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  1. Medicine, the Media and Political Interests.W. Lipworth, I. Kerridge, B. Morrell, C. Bonfiglioli & R. Forsyth - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):768-770.
    The news media is frequently criticised for failing to support the goals of government health campaigns. But is this necessarily the purpose of the media? We suggest that while the media has an important role in disseminating health messages, it is a mistake to assume that the media should serve the interests of government as it has its own professional ethics, norms, values, structures and roles that extend well beyond the interests of the health sector, and certainly beyond those of (...)
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  • Health Journalists' Perceptions of Their Professional Roles and Responsibilities for Ensuring the Veracity of Reports of Health Research.Rowena Forsyth, Bronwen Morrell, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Simon Chapman - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):130 - 141.
    Health industries attempt to influence the public through the news media and through their relationships with expert academics and opinion leaders. This study reports journalists' perceptions of their professional roles and responsibilities regarding the relationships between industry and academia and research results. Journalists believe that responsibility for the scientific validity of their reports rests with academics and systems of peer review. However, this approach fails to account for the extent of industry-academy interactions and the flaws of peer review. Health journalists' (...)
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  • A Masochist's Teapot: Where to Put the Handle in Media Ethics.Thomas W. Hickey - 2003 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (1):44-67.
    The four guiding principles of the Society of Professional Journalists express ethical tension that can be viewed as a conflict between the metaphysical concepts of the "One" and the "Many." Historically, the most satisfying resolution of this tension has been the doctrine of the Trinity. When studied as a philosophical construct, this model, drawn from religion, can demonstrate a way to resolve the tension inherent in good journalism. This study reduces this resolution to grids that can be used for plotting (...)
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  • Measuring Journalistic Values: A Cosmopolitan/Community Continuum.Elizabeth K. Viall - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (1):41 – 53.
    Many philosophers approach values by defining what is good, what has value or, often, what ought to be. The concept that humankind's values could be measured has brought social sciences into the valuation realm. Social scientists began value measurement in the 1900s. At the same time, the concept of fundamental human values spread. The widely-used Rokeach Value Survey is adapted to test for value differences among cosmopolitan and community journalists. Journalists have common values, but other factors such as community heterogeneity (...)
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  • Views of Health Journalists, Industry Employees and News Consumers About Disclosure and Regulation of Industry-Journalist Relationships: An Empirical Ethical Study.W. Lipworth, I. Kerridge, B. Morrell, R. Forsyth & C. F. C. Jordens - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):252-257.
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  • "Fruit of the Poisonous Tree": Journalistic Ethics and Voice-Mail Surveillance.Cecilia Friend & Donald Challenger - 2001 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (4):255-272.
    A 1998 Cincinnati Enquirer investigation into the Central American labor practices of Chiquita Brands International was substantiated by the taped words of company officials themselves. Yet, soon after publication, the Enquirer ran a stunning front-page retraction and disavowed the report without challenging its claims. The Gannett Corporation, the paper's owner, paid Chiquita $14 million to avoid a suit. The resultant outcry by journalists was directed not at Gannett, but at lead reporter Michael Gallagher, who had surreptitiously accessed Chiquita voice mail (...)
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  • Ethics of Care: More Than Just Another Tool to Bash the Media?Bastiaan Vanacker & John Breslin - 2006 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2-3):196-214.
    In this article, we explore the potential contribution of care ethics to the field of media ethics. In the first part of this article, we discuss the theoretical and philosophical background of the ethics of care. In the second part, we suggest some specific avenues for theoretical, critical, and practical applications of care ethics to the field of journalism and media ethics.
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  • Information Ethics as a Guide for New Media.Edward H. Spence & Aaron Quinn - 2008 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (4):264 – 279.
    Good journalism is based—and to some extent thrives—on a diversity of perspectives from those who supply information and informed opinions to the public. New media journalism is a contemporary newsgathering and disseminating method with enormous communication potential because it is an online forum that can connect a great number of diverse contributors and audiences. Citizen journalism—performed on a global level through the Web—is a potential marvel because of its wide reach and range of diversity. This paper offers an examination and (...)
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  • A Case for the Cast Approach: An Essay Review by David Boeyink.David Boeyink - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):178 – 183.
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  • Media Ethics on a Higher Order of Magnitude.Clifford G. Christians - 2008 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):3 – 14.
    Between Summits I and II, media ethics established its legitimacy, summarized into recommendations for the field's future fluorescence. This history points to the challenges through which media ethics moves to another order of magnitude. A historical map of media ethics scholarship since 1980 divides into 5 domains, and each is introduced: theory, social philosophy, religious ethics, technology, and truth. From this content analysis of the literature, an agenda emerges for research and academic study that can raise media ethics to a (...)
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  • Ethical Standards of French and U.S. Newspaper Journalists.Aralynn Abare McMane - 1993 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (4):207 – 218.
    This study compares findings from the author's survey of 310 French newspaper journalists in France with a simultaneous survey done in the United States. In both studies, journalists replied to the same battery of questions about ethical standards in reporting. Results provide evidence of shared values among French journalists and, to a much lesser extent, between French and U.S. journalists. The highest agreement was found in support of keeping a promise of source confidentiality. French results further indicated support for the (...)
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  • Media Ethics in Australia.Lawrence Apps - 1990 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (2):117 – 135.
    Codified ethics for journalists in Australia has a long history, almost as long as that in the United States. Unlike the United States, however, Australia has a unified code of ethics, that of the Australian Journalists' Association, which is generally accepted by the whole industry, both print and broadcast. But over the last 20 years, media consumers have shown they have a poor and declining view of the ethics of Australian journalists, despite the checks and balances that exist. Recent signs, (...)
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