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  1. Are Conscientious Objectors Morally Obligated to Refer?Samuel Reis-Dennis & Abram L. Brummett - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):547-550.
    In this paper, we argue that providers who conscientiously refuse to provide legal and professionally accepted medical care are not always morally required to refer their patients to willing providers. Indeed, we will argue that refusing to refer is morally admirable in certain instances. In making the case, we show that belief in a sweeping moral duty to refer depends on an implicit assumption that the procedures sanctioned by legal and professional norms are ethically permissible. Focusing on examples of female (...)
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  • Acts and Distance—a Commentary on Brummett's ‘When Conscientious Objection Runs Amok’.Michal Pruski - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (2):211-216.
    In his ‘When conscientious objection runs amok: A physician refusing human immunodeficiency virus preventative to a bisexual patient’, Brummett has argued that Catholic physicians should not be able to raise conscientious objections to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for bisexual patients, as this constitutes discrimination. Brummett argues that such a conscientious objection represents an instance of conscience creep, which he argues is undesirable. Here I re-analyse the case presented by Brummett using a teleological framework and making reference to Catholic teaching on cooperation (...)
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  • Toward a Standard of Medical Care: Why Medical Professionals Can Refuse to Prescribe Puberty Blockers.Ryan Kulesa - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-17.
    That a standard of medical care must outline services that benefit the patient is relatively uncontroversial. However, one must determine how the practices outlined in a medical standard of care sh...
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  • Conscientious Objection or an Internal Morality of Medicine?David Hershenov - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (1):104-121.
    Doctors, nurses, and pharmacists who refuse on grounds of conscience to participate in certain legal, expected, and standard practices have been accused of unprofessionally introducing their personal views into medicine. My first response is that they often are not engaging in conscientious objection because that involves invoking convictions external to those of the medical community. I contend that medicine, properly construed, is pathocentric, and so refusing to induce a pathology via abortion, contraception, euthanasia, etc., is actually being loyal to the (...)
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  • What Makes Conscientious Refusals Concerning Abortion Different.Jason T. Eberl - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (8):62-64.
    Fritz argues that there is an “unjustified asymmetry” in legislation that allows physicians and health care institutions to refuse to provide elective abortions and other morally contested l...
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  • Purely Faith-Based Vs. Rationally-Informed Theological Bioethics.Jason T. Eberl - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):14-16.
    Commentary on re-opening dialogue between theological and secular voices in bioethics.
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  • Conscientious Objection in Health Care.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):483-486.
    Introduction to a special issue of _Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics_ on whether health care professionals should have a legally-protected right to conscientiously refuse to provide legal services that are autonomously requested by patients. Outlines the parameters of the current debate in the bioethics literature and orients readers to the articles the special issue comprises.
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  • When Conscientious Objection Runs Amok: A Physician Refusing HIV Preventative to a Bisexual Patient.Abram Brummett - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (2):151-154.
    This paper reports of a case where a physician conscientiously objected to prescribing PrEP to a bisexual patient so as not to “enable immoral sexual behavior.” The case represents an instance of conscience creep, a phenomenon whereby clinicians invoke conscientious objection in sometimes objectionable ways that extend beyond the traditional contexts of abortion, sterilization, or physician aid in dying. This essay uses a reasonability view of conscientious objection to argue that the above case represents a discriminatory instance of conscience creep (...)
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  • Secular Clinical Ethicists Should Not Be Neutral Toward All Religious Beliefs: An Argument for a Moral-Metaphysical Proceduralism.Abram L. Brummett - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (6):5-16.
    Secular clinical ethics has responded to the problem of moral pluralism with a procedural approach. However, defining this term stirs debate: H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr. has championed a contentless proceduralism, while others, conversely, argue for a proceduralism that permits some content in the form of moral claims. This paper argues that the content P2 permits ought to be expanded to include some metaphysical commitments, in an approach referred to as P2+. The need for P2+ is demonstrated by analyzing and rejecting (...)
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