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  1. Integrity Versus Expediency for Non-Anthropocentrists.Dan C. Shahar - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):271-274.
    Kevin Elliott observes that environmental protection efforts often benefit humans, not just because the natural environment is useful, but also because activities that result in environmental protections can also promote a range of other human values. Elliott argues that environmentalists could gain practical advantages by emphasizing these indirect benefits. He also insists that even for environmentalists who believe that nature ought to be protected for its own sake, deploying such arguments would not necessarily pose problems of integrity since more explicitly (...)
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  • Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments and Anthropocentric Moral Attitudes.Duncan Purves - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):267-270.
    Anthropocentric indirect arguments , which call for specific policies or actions because of human benefits that are correlated with but not caused by benefits to the environment, are gaining increasing traction with those who take a pragmatic approach to environmental protection. I contend that nonanthropocentrists might remain justifiably uneasy about AIAs because such arguments fail to challenge prevailing speciesist moral attitudes. I close by considering whether Elliott can address this concern of nonanthropocentrists by appealing to the ability of AIAs to (...)
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  • Losing the Message: Some Policy Implications of Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments for Environmental Protection.Chad J. McGuire - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):261-263.