Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Changing the Academic Integrity Climate on Campus Using a Technology-Based Intervention.Jeffrey K. Mullins, David E. Douglas, Roger McHaney & Timothy Paul Cronan - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (2):89-105.
    This article focuses on the use of a technology-based intervention to change academic integrity knowledge and attitudes. Using a sample of more than 5,000 freshman students drawn from two major midwestern universities in the United States over a 3-year period, an online intervention was used to determine whether AI knowledge and attitudes could be changed. Based the results of this study, AI knowledge and attitudes can be improved using an online intervention. These results contribute to a better understanding of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Academic Misconduct Among Portuguese Economics and Business Undergraduate Students- A Comparative Analysis with Other Major Students.Carla Freire - 2014 - Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (1):43-63.
    The main purpose of this study is to understand the demographic, personal and situational determining factors leading to academic misconduct among undergraduate students by comparatively analyzing the differences among Economics and Business students and other major students. Two thousand four hundred ninety-two undergraduate students from different Portuguese Public Universities answered a questionnaire regarding their propensity to commit academic fraud, 640 of whom were Economics and Business students. Results concluded that Economics and Business students can be distinguished from others regarding the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • University Students’ Perceptions of Academic Cheating: Triangulating Quantitative and Qualitative Findings.Tianlan Wei, Steven R. Chesnut, Lucy Barnard-Brak & Marcelo Schmidt - 2014 - Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (4):287-298.
    Using a parallel mixed-methods design, the current study examined university students’ perceptions of academic cheating through collecting and analyzing both the quantitative and qualitative data. Our quantitative findings corroborate previous research that male students have engaged more in academic cheating than females based on students’ self-reports, and that undergraduate students are less willing to discuss issues on academic cheating as compared with their graduate counterparts. Five themes emerged from the thematic analysis of the qualitative data: flexible definitions for cheating, environmental (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Study of Cheating Beliefs, Engagement, and Perception – The Case of Business and Engineering Students.Carla M. Ghanem & Najib A. Mozahem - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (3):291-312.
    Studies have found that academic dishonesty is widespread. Of particular interest is the case of business students since many are expected to be the leaders of tomorrow. This study examines the cheating behaviors and perceptions of 819 business and engineering students at three private Lebanese universities, two of which are ranked as the top two universities in the country. Our results show that cheating is pervasive in the universities to an alarming degree. We first analyzed the data by looking at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Academic Integrity in Higher Education: The Case of a Medium-Size College in the Galilee, Israel.Jonathan Kasler, Meirav Hen & Adi Sharabi-Nov - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (2):151-167.
    An important measure of the success of an academic institution is evaluation of its moral health. In order to investigate academic integrity in our institution, we administered the Academic Integrity Survey to a representative sample of 384 students from different departments. In addition we performed content analysis on 24 disciplinary hearing files from the previous academic year in order to ascertain which students were brought before the committee and why. Results show that the majority of students perceived academic misconduct as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Machiavellianism, Moral Orientation, Social Desirability Response Bias, and Anti-Intellectualism: A Profile of Canadian Accountants.Anis Triki, Gail Lynn Cook & Darlene Bay - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (3):623-635.
    Prior research has demonstrated that accountants differ from the general population on many personality traits. Understanding accountants’ personality traits is important when these characteristics may impact professional behavior or ability to work with members of the business community. Our study investigates the relationship between Machiavellianism, ethical orientation, anti-intellectualism, and social desirability response bias in Canadian accountants. We find that Canadian accountants score much higher on the Machiavellianism scale than U.S. accountants. Additionally, our results show a significant relationship between Machiavellianism and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Factors of Academic Misconduct in a Cross-Cultural Perspective and the Role of Integrity Systems.Marina Makarova - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (1):51-71.
    In this article, the main factors of academic cheating and plagiarism in four countries are analyzed. Three groups of factors are investigated, namely individual, motivational, and contextual. A mixed method approach has been used, with material including student surveys, interviews with university teachers and administrators, and analysis of university documents. The survey results show that the role of individual social-demographic factors are not significant for predicting misconduct. Students are prone to neutralize their own blame in misconduct, and refer to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Leaders’ Core Self-Evaluation, Ethical Leadership, and Employees’ Job Performance: The Moderating Role of Employees’ Exchange Ideology.Jaehyung Ahn, Soojin Lee & Seokhwa Yun - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):457-470.
    With the increasing demand for ethical standards in the current business environment, ethical leadership has received particular attention. Drawing on self-verification theory and social exchange theory, this study investigated the effect of leaders’ core self-evaluation on the display of ethical leadership and the moderating role of employees’ exchange ideology in the relationship between ethical leadership and employees’ job performance. Consistent with the hypotheses, the results from a sample of 225 dyads of employees and their immediate leaders showed a positive relationship (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating Among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Further Understanding Factors That Explain Freshman Business Students’ Academic Integrity Intention and Behavior: Plagiarism and Sharing Homework.Timothy Paul Cronan, Jeffrey K. Mullins & David E. Douglas - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):197-220.
    Academic integrity violations on college campuses continue to be a significant concern that draws public attention. Even though AI has been the subject of numerous studies offering explanations and recommendations, academic dishonesty persists. Consequently, this has rekindled interest in understanding AI behavior and its influencers. This paper focuses on the AI violations of plagiarism and sharing homework for freshman business students, examining the factors that influence a student’s intention to plagiarize or share homework with others. Using a sample of more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations