implications for Early Childhood Care and Education Policies.Christian Morabito & Michel Vandenbroeck - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (3):456-472.
    This article aims to explore the relations between equality of opportunity and early childhood. By referring to the work of contemporary philosophers, i.e. Rawls, Sen, Dworkin, Cohen and Roemer, we argue for different possible interpretations, based on political discussions, concerning how to operationalize equality of opportunities. We represent these diverging options on a continuum, ranging from Responsibility-oriented Equality of Opportunity and Circumstances-oriented Equality of Opportunity. We then analyse how early childhood care and education policies can be constructed in relation to (...)
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  • Are Early Confucians Consequentialists?Wang Yunping - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (1):19-34.
    Various attempts have been made to interpret Confucian ethics in the framework of consequentialist ethics. Such interpretations either treat Mencius theory of moral choice as a kind of act-utilitarianism or attribute to Mencius a rather sophisticated consequentialist moral view. In this paper I challenge such interpretations and try to clarify the nature of the Confucian conception of the good. In order to show that the Confucian good is teleological but non-consequentialist, I will discuss different ways (especially those of John Rawls (...)
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  • Assessing Global Poverty and Inequality: Income, Resources, and Capabilities.Ingrid Robeyns - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):30-49.
  • Training, Perfectionism and Fairness.Jonathan Wolff - 2004 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):285-295.
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  • L'interprétation du principe de la propriété de soi au sein du libertarisme de gauche.Peter Dietsch - 2008 - Dialogue 47 (1):65-.
    RÉSUMÉ: La notion de propriété de soi présuppose la définition des droits de propriété sur les ressources externes que le libertarisme de gauche limite habituellement aux ressources naturelles. Or, dans une économie spécialisée, la propriété de soi doitégalement être complétée par une définition des droits de propriété sur le surplus coopératif. S'il est cohérent, pour un libertarien de gauche, de considérer le surplus coopératif comme ressource externe et de le distribuer d'une manière égale, on doit en outre observer qu'une théorie (...)
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  • Liberalism, Adaptive Preferences, and Gender Equality.Ann Levey - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):127-143.
    I argue that a gendered division of labor is often the result of choices by women that count as fully voluntary because they are an expression of preferences and commitments that reflect women's understanding of their own good. Since liberalism has a commitment to respecting fully voluntary choices, it has a commitment to respecting these gendered choices. I suggest that justified political action may require that we fail to respect some people's considered choices.
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