Citations of work:

Jeffrey L. Elman (1995). Language as a Dynamical System.

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  1.  36
    The Linguistic Subversion of Mental Representation.Whit Schonbein - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (3):235-262.
    Embedded and embodied approaches to cognition urge that (1) complicated internal representations may be avoided by letting features of the environment drive behavior, and (2) environmental structures can play an enabling role in cognition, allowing prior cognitive processes to solve novel tasks. Such approaches are thus in a natural position to oppose the ‘thesis of linguistic structuring’: The claim that the ability to use language results in a wholesale recapitulation of linguistic structure in onboard mental representation. Prominent examples of researchers (...)
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  2.  40
    What a Rational Parser Would Do.John T. Hale - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):399-443.
    This article examines cognitive process models of human sentence comprehension based on the idea of informed search. These models are rational in the sense that they strive to find a good syntactic analysis quickly. Informed search derives a new account of garden pathing that handles traditional counterexamples. It supports a symbolic explanation for local coherence as well as an algorithmic account of entropy reduction. The models are expressed in a broad framework for theories of human sentence comprehension.
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  3.  79
    An Alternative View of the Mental Lexicon.Jeffrey Elman L. - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):301-306.
    An essential aspect of knowing language is knowing the words of that language. This knowledge is usually thought to reside in the mental lexicon, a kind of dictionary that contains information regarding a word’s meaning, pronunciation, syntactic characteristics, and so on. In this article, a very different view is presented. In this view, words are understood as stimuli that operate directly on mental states. The phonological, syntactic and semantic properties of a word are revealed by the effects it has on (...)
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  4.  80
    Dynamical Approaches to Cognitive Science.Randall D. Beer - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (3):91-99.