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  1. The Nature of the Emotions and the Ethics of Cosmetic Psychopharmacology.Samuel Duncan - 2016 - Public Affairs Quarterly 30 (1).
    Most of the literature on the ethics of psychopharmacology has focused on the question of whether altering our emotions by using drugs is somehow inauthentic. In this essay I argue that this focus on authenticity is misplaced and that the more important question concerns the nature of the emotions themselves. I show that what one takes the emotions to be is possibly the most important factor in deciding whether or not psychopharmacology is morally problematic and, if so, why. I illustrate (...)
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  • What is Morally Salient About Enhancement Technologies?Auke J. K. Pols & Wybo Houkes - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):84-87.
    The human enhancement debate typically centres on moral issues regarding changes in human nature, not on the means for these changes. We argue that one cannot grasp what is morally salient about human enhancement without understanding how technologies affect human action and practical reasoning. We present a minimalist conception of human agents as bounded practical reasoners. Then, we categorise different effects of technologies on our possibilities for action and our evaluation of these possibilities. For each, we discuss whether enhancement technologies (...)
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  • The Future of Psychopharmacological Enhancements: Expectations and Policies.Maartje Schermer, Ineke Bolt, Reinoud de Jongh & Berend Olivier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (2):75-87.
    The hopes and fears expressed in the debate on human enhancement are not always based on a realistic assessment of the expected possibilities. Discussions about extreme scenarios may at times obscure the ethical and policy issues that are relevant today. This paper aims to contribute to an adequate and ethically sound societal response to actual current developments. After a brief outline of the ethical debate concerning neuro-enhancement, it describes the current state of the art in psychopharmacological science and current uses (...)
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  • Is Prozac a Feminist Drug?Ginger A. Hoffman & Jennifer L. Hansen - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):89.
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  • ‘Cosmetic Neurology’ and the Moral Complicity Argument.A. Ravelingien, J. Braeckman, L. Crevits, D. De Ridder & E. Mortier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):151-162.
    Over the past decades, mood enhancement effects of various drugs and neuromodulation technologies have been proclaimed. If one day highly effective methods for significantly altering and elevating one’s mood are available, it is conceivable that the demand for them will be considerable. One urgent concern will then be what role physicians should play in providing such services. The concern can be extended from literature on controversial demands for aesthetic surgery. According to Margaret Little, physicians should be aware that certain aesthetic (...)
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  • Brave New World Versus Island -- Utopian and Dystopian Views on Psychopharmacology.M. H. N. Schermer - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):119-128.
    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a famous dystopia, frequently called upon in public discussions about new biotechnology. It is less well known that 30 years later Huxley also wrote a utopian novel, called Island. This paper will discuss both novels focussing especially on the role of psychopharmacological substances. If we see fiction as a way of imagining what the world could look like, then what can we learn from Huxley’s novels about psychopharmacology and how does that relate to the (...)
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  • Can There Be a 'Cosmetic' Psychopharmacology? Prozac Unplugged: The Search for an Ontologically Distinct Cosmetic Psychopharmacology.Pamela Bjorklund - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):131-143.
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  • Reasons for Comfort and Discomfort with Pharmacological Enhancement of Cognitive, Affective, and Social Domains.Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):93-106.
    The debate over the propriety of cognitive enhancement evokes both enthusiasm and worry. To gain further insight into the reasons that people may have for endorsing or eschewing pharmacological enhancement, we used empirical tools to explore public attitudes towards PE of twelve cognitive, affective, and social domains. Participants from Canada and the United States were recruited using Mechanical Turk and were randomly assigned to read one vignette that described an individual who uses a pill to enhance a single domain. After (...)
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  • Is Prozac a Feminist Drug?Ginger A. Hoffman & Jennifer L. Hansen - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):89-120.
    There is a sense in which antidepressants are feminist drugs, liberating and empowering …A lot of things have been said about Prozac.1 We have been instructed both to "listen" and to "talk back" to Prozac (Kramer 1993; Breggin 1994), Prozac has been called a wonder drug (Schumer 1989; Cowley 1990), it has been described as capable of dramatically changing selves and dramatically changing our conception of what a self is (Kramer 1993), it has been accused of dulling our artistic drive (...)
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  • In the Grip of the Python: Conflicts at the University-Industry Interface.David Healy - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):59-71.
    When the University of Toronto withdrew a contract it held with me in December 2000, it initiated a sequence of events that led to a public letter to the University from senior figures in the world psychopharmacology community protesting against the infringement of academic freedom involved and a first ever legal action, undertaked by this author, seeking redress for a violation of academic freedom. The issues of academic freedom surrounding this case have been intertwined with a debate about the possibility (...)
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  • Motivation? Meh ….Diego S. Silva - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):28-29.
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  • Comparison of Philosophical Concerns Between Professionals and the Public Regarding Two Psychiatric Treatments.Laura Yenisa Cabrera, Marisa Brandt, Rachel McKenzie & Robyn Bluhm - forthcoming - Ajob Empirical Bioethics:1-15.
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  • Is Medicating Vices Morally Suspect?Jody L. Graham - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):33-35.
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  • Enhancing Sisyphus.César Palacios-González & David R. Lawrence - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):26-27.
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  • Should Uplifting Music and Smart Phone Apps Count as Willpower Doping? The Extended Will and the Ethics of Enhanced Motivation.Joel Anderson & Bart A. Kamphorst - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):35-37.
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  • Enhancing Motivation by Use of Prescription Stimulants: The Ethics of Motivation Enhancement.Torben Kjærsgaard - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):4-10.
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  • Quality of Life Assessments, Cognitive Reliability, and Procreative Responsibility.Jason Marsh - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (2):436-466.
    Recent work in the psychology of happiness has led some to conclude that we are unreliable assessors of our lives and that skepticism about whether we are happy is a genuine possibility worth taking very seriously. I argue that such claims, if true, have worrisome implications for procreation. In particular, they show that skepticism about whether many if not most people are well positioned to create persons is a genuine possibility worth taking very seriously. This skeptical worry should not be (...)
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  • Against Happiness.Carl Elliott - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):167-171.
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